Skip header and navigation

Refine By

9 records – page 1 of 1.

Aspects of housing and perceived health among ADL independent and ADL dependent groups of older people in three national samples.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113316
Source
Aging Clin Exp Res. 2013 Jun;25(3):317-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Signe Tomsone
Vibeke Horstmann
Frank Oswald
Susanne Iwarsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Box 157, 221 00, Lund, Sweden. Signe.Tomsone@med.lu.se
Source
Aging Clin Exp Res. 2013 Jun;25(3):317-28
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - psychology
Dependency (Psychology)
Female
Geriatric Assessment
Germany
Health status
Housing
Humans
Independent Living - psychology
Latvia
Male
Regression Analysis
Residence Characteristics
Self Concept
Sweden
Abstract
Good housing solutions are important for the ageing population in order to promote health and maintain functional ability. The objective of this study was to investigate whether and how objective and perceived aspects of housing were related to perceived health among ADL independent and ADL dependent groups of older, single-living people within three national samples.
The current study was based on national samples (German, n = 450; Latvian, n = 303; Swedish, n = 397) from the European ENABLE-AGE Project, using data on ADL dependence, perceived health, objective and perceived aspects of housing. Descriptive statistics, correlations and multivariate ordinal regression models were used to analyze the data.
The participants in the ADL dependent groups generally were older, had more functional limitations and perceived their health as poorer compared to ADL independent groups. With regard to perceived housing, usability as well as meaning of home indicators was often lower in the ADL dependent groups, housing satisfaction was at the same level while housing-related external control beliefs were higher. The differences among the national samples were highly significant for both ADL groups, for all variables except number of outdoor environmental barriers in the ADL independent groups. The relations between perceived health on one hand and objective and perceived aspects of housing on the other show great diversities among the ADL groups and the national samples.
The results serve to alert health care practitioners that it is important to draw attention to how older people perceive their housing situation and to the fact that different levels of functional independence demand different interventions.
PubMed ID
23740591 View in PubMed
Less detail

Do Associations Between Perceived Environmental and Individual Characteristics and Walking Limitations Depend on Lower Extremity Performance Level?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291084
Source
J Aging Health. 2017 Jun; 29(4):640-656
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2017
Author
Ritva Sakari
Merja Rantakokko
Erja Portegijs
Susanne Iwarsson
Sarianna Sipilä
Anne Viljanen
Taina Rantanen
Author Affiliation
1 University of Jyvaskyla, Finland.
Source
J Aging Health. 2017 Jun; 29(4):640-656
Date
Jun-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Disability Evaluation
Environment
Female
Geriatric Assessment - methods
Humans
Independent living
Interviews as Topic
Lower Extremity - physiopathology
Male
Mobility Limitation
Perception
Physical Fitness - physiology
Sweden
Task Performance and Analysis
Walking - physiology
Abstract
The aim of this study was to analyze whether the associations between perceived environmental and individual characteristics and perceived walking limitations in older people differ between those with intact and those with poorer lower extremity performance.
Persons aged 75 to 90 ( N = 834) participated in interviews and performance tests in their homes. Standard questionnaires were used to obtain walking difficulties; environmental barriers to and, facilitators of, mobility; and perceived individual hindrances to outdoor mobility. Lower extremity performance was tested using Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB).
Among those with poorer lower extremity performance, the likelihood for advanced walking limitations was, in particular, related to perceived poor safety in the environment, and among those with intact performance to perceived social issues, such as lack of company, as well as to long distances.
The environmental correlates of walking limitations seem to depend on the level of lower extremity performance.
PubMed ID
27056910 View in PubMed
Less detail

Evaluation of housing adaptation interventions: integrating the economic perspective into occupational therapy practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262808
Source
Scand J Occup Ther. 2014 Sep;21(5):323-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
Carlos Chiatti
Susanne Iwarsson
Source
Scand J Occup Ther. 2014 Sep;21(5):323-33
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Architectural Accessibility - economics
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Disability Evaluation
Housing - economics
Humans
Independent living
Occupational Therapy - methods
Program Evaluation
Quality of Life
Self-Help Devices
Sweden
Abstract
The home environment is a key determinant of health, quality of life, and well-being. Given its relevance for such aspects, the scarcity of evaluations of housing adaptation (HA) interventions aimed at removing environmental barriers and accessibility problems in the homes of people with disabilities is surprising. This article aims to contribute to the development of strategies for economic evaluations of HA interventions, by stimulating the dissemination and application of the concepts of effectiveness, cost, and cost-effectiveness as used within health economics.
The focus is limited to three overarching questions for the evaluation of HA interventions. Considering X and Y as two hypothetical interventions for the same individual case, the article asks: (i) Will X be more effective than Y?; (ii) Will X cost more than Y?, and (iii) Will X be more cost-effective than Y? Vignette-like descriptions of fictional cases are used to exemplify the economic concepts explained in the article.
In the conclusion, the need is stressed for new experimental data regarding both costs and outcomes of HA interventions, in order to realize sound evaluations with the potential to inform policy and professionals in this field. Given the heterogeneity among national contexts, systematic approaches applied in a coherent manner could strengthen cross-national research and collaborations.
PubMed ID
24784725 View in PubMed
Less detail

Housing adaptations from the perspectives of Swedish occupational therapists.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119518
Source
Scand J Occup Ther. 2013 May;20(3):228-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Agneta Malmgren Fänge
Katarina Lindberg
Susanne Iwarsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. agneta.malmgren_fange@med.lu.se
Source
Scand J Occup Ther. 2013 May;20(3):228-40
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Case Management - organization & administration
Data Collection
Housing
Humans
Independent living
Needs Assessment
Occupational Therapy - organization & administration - psychology
Perception
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate how occupational therapists in Sweden administer housing adaptation cases, how they perceive the housing adaptation process, and which improvements they consider necessary.
A total of 1 679 occupational therapists employed by the county councils or the local authorities (and involved in housing adaptations) participated in a web-based survey. The survey targeted issues related to referral and needs identification, assessment, certification, case progress feedback, and evaluation.
Less than half of the occupational therapists systematized the assessment prior to intervention and very few conducted any evaluation afterwards. Feedback from workmen or grant managers to the occupational therapists on each case's adaptation progress was often asked for but rarely given. The majority of the participants were satisfied with the housing adaptation process in general, while at the same time they indicated a need for further improvements in the process. Differences between occupational therapists related to employer and year of graduation were found on the majority of the targeted issues.
To conclude, to a very large extent housing adaptations seem to be based on non-standardized procedures for assessment, and only a few of them are evaluated systematically.
PubMed ID
23095046 View in PubMed
Less detail

The influence of participation on mortality in very old age among community-living people in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299016
Source
Aging Clin Exp Res. 2019 Feb; 31(2):265-271
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-2019
Author
Maria Haak
Charlotte Löfqvist
Susann Ullén
Vibeke Horstmann
Susanne Iwarsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Box 157, 221 00, Lund, Sweden. maria.haak@med.lu.se.
Source
Aging Clin Exp Res. 2019 Feb; 31(2):265-271
Date
Feb-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Health promotion
Humans
Independent living
Leisure Activities
Longevity
Male
Proportional Hazards Models
Sweden
Abstract
Participation in everyday life and society is generally seen as essential for health-related outcomes and acknowledged to affect older people's well-being.
To investigate if aspects of performance- and togetherness-related participation influence on mortality among very old single living people in Sweden.
ENABLE-AGE Survey Study data involving single-living participants in Sweden (N?=?314, aged 81-91 years), followed over 10 years were used. Multivariate Cox regression models adjusted for demographic and health-related variables were used to analyse specific items influencing mortality.
Participation in performance- or togetherness-oriented activities was found to significantly influence mortality [HR 0.62 (0.44-0.88), P value 0.006, and HR 0.72 (0.53-0.97), P value 0.031, respectively]. Talking to neighbours and following local politics had a protective effect on mortality, speaking to relatives on the phone (CI 1.10-2.02) and performing leisure activities together with others (CI 1.10-2.00) had the opposite influence. That is, those performing the latter activities were significantly more likely to die earlier.
The main contribution of this study is the facet of the results showing that aspects of performance- and togetherness-related participation have a protective effect on mortality in very old age. This is important knowledge for designing health promotion and preventive efforts for the ageing population. Moreover, it constitutes a contribution to the development of instruments capturing aspects of participation influencing on mortality.
In the development of health promotion and preventive efforts the inclusion of participation facets could be considered in favour of potential positive influences on longevity.
PubMed ID
29679295 View in PubMed
Less detail

Perceived environmental barriers to outdoor mobility and changes in sense of autonomy in participation outdoors among older people: a prospective two-year cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290462
Source
Aging Ment Health. 2017 Aug; 21(8):805-809
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Aug-2017
Author
Merja Rantakokko
Erja Portegijs
Anne Viljanen
Susanne Iwarsson
Markku Kauppinen
Taina Rantanen
Author Affiliation
a Gerontology Research Center and Department of Health Sciences , University of Jyväskylä , Jyväskylä , Finland.
Source
Aging Ment Health. 2017 Aug; 21(8):805-809
Date
Aug-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Community Participation - statistics & numerical data
Environment
Female
Finland
Humans
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Male
Mobility Limitation
Personal Autonomy
Abstract
The aim was to study whether perceived environmental barriers to outdoor mobility affect changes in sense of autonomy in participation outdoors among community-dwelling older people over a two-year period.
Community-dwelling people aged 75-90 years (n = 848) in central Finland were interviewed on two occasions, face-to-face at baseline and over the telephone two years later. Perceived environmental barriers to outdoor mobility were assessed using a 15-item structured questionnaire, and the sum scores categorized into tertiles (0, 1 and 2 or more barriers). Autonomy in participation outdoors was assessed with the 'Impact on Participation and Autonomy' (IPA) questionnaire using the autonomy outdoors subscale (score range 0-20, higher scores indicating more restricted autonomy).
Scores for autonomy in participation outdoors were available for 848 participants at baseline (mean 6.2, SD = 3.8) and for 748 participants at the two-year follow-up (mean 6.7, SD = 3.9). At baseline, those reporting multiple environmental barriers had the most restricted autonomy, while those reporting no environmental barriers had the least restricted autonomy (p
PubMed ID
26979293 View in PubMed
Less detail

Relationships between perceived aspects of home and symptoms in a cohort aged 67-70.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270198
Source
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2015 Nov-Dec;61(3):529-34
Publication Type
Article
Author
Maria Haak
Maya Kylén
Henrik Ekström
Steven M Schmidt
Vibeke Horstmann
Sölve Elmståhl
Susanne Iwarsson
Source
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2015 Nov-Dec;61(3):529-34
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Aged
Aging - psychology
Depression
Female
Health status
Health Surveys
Housing for the Elderly
Humans
Independent Living - psychology
Interviews as Topic
Male
Perception
Personal Satisfaction
Sweden
Abstract
The importance of the home environment increases with age. Perceived aspects of home influence life satisfaction, perceived health, independence in daily activities and well-being among very old people. However, research on health and perceived aspects of home among senior citizens in earlier phases of the aging process is lacking. Therefore, the main aim was to explore whether perceived aspects of home are related to number of and specific domains of symptoms in a cohort of people aged 67-70. Interview and observation data on aspects of home and health, collected with 371 individuals living in ordinary housing in urban as well as rural areas in southern Sweden, were used. Descriptive statistics, correlations, multiple linear and logistic regression models were employed. The results showed that the median number of symptoms was 6.0. Reporting fewer reported symptoms was associated with a higher meaning of home (p=0.003) and lower external housing related control beliefs (p=0.001) but not with usability in the home. High external control beliefs were significantly associated with symptoms from head (p=0.014), gastrointestinal (p=0.014) and tension symptoms (p=0.001). Low meaning of home was significantly associated with heart-lung symptoms (p=0.007), and low usability was associated with depressive symptoms (p=0.003). In conclusion, showing that perceived aspects of home are important for health in terms of physical and mental symptoms, this study contributes to the knowledge on the complex interplay of health and home in the third age.
PubMed ID
26199206 View in PubMed
Less detail

Residential normalcy and environmental experiences of very old people: changes in residential reasoning over time.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104667
Source
J Aging Stud. 2014 Apr;29:9-19
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Marianne Granbom
Ines Himmelsbach
Maria Haak
Charlotte Löfqvist
Frank Oswald
Susanne Iwarsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Box 157, SE-221 00 Lund, Sweden. Electronic address: marianne.granbom@med.lu.se.
Source
J Aging Stud. 2014 Apr;29:9-19
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged, 80 and over - psychology
Attitude to Health
Environment Design
Female
Germany
Homeless Persons - psychology
Housing for the Elderly
Humans
Independent Living - psychology
Interviews as Topic
Loneliness - psychology
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Memory, Long-Term
Object Attachment
Patient Safety
Privacy - psychology
Skilled Nursing Facilities
Social Distance
Social Environment
Sweden
Abstract
The decision to relocate in old age is intricately linked to thoughts and desires to stay put. However, most research focuses either on strategies that allow people to age in place or on their reasons for relocation. There is a need for more knowledge on very old peoples' residential reasoning, including thoughts about aging in place and thoughts about relocation as one intertwined process evolving in everyday life. The aim of this study was to explore what we refer to as the process of residential reasoning and how it changes over time among very old people, and to contribute to the theoretical development regarding aging in place and relocation. Taking a longitudinal perspective, data stem from the ENABLE-AGE In-depth Study, with interviews conducted in 2003 followed up in interviews in 2011. The 16 participants of the present study were 80-89years at the time of the first interview. During analysis the Theoretical Model of Residential Normalcy by Golant and the Life Course Model of Environmental Experience by Rowles & Watkins were used as sensitizing concepts. The findings revealed changes in the process of residential reasoning that related to a wide variety of issues. Such issues included the way very old people use their environmental experience, their striving to build upon or dismiss attachment to place, and their attempts to maintain or regain residential normalcy during years of declining health and loss of independence. In addition, the changes in reasoning were related to end-of-life issues. The findings contribute to the theoretical discussion on aging in place, relocation as a coping strategy, and reattachment after moving in very old age.
PubMed ID
24655669 View in PubMed
Less detail

Task Modifications in Walking Postpone Decline in Life-Space Mobility Among Community-Dwelling Older People: A 2-year Follow-up Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286111
Source
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2017 Sep 01;72(9):1252-1256
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-01-2017
Author
Merja Rantakokko
Erja Portegijs
Anne Viljanen
Susanne Iwarsson
Taina Rantanen
Source
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2017 Sep 01;72(9):1252-1256
Date
Sep-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Disability Evaluation
Female
Finland
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Independent living
Male
Mobility Limitation
Quality of Life
Surveys and Questionnaires
Task Performance and Analysis
Walking - physiology
Abstract
Task modification refers to performing a task differently than before. While task modification in walking may be a sign of looming walking difficulty, it may also be adaptive in and postpone the decline in life-space mobility. However, this has not been studied. This study examined whether changes in life-space mobility over a 2-year period differ between people who at baseline report no walking difficulty and no task modification, those who report no walking difficulty but task modification, and those who report walking difficulty.
Community-dwelling people aged 75-90 years were interviewed face-to-face at baseline (N = 848), and over phone one (n = 816) and two (n = 761) years later. Life-space mobility was assessed annually with the Life-Space Assessment (range 0-120, higher scores indicate better life-space mobility). Self-reported ability to walk 2 km was assessed at baseline and categorized into "no difficulty," "no difficulty but task modifications" (reduced frequency, given up walking, walking slower or resting during walking) and "difficulty." The analyses were adjusted for age, gender, number of chronic conditions, cognitive impairment, lower extremity performance and education.
The life-space mobility score was highest and remained stable over 2-years among those with no walking difficulties at baseline and lowest and showing a steady decline among those with walking difficulties. Those with task modifications formed the middle group. They showed no marked changes in life-space mobility during the first year, but significant decline during the second year.
Task modifications in walking may help community-dwelling older people to postpone life-space mobility decline.
PubMed ID
28329074 View in PubMed
Less detail

9 records – page 1 of 1.