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Anticholinergic drug use and its association with self-reported symptoms among older persons with and without diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298928
Source
J Clin Pharm Ther. 2019 Apr; 44(2):229-235
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2019
Author
Niina-Mari Inkeri
Merja Karjalainen
Maija Haanpää
Hannu Kautiainen
Juha Saltevo
Pekka Mäntyselkä
Miia Tiihonen
Author Affiliation
School of Pharmacy, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
J Clin Pharm Ther. 2019 Apr; 44(2):229-235
Date
Apr-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cholinergic Antagonists - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Female
Finland
Humans
Independent living
Male
Practice Patterns, Physicians' - statistics & numerical data
Primary Health Care
Self Report
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Anticholinergic drug use has been associated with a risk of central and peripheral adverse effects. There is a lack of information on anticholinergic drug use in persons with diabetes. The aim of this study is to investigate anticholinergic drug use and the association between anticholinergic drug use and self-reported symptoms in older community-dwelling persons with and without diabetes.
The basic population was comprised of Finnish community-dwelling primary care patients aged 65 and older. Persons with diabetes were identified according to the ICD-10 diagnostic codes from electronic patient records. Two controls adjusted by age and gender were selected for each person with diabetes. This cross-sectional study was based on electronic primary care patient records and a structured health questionnaire. The health questionnaire was returned by 430 (81.6%) persons with diabetes and 654 (73.5%) persons without diabetes. Data on prescribed drugs were obtained from the electronic patient records. Anticholinergic drug use was measured according to the Anticholinergic Risk Scale. The presence and strength of anticholinergic symptoms were asked in the health questionnaire.
The prevalence of anticholinergic drug use was 8.9% in the total study cohort. There were no significant differences in anticholinergic drug use between persons with and without diabetes. There was no consistent association between anticholinergic drug use and self-reported symptoms.
There is no difference in anticholinergic drug use in older community-dwelling persons with and without diabetes. Anticholinergic drug use should be considered individually and monitored carefully.
PubMed ID
30315583 View in PubMed
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Effects of 12-month home-based physiotherapy on duration of living at home and functional capacity among older persons with signs of frailty or with a recent hip fracture - protocol of a randomized controlled trial (HIPFRA study).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301757
Source
BMC Geriatr. 2018 10 01; 18(1):232
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
10-01-2018
Author
Paula Soukkio
Sara Suikkanen
Sanna Kääriä
Hannu Kautiainen
Sarianna Sipilä
Katriina Kukkonen-Harjula
Markku Hupli
Author Affiliation
Rehabilitation, South Karelia Social and Health Care District, Valto Käkelän katu 3, FI-53130, Lappeenranta, Finland. paula.soukkio@eksote.fi.
Source
BMC Geriatr. 2018 10 01; 18(1):232
Date
10-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Accidental Falls - prevention & control
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Frail Elderly - psychology
Hip Fractures - epidemiology - psychology - rehabilitation
Home Care Services - trends
Humans
Independent Living - psychology - trends
Male
Nutrition Assessment
Physical Therapy Modalities - psychology - trends
Quality of Life - psychology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Health concerns, such as frailty and osteoporotic fractures decrease functional capacity and increase use of health and social care services in the aging population. The ability to continue living at home is dependent on functional capacity, which can be enhanced by rehabilitation. We study the effects of a 12-month home-based physiotherapy program with 12-month follow-up on duration of living at home, functional capacity, and the use of social and health care services among older persons with signs of frailty, or with a recently operated hip fracture.
This is a non-blinded, parallel group, randomized controlled trial performed in South Karelia Social and Health Care District, Finland (population 131,000). Three hundred community-dwelling older persons with signs of frailty (age?=?65) and 300 persons with a recent hip fracture (age?=?60) will be recruited. Frailty is screened by FRAIL questionnaire and verified by modified Fried's frailty criteria. Both patient groups will be randomized separately to a physiotherapy and a usual care arm. Individualized, structured and progressive physiotherapy will be carried out for 60 min, twice a week for 12 months at the participant's home. The primary outcome at 24 months is duration of living at home. Our hypothesis is that persons assigned to the physiotherapy arm will live at home for six months longer than those in the usual care arm. Secondary outcomes are functional capacity, frailty status, health-related quality-of-life, falls, use and costs of social and health care services, and mortality. Assessments, among others Short Physical Performance Battery, Functional Independence Measure, Mini Nutritional Assessment, and Mini-Mental State Examination will be performed at the participant's home at baseline, 3, 6, and 12 months. Register data on the use and costs of social and health care services, and mortality will be monitored for 24 months.
Our trial will provide new knowledge on the potential of intensive, long-term home-based physiotherapy among older persons at risk for disabilities, to enhance functional capacity and thereby to postpone the need for institutional care, and diminish the use of social and health care services.
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02305433 , Registered Nov 28, 2014.
PubMed ID
30285645 View in PubMed
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Effects of Cognitive Training on Cognition and Quality of Life of Older Persons with Dementia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302899
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2018 04; 66(4):664-670
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-2018
Author
Eeva-Liisa Kallio
Hannareeta Öhman
Marja Hietanen
Helena Soini
Timo E Strandberg
Hannu Kautiainen
Kaisu H Pitkälä
Author Affiliation
Department of General Practice and Primary Health Care, University of Helsinki, and Unit of Primary Health Care, Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2018 04; 66(4):664-670
Date
04-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged, 80 and over
Cognition - physiology
Cognitive Behavioral Therapy - methods
Dementia - therapy
Female
Finland
Humans
Independent living
Male
Neuropsychological Tests - statistics & numerical data
Quality of Life - psychology
Single-Blind Method
Abstract
To evaluate the effect of cognitive training on cognition and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in community-dwelling persons with dementia.
Single-blind randomized controlled trial with 3- and 9-month follow-up.
Adult day care centers in Helsinki, Finland.
Older individuals with mild to moderate dementia living at home and attending adult day care twice a week (N = 147; mean age 83, 72% female, 63% at mild stage of dementia).
A systematic 12-week training program focused on subskills of executive function: attention, working memory, cognitive flexibility, and planning. The intervention group (n = 76) underwent cognitive training twice a week for 45 minutes, and the control group (n = 71) attended day care as usual.
Primary outcomes were the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive subscale (ADAS-Cog) for global cognition and the 15-dimensional instrument (15D) for HRQoL. The outcomes were measured at baseline and 3 and 9 months.
Both groups deteriorated in global cognition and HRQoL during follow-up, and there were no differences between the two groups in change on the ADAS-Cog (P = .43) or 15D (P = .61) over time (adjusted for age and sex). At 3 months, changes were 0.8 (95% confidence interval (CI) = -0.2-1.8) for the intervention group and 1.7 (95% CI = 0.6-2.7) for the control group on the ADAS-Cog and -0.040 (95% CI = -0.058 to -0.021) for the intervention group and -0.037 (95% CI = -0.056 to -0.018) for the control group on the 15D.
Systematic cognitive training had no effect on global cognition or HRQoL in community-living persons with mild to moderate dementia.
Notes
CommentIn: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2018 Apr;66(4):645-647 PMID 29345742
PubMed ID
29345724 View in PubMed
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Effects of the Finnish Alzheimer disease exercise trial (FINALEX): a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114708
Source
JAMA Intern Med. 2013 May 27;173(10):894-901
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-27-2013
Author
Kaisu H Pitkälä
Minna M Pöysti
Marja-Liisa Laakkonen
Reijo S Tilvis
Niina Savikko
Hannu Kautiainen
Timo E Strandberg
Author Affiliation
Unit of Primary Health Care, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Finland. kaisu.pitkala@helsinki.fi
Source
JAMA Intern Med. 2013 May 27;173(10):894-901
Date
May-27-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - economics - therapy
Caregivers
Day Care - economics - organization & administration
Exercise Therapy - economics - methods - organization & administration
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
House Calls - economics
Humans
Independent living
Male
Physical Therapists
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Few rigorous clinical trials have investigated the effectiveness of exercise on the physical functioning of patients with Alzheimer disease (AD).
To investigate the effects of intense and long-term exercise on the physical functioning and mobility of home-dwelling patients with AD and to explore its effects on the use and costs of health and social services.
A randomized controlled trial.
A total of 210 home-dwelling patients with AD living with their spousal caregiver.
The 3 trial arms included (1) group-based exercise (GE; 4-hour sessions with approximately 1-hour training) and (2) tailored home-based exercise (HE; 1-hour training), both twice a week for 1 year, and (3) a control group (CG) receiving the usual community care.
The Functional Independence Measure (FIM), the Short Physical Performance Battery, and information on the use and costs of social and health care services.
All groups deteriorated in functioning during the year after randomization, but deterioration was significantly faster in the CG than in the HE or GE group at 6 (P = .003) and 12 (P = .015) months. The FIM changes at 12 months were -7.1 (95% CI, -3.7 to -10.5), -10.3 (95% CI, -6.7 to -13.9), and -14.4 (95% CI, -10.9 to -18.0) in the HE group, GE group, and CG, respectively. The HE and GE groups had significantly fewer falls than the CG during the follow-up year. The total costs of health and social services for the HE patient-caregiver dyads (in US dollars per dyad per year) were $25,112 (95% CI, $17,642 to $32,581) (P = .13 for comparison with the CG), $22,066 in the GE group ($15,931 to $28,199; P = .03 vs CG), and $34,121 ($24,559 to $43,681) in the CG.
An intensive and long-term exercise program had beneficial effects on the physical functioning of patients with AD without increasing the total costs of health and social services or causing any significant adverse effects.
anzctr.org.au Identifier: ACTRN12608000037303.
Notes
Comment In: Ann Intern Med. 2013 Aug 20;159(4):JC1024026274
Comment In: MMW Fortschr Med. 2013 Nov 7;155(19):3224475662
Comment In: JAMA Intern Med. 2013 May 27;173(10):901-223588877
PubMed ID
23589097 View in PubMed
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Exercise rehabilitation on home-dwelling patients with Alzheimer's disease--a randomized, controlled trial. Study protocol.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140239
Source
Trials. 2010;11:92
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Kaisu H Pitkala
Minna M Raivio
Marja-Liisa Laakkonen
Reijo S Tilvis
Hannu Kautiainen
Timo E Strandberg
Author Affiliation
Unit of General Practice, Helsinki University Central Hospital, University of Helsinki, PO Box 20, 00014 University of Helsinki, Finland. kaisu.pitkala@kolumbus.fi
Source
Trials. 2010;11:92
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alzheimer Disease - economics - physiopathology - psychology - rehabilitation
Caregivers
Clinical Protocols
Cognition
Cost of Illness
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Day Care - economics
Depression - etiology
Disability Evaluation
Exercise Therapy - economics
Finland
Frail Elderly
Health Care Costs
Humans
Independent living
Mobility Limitation
Neuropsychological Tests
Postural Balance
Quality of Life
Research Design
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Walking
Abstract
Besides cognitive decline, Alzheimer's disease (AD) leads to physical disability, need for help and permanent institutional care. The trials investigating effects of exercise rehabilitation on physical functioning of home-dwelling older dementia patients are still scarce. The aim of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of intensive exercise rehabilitation lasting for one year on mobility and physical functioning of home-dwelling patients with AD.
During years 2008-2010, patients with AD (n = 210) living with their spousal caregiver in community are recruited using central AD registers in Finland, and they are offered exercise rehabilitation lasting for one year. The patients are randomized into three arms: 1) tailored home-based exercise twice weekly 2) group-based exercise twice weekly in rehabilitation center 3) control group with usual care and information of exercise and nutrition. Main outcome measures will be Guralnik's mobility and balance tests and FIM-test to assess physical functioning. Secondary measures will be cognition, neuropsychiatric symptoms according to the Neuropsychiatric Inventory, caregivers' burden, depression and health-related quality of life (RAND-36). Data concerning admissions to institutional care and the use and costs of health and social services will be collected during a two year follow-up.
To our knowledge this is the first large scale trial exploring whether home-dwelling patients with AD will benefit from intense and long-lasting exercise rehabilitation in respect to their mobility and physical functioning. It will also provide data on cost-effectiveness of the intervention.
ACTRN12608000037303.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20925948 View in PubMed
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Glycemic control and health-related quality of life among older home-dwelling primary care patients with diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293508
Source
Prim Care Diabetes. 2017 Dec; 11(6):577-582
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2017
Author
Anna-Kaisa Aro
Merja Karjalainen
Miia Tiihonen
Hannu Kautiainen
Juha Saltevo
Maija Haanpää
Pekka Mäntyselkä
Author Affiliation
Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, General Practice, University of Eastern Finland, Finland; Rantakylä Health Center, Siunsote, Finland. Electronic address: koistine@student.uef.fi.
Source
Prim Care Diabetes. 2017 Dec; 11(6):577-582
Date
Dec-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Biomarkers - blood
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Cognition
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus - blood - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Female
Finland
Geriatric Assessment
Glycated Hemoglobin A - metabolism
Humans
Independent living
Male
Mental health
Mental Status and Dementia Tests
Mobility Limitation
Predictive value of tests
Primary Health Care
Quality of Life
Risk factors
Self Care - methods
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To evaluate the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and functional capacity in relation to glycemic control among older home-dwelling primary care patients.
Electronic patient records were used to identify 527 people over 65 years with diabetes. Of these, 259 randomly selected subjects were invited to a health examination and 172 of them attended and provided complete data. The participants were divided into three groups based on the HbA1c: good (HbA1c57mmol/mol (N=29)) glycemic control. HRQoL was measured with the EuroQol EQ-5D questionnaire. Functional and cognitive capacity and mental well-being were assessed with the Lawton Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL) scale, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15).
EQ-5D scores for good, intermediate and poor glycemic control were 0.78; 0.74 and 0.70, p=0.037. Sub-items of mobility (p=0.002) and self-care were the most affected (p=0.031). Corresponding trend was found for IADL, p=0.008. A significant correlation was found between MMSE scores and HbA1c.
Older primary care home-dwelling patients with diabetes and poorer glycemic control have lower functional capacity and HRQoL, especially in regard to mobility and self-care.
PubMed ID
28754430 View in PubMed
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Living Alone with Alzheimer's Disease: Data from SveDem, the Swedish Dementia Registry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292004
Source
J Alzheimers Dis. 2017; 58(4):1265-1272
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2017
Author
Pavla Cermakova
Maja Nelson
Juraj Secnik
Sara Garcia-Ptacek
Kristina Johnell
Johan Fastbom
Lena Kilander
Bengt Winblad
Maria Eriksdotter
Dorota Religa
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences andSociety, Division of Neurogeriatrics, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
J Alzheimers Dis. 2017; 58(4):1265-1272
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - drug therapy - epidemiology - psychology
Antidepressive Agents
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Dementia - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Independent living
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Registries
Social Conditions
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Many people with Alzheimer's disease (AD) live alone in their own homes. There is a lack of knowledge about whether these individuals receive the same quality of diagnostics and treatment for AD as patients who are cohabiting.
To investigate the diagnostic work-up and treatment of community-dwelling AD patients who live alone.
We performed a cross-sectional cohort study based on data from the Swedish Dementia Registry (SveDem). We studied patients diagnosed with AD between 2007 and 2015 (n?=?26,163). Information about drugs and comorbidities was acquired from the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register and the Swedish Patient Register.
11,878 (46%) patients lived alone, primarily older women. After adjusting for confounders, living alone was inversely associated with receiving computed tomography (OR 0.90; 95% CI 0.82-0.99), magnetic resonance imaging (OR 0.91; 95% CI 0.83-0.99), and lumbar puncture (OR 0.86; 95% CI 0.80-0.92). Living alone was also negatively associated with the use of cholinesterase inhibitors (OR 0.81; 95% CI 0.76; 0.87), memantine (OR 0.77; 95% CI 0.72; 0.83), and cardiovascular medication (OR 0.92; 0.86; 0.99). On the other hand, living alone was positively associated with the use of antidepressants (OR 1.15; 95% CI 1.08; 1.22), antipsychotics (OR 1.41; 95% CI 1.25; 1.58), and hypnotics and sedatives (OR 1.09; 95% CI 1.02; 1.17).
Solitary living AD patients do not receive the same extent of care as those who are cohabiting.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28550260 View in PubMed
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Modifiable midlife risk factors, independent aging, and survival in older men: report on long-term follow-up of the Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265380
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2015 May;63(5):877-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Kristin Franzon
Björn Zethelius
Tommy Cederholm
Lena Kilander
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2015 May;63(5):877-85
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Independent living
Life Style
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Survival Rate
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
To examine relationships between modifiable midlife factors, aging, and physical and cognitive function (independent aging) and survival in very old age.
Prospective cohort.
Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men, Uppsala, Sweden.
Swedish men investigated in 1970-74 (aged 48.6-51.1) and followed up for four decades (N=2,293).
Conventional cardiovascular risk factors, body mass index (BMI), and dietary biomarkers were measured, and a questionnaire was used to gather information on lifestyle variables at age 50. Four hundred seventy-two men were reinvestigated in 2008-09 (aged 84.8-88.9). Independent aging was defined as survival to age 85, Mini-Mental State Examination score of 25 or greater, not living in an institution, independent in personal care and hygiene, able to walk outdoors without personal help, and no diagnosis of dementia. The National Swedish Death Registry provided survival data.
Thirty-eight percent of the cohort survived to age 85. Seventy-four percent of the participants in 2008-09 were aging independently. In univariable analyses, high leisure-time physical activity predicted survival but not independent aging. Low work-time physical activity was associated more strongly with independent aging (odds ratio (OR)=1.84, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.18-2.88) than with survival (OR=1.27, 95% CI=1.05-1.52). In multivariable analyses, midlife BMI was negatively associated (OR=0.80/SD, 95% CI=0.65-0.99/SD), and never or former smoking was positively associated (OR=1.66, 95% CI=1.07-2.59), with independent aging. As expected, conventional cardiovascular and lifestyle risk factors were associated with mortality.
A normal midlife BMI and not smoking were associated with independent aging close to four decades later, indicating that normal weight at midlife has the potential not only to increase survival, but also to preserve independence with aging.
PubMed ID
25919442 View in PubMed
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Predictors of Independent Aging and Survival: A 16-Year Follow-Up Report in Octogenarian Men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286089
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2017 Sep;65(9):1953-1960
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2017
Author
Kristin Franzon
Liisa Byberg
Per Sjögren
Björn Zethelius
Tommy Cederholm
Lena Kilander
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2017 Sep;65(9):1953-1960
Date
Sep-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Cardiovascular Diseases - prevention & control
Diet, Mediterranean
Exercise
Follow-Up Studies
Health Behavior
Humans
Independent living
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Risk factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
To examine the longitudinal associations between aging with preserved functionality, i.e. independent aging and survival, and lifestyle variables, dietary pattern and cardiovascular risk factors.
Cohort study.
Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men, Sweden.
Swedish men (n = 1,104) at a mean age of 71 (range 69.4-74.1) were investigated, 369 of whom were evaluated for independent aging 16 years later, at a mean age of 87 (range 84.8-88.9).
A questionnaire was used to obtain information on lifestyle, including education, living conditions, and physical activity. Adherence to a Mediterranean-like diet was assessed according to a modified Mediterranean Diet Score derived from 7-day food records. Cardiovascular risk factors were measured. Independent aging at a mean age of 87 was defined as lack of diagnosed dementia, a Mini-Mental State Examination score of 25 or greater, not institutionalized, independence in personal activities of daily living, and ability to walk outdoors alone. Complete survival data at age 85 were obtained from the Swedish Cause of Death Register.
Fifty-seven percent of the men survived to age 85, and 75% of the participants at a mean age of 87 displayed independent aging. Independent aging was associated with never smoking (vs current) (odds ratio (OR) = 2.20, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.05-4.60) and high (vs low) adherence to a Mediterranean-like diet (OR = 2.69, 95% CI = 1.14-6.80). Normal weight or overweight and waist circumference of 102 cm or less were also associated with independent aging. Similar associations were observed with survival.
Lifestyle factors such as never smoking, maintaining a healthy diet, and not being obese at age 71 were associated with survival and independent aging at age 85 and older in men.
PubMed ID
28685810 View in PubMed
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