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Mobility Limitation and Changes in Personal Goals Among Older Women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271854
Source
J Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci. 2016 Jan;71(1):1-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
Milla Saajanaho
Anne Viljanen
Sanna Read
Johanna Eronen
Jaakko Kaprio
Marja Jylhä
Taina Rantanen
Source
J Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci. 2016 Jan;71(1):1-10
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Aged
Aging - physiology - psychology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Geriatric Assessment - methods
Goals
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Interpersonal Relations
Longitudinal Studies
Mobility Limitation
Motor Activity
Psychomotor Performance
Abstract
Several theoretical viewpoints suggest that older adults need to modify their personal goals in the face of functional decline. The aim of this study was to investigate longitudinally the association of mobility limitation with changes in personal goals among older women.
Eight-year follow-up of 205 women aged 66-78 years at baseline.
Health-related goals were the most common at both measurements. Goals related to independent living almost doubled and goals related to exercise and to cultural activities substantially decreased during the follow-up. Higher age decreased the likelihood for engaging in new goals related to cultural activities and disengaging from goals related to independent living. Women who had developed mobility limitation during the follow-up were less likely to engage in new goals related to exercise and more likely to disengage from goals related to cultural activities and to health and functioning.
The results of this study support theories suggesting that age-related losses such as mobility limitation may result in older adults modifying or disengaging from personal goals.
PubMed ID
25123689 View in PubMed
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Older women's personal goals and exercise activity: an 8-year follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103083
Source
J Aging Phys Act. 2014 Jul;22(3):386-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2014
Author
Milla Saajanaho
Anne Viljanen
Sanna Read
Merja Rantakokko
Li-Tang Tsai
Jaakko Kaprio
Marja Jylhä
Taina Rantanen
Author Affiliation
Gerontology Research Center, Dept. of Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
Source
J Aging Phys Act. 2014 Jul;22(3):386-92
Date
Jul-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Exercise
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Goals
Health Behavior
Humans
Independent living
Risk Reduction Behavior
Self Report
Abstract
This study investigated the associations of personal goals with exercise activity, as well as the relationships between exercise-related and other personal goals, among older women. Both cross-sectional and longitudinal designs were used with a sample of 308 women ages 66-79 at baseline. Women who reported exercise-related personal goals were 4 times as likely to report high exercise activity at baseline than those who did not report exercise-related goals. Longitudinal results were parallel. Goals related to cultural activities, as well as to busying oneself around the home, coincided with exercise-related goals, whereas goals related to own and other people's health and independent living lowered the odds of having exercise-related goals. Helping older adults to set realistic exercise-related goals that are compatible with their other life goals may yield an increase in their exercise activity, but this should be evaluated in a controlled trial.
PubMed ID
23945665 View in PubMed
Less detail

Sense of coherence: effect on adherence and response to resistance training in older people with hip fracture history.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115151
Source
J Aging Phys Act. 2014 Jan;22(1):138-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Erja Portegijs
Sanna Read
Inka Pakkala
Mauri Kallinen
Ari Heinonen
Taina Rantanen
Markku Alen
Ilkka Kiviranta
Sanna Sihvonen
Sarianna Sipilä
Author Affiliation
Gerontology Research Center and Dept. of Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
Source
J Aging Phys Act. 2014 Jan;22(1):138-45
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Finland
Hip Fractures - physiopathology - psychology - rehabilitation
Humans
Independent living
Male
Mobility Limitation
Muscle Strength - physiology
Needs Assessment
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Patient Compliance - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Resistance Training - methods - statistics & numerical data
Sense of Coherence
Social Support
Walking - physiology
Abstract
Our aim was to study the effects of sense of coherence (SOC) on training adherence and interindividual changes in muscle strength, mobility, and balance after resistance training in older people with hip fracture history. These are secondary analyses of a 12-week randomized controlled trial of progressive resistance training in 60- to 85-year-old community-dwelling people 0.5-7 years after hip fracture (n = 45; ISRCTN34271567). Pre- and posttrial assessments included SOC, knee extension strength, walking speed, timed up-and-go (TUG), and Berg Balance Scale (BBS). Group-by-SOC interaction effects (repeated-measures ANOVA) were statistically significant for TUG (p = .005) and BBS (p = .040), but not for knee extension strength or walking speed. Weaker SOC was associated with poorer training adherence (mixed model; p = .009). Thus, more complicated physical tasks did not improve in those with weaker SOC, independently of training adherence. Older people with weaker SOC may need additional psychosocial support in physical rehabilitation programs to optimize training response.
PubMed ID
23538559 View in PubMed
Less detail