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Attitudes to ageing among older Norwegian adults living in the community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283443
Source
Br J Community Nurs. 2017 May 02;22(5):238-245
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-02-2017
Author
Mary H Kalfoss
Source
Br J Community Nurs. 2017 May 02;22(5):238-245
Date
May-02-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - psychology
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Depression - psychology
Female
Humans
Independent living
Loneliness
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Nurses
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Attitudes toward ageing have powerful influences and impact older adults' own perception of health, quality of life and utilisation of health and social care services. This study describes attitudes to ageing among 490 Norwegian older adults living in the community who responded to The Attitudes to Ageing Questionnaire. Results showed that in spite of physical changes and psychological losses, the attitudes of older adults support life acceptance with gained wisdom in feeling that there were many pleasant things about growing older and that their identity was not defined by their age. They demonstrated the ability to incorporate age-related changes within their identities and at the same time maintain a positive view of self. Although they acknowledged that old age represented a time of loss with decreasing physical independence, they meant that their lives had made a difference, they wanted to give a good example to younger persons and felt it was a privilege to grow old.
PubMed ID
28467243 View in PubMed
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Community-dwelling older adults with memory loss: needs assessment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115614
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2013 Mar;59(3):278-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Karen Parsons
Aimee Surprenant
Anne-Marie Tracey
Marshall Godwin
Author Affiliation
Memorial University of Newfoundland, St John's, NL A1B 3V6. karenp@mun.ca
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2013 Mar;59(3):278-85
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Health
Family Practice
Female
Focus Groups
Health Services for the Aged
Humans
Independent living
Interviews as Topic
Male
Memory Disorders - psychology - therapy
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
Newfoundland and Labrador
Physician-Patient Relations
Qualitative Research
Social Support
Abstract
To identify the health-related needs of community-dwelling older adults with mild memory loss.
Qualitative study using semistructured, audiotaped, face-to-face interviews and focus groups.
A large community in Newfoundland.
Twenty-two adults between the ages of 58 and 80 years.
This needs assessment used a qualitative methodology of collecting and analyzing narrative data to develop an understanding of the issues, resources, and constraints of community-dwelling older adults with mild memory loss. Data were collected through semistructured, audiotaped, face-to-face interviews and focus groups. Transcripts of the interviews were analyzed using interpretive phenomenologic analysis.
Three constitutive patterns with relational themes and subthemes were identified: forgetting and remembering, normalizing yet questioning, and having limited knowledge of resources. Participants described many examples of how their daily lives were affected by forgetfulness. They had very little knowledge of resources that provided information or support. Most of the participants believed they could not discuss their memory problems with their family doctors.
It is important for older adults with mild memory loss to have access to resources that will assist them in understanding their condition and make them feel supported.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23486801 View in PubMed
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Living alone with dementia: an interpretive phenomenological study with older women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142787
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2010 Aug;66(8):1698-707
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2010
Author
Lorna de Witt
Jenny Ploeg
Margaret Black
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Windsor, Ontario, Canada. ladewitt@uwindsor.ca
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2010 Aug;66(8):1698-707
Date
Aug-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Health
Dementia - drug therapy - physiopathology - psychology
Female
Health status
Humans
Independent Living - psychology
Marital status
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
Ontario
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology
Patient Advocacy
Qualitative Research
Time Factors
Abstract
This paper is a report of a study of the meaning of living alone from the perspective of older people with dementia.
Risks and problems experienced by older women living alone have been investigated mostly through quantitative research. Balancing their safety and autonomy is a serious international community care dilemma. Older people's perspectives have been muted in qualitative research on living alone with dementia.
Using an interpretive phenomenological approach and van Manen's method, 14 interviews were conducted in Ontario, Canada from January 2004 to April 2005 with eight older women diagnosed with Alzheimer disease or a related dementia.
The theme holding back time expressed the temporal meaning of living alone. Pharmacological treatments represented stored time, offering the opportunity to hold back future dreaded time. Past experience with others with dementia was a context for holding on to now and facing some risks of living alone with memory loss. The women acknowledged the limited time remaining for, and identified endpoints to, living alone.
Insight into the impact of past experience with others with dementia could inform nursing assessment and advocacy for health/social services that are sensitive to the potential emotional impact of mixing people with varied levels of dementia in the same programme.
Notes
Comment In: J Adv Nurs. 2010 Sep;66(9):213820740711
PubMed ID
20557395 View in PubMed
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Older men's lay definitions of successful aging over time: the Manitoba follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108708
Source
Int J Aging Hum Dev. 2013;76(4):297-322
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Robert B Tate
Audrey U Swift
Dennis J Bayomi
Author Affiliation
University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada. Robert.Tate@med.umanitoba.ca
Source
Int J Aging Hum Dev. 2013;76(4):297-322
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - psychology
Attitude to Death
Attitude to Health
Bereavement
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - psychology
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Disability Evaluation
Gender Identity
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Independent Living - psychology
Interpersonal Relations
Leisure Activities
Life Style
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Manitoba
Population Dynamics
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Retirement
Veterans - psychology
Abstract
The concept of "successful aging" has become widely accepted in gerontology, yet continues to have no common underlying definition. Researchers have increasingly looked to older individuals for their lay definitions of successful aging. The present analysis is based on responses to five questionnaires administered to surviving participants of the male Manitoba Follow-up Study cohort (www.mfus.ca) in 1996, 2000, 2002, 2004, and 2006 (n = 2,043 men were alive at a mean age of 78 years in 1996). One question on each survey asked: "What is YOUR definition of successful aging?" Applying content analysis to the 5,898 narratives received over the 11 years, we developed a coding system encompassing 21 main themes and 86 sub-themes defining successful aging. We quantitatively analyzed trends in prevalence of themes of successful aging prospectively over time. Our findings empirically support colleagues' past suggestions to shift from defining successful aging in primarily biomedical terms, by taking lay views into account.
PubMed ID
23855184 View in PubMed
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Older persons' reasoning about responsibility for health: variations and predictions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130355
Source
Int J Aging Hum Dev. 2011;73(2):99-124
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Sofia Kjellström
Sara Nora Ross
Author Affiliation
Institute of Gerontology, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Sweden. sofia.kjellstrom@hhj.hj.se
Source
Int J Aging Hum Dev. 2011;73(2):99-124
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Health
Female
Health Transition
Human Development
Humans
Independent Living - psychology
Individuality
Male
Patient Compliance - psychology
Patient Participation - psychology
Personal Construct Theory
Pilot Projects
Problem Solving - ethics
Sick Role - ethics
Sickness Impact Profile
Social Responsibility
Sweden
Abstract
With many Western societies structured for adults to live longer and take responsibility for their health, it is valuable to investigate how older persons reason about this demand. Using mixed methods, this pilot studied how older persons reason about responsibility for health and their responsibility as a patient. Interviews with a small Swedish sample of 65-84 year olds were analyzed for qualitative characteristics and quantitative complexity in reasoning. Using adult development theory, we predicted at least three different stages of performance in reasoning. Results indicated four different stages: two where there is no actual reasoning about health and responsibility, and two where reasoning does occur, each qualitatively different. Results suggest a long-standing blind spot in health studies, that older people do not comprehend responsibility issues in the same way. There are significant implications for closing this gap between demand to take responsibility and capabilities to do so.
PubMed ID
22010360 View in PubMed
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Residential normalcy and environmental experiences of very old people: changes in residential reasoning over time.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104667
Source
J Aging Stud. 2014 Apr;29:9-19
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Marianne Granbom
Ines Himmelsbach
Maria Haak
Charlotte Löfqvist
Frank Oswald
Susanne Iwarsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Box 157, SE-221 00 Lund, Sweden. Electronic address: marianne.granbom@med.lu.se.
Source
J Aging Stud. 2014 Apr;29:9-19
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged, 80 and over - psychology
Attitude to Health
Environment Design
Female
Germany
Homeless Persons - psychology
Housing for the Elderly
Humans
Independent Living - psychology
Interviews as Topic
Loneliness - psychology
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Memory, Long-Term
Object Attachment
Patient Safety
Privacy - psychology
Skilled Nursing Facilities
Social Distance
Social Environment
Sweden
Abstract
The decision to relocate in old age is intricately linked to thoughts and desires to stay put. However, most research focuses either on strategies that allow people to age in place or on their reasons for relocation. There is a need for more knowledge on very old peoples' residential reasoning, including thoughts about aging in place and thoughts about relocation as one intertwined process evolving in everyday life. The aim of this study was to explore what we refer to as the process of residential reasoning and how it changes over time among very old people, and to contribute to the theoretical development regarding aging in place and relocation. Taking a longitudinal perspective, data stem from the ENABLE-AGE In-depth Study, with interviews conducted in 2003 followed up in interviews in 2011. The 16 participants of the present study were 80-89years at the time of the first interview. During analysis the Theoretical Model of Residential Normalcy by Golant and the Life Course Model of Environmental Experience by Rowles & Watkins were used as sensitizing concepts. The findings revealed changes in the process of residential reasoning that related to a wide variety of issues. Such issues included the way very old people use their environmental experience, their striving to build upon or dismiss attachment to place, and their attempts to maintain or regain residential normalcy during years of declining health and loss of independence. In addition, the changes in reasoning were related to end-of-life issues. The findings contribute to the theoretical discussion on aging in place, relocation as a coping strategy, and reattachment after moving in very old age.
PubMed ID
24655669 View in PubMed
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Self-respect through ability to keep fear of frailty at a distance: successful ageing from the perspective of community-dwelling older people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115404
Source
Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being. 2013;8:20194
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Helena M Hörder
Kerstin Frändin
Maria E H Larsson
Author Affiliation
Neuropsychiatric Epidemiology Unit, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden. Helena.Horder@vgregion.se
Source
Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being. 2013;8:20194
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - psychology
Attitude to Health
Fear
Female
Frail Elderly - psychology
Humans
Independent Living - psychology
Male
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
With population ageing, there is an increased interest in how to promote a good old age. A predominant concept in these discussions is successful ageing, which is mainly based on researchers' definitions. This article aims to explore successful ageing from the perspective of community-dwelling older people (24 persons aged 77-90 years). Individual open interviews were conducted and analysed according to qualitative content analysis. An overarching theme was formulated as "self-respect through ability to keep fear of frailty at a distance". This embraced the content of four categories: "having sufficient bodily resources for security and opportunities", "structures that promote security and opportunities", "feeling valuable in relation to the outside world", and "choosing gratitude instead of worries". Ageing seems to be a dynamic process rather than a static structure and might therefore be susceptible to actions. Paying attention to attitudes and treating the older person with respect, particularly with regard to worries about increasing vulnerability, can lead to better ways of promoting successful ageing.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23511089 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.