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The influence of participation on mortality in very old age among community-living people in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299016
Source
Aging Clin Exp Res. 2019 Feb; 31(2):265-271
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-2019
Author
Maria Haak
Charlotte Löfqvist
Susann Ullén
Vibeke Horstmann
Susanne Iwarsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Box 157, 221 00, Lund, Sweden. maria.haak@med.lu.se.
Source
Aging Clin Exp Res. 2019 Feb; 31(2):265-271
Date
Feb-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Health promotion
Humans
Independent living
Leisure Activities
Longevity
Male
Proportional Hazards Models
Sweden
Abstract
Participation in everyday life and society is generally seen as essential for health-related outcomes and acknowledged to affect older people's well-being.
To investigate if aspects of performance- and togetherness-related participation influence on mortality among very old single living people in Sweden.
ENABLE-AGE Survey Study data involving single-living participants in Sweden (N?=?314, aged 81-91 years), followed over 10 years were used. Multivariate Cox regression models adjusted for demographic and health-related variables were used to analyse specific items influencing mortality.
Participation in performance- or togetherness-oriented activities was found to significantly influence mortality [HR 0.62 (0.44-0.88), P value 0.006, and HR 0.72 (0.53-0.97), P value 0.031, respectively]. Talking to neighbours and following local politics had a protective effect on mortality, speaking to relatives on the phone (CI 1.10-2.02) and performing leisure activities together with others (CI 1.10-2.00) had the opposite influence. That is, those performing the latter activities were significantly more likely to die earlier.
The main contribution of this study is the facet of the results showing that aspects of performance- and togetherness-related participation have a protective effect on mortality in very old age. This is important knowledge for designing health promotion and preventive efforts for the ageing population. Moreover, it constitutes a contribution to the development of instruments capturing aspects of participation influencing on mortality.
In the development of health promotion and preventive efforts the inclusion of participation facets could be considered in favour of potential positive influences on longevity.
PubMed ID
29679295 View in PubMed
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[Medication use among community-dwelling older Icelanders. Population-based study in urban and rural areas].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129175
Source
Laeknabladid. 2011 Dec;97(12):675-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Arun K Sigurdardottir
Solveig Asa Arnadottir
Elín Díanna Gunnarsdottir
Author Affiliation
arun@unak.is
Source
Laeknabladid. 2011 Dec;97(12):675-80
Date
Dec-2011
Language
Icelandic
Geographic Location
Iceland
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Drug Therapy - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Behavior
Health Care Surveys
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Iceland
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Male
Polypharmacy
Prescription Drugs - therapeutic use
Questionnaires
Registries
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Sex Factors
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To describe medication use among older community-dwelling Icelanders by collecting information on number of medicine, polypharmacy (>5 medications), and medications by ATC categories. Moreover, to explore the relationship between medication use and various influential factors emphasizing residency in urban and rural areas.
Population-based, cross-sectional study. Participants were randomly selected from the National registry in one urban (n=118) and two rural (n=68) areas.
1) = 65 years old, 2) community-dwelling, 3) able to communicate verbally. Information on medication use was obtained from each person's medication list and interviews. A questionnaire and five standardized instruments were used to assess the potential influencing factors.
On average, participants used 3.9 medications and prevalence of polypharmacy was 41%. Men used 3.5 medications on average and women 4.4 (p=0.018). Compared to rural residents, urban residents had fewer medical diagnoses, better mobility, less pain, and fewer depressive symptoms. By controlling for the effects of these variables, more medications were associated with urban living (p
PubMed ID
22133526 View in PubMed
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Relationships between perceived aspects of home and symptoms in a cohort aged 67-70.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270198
Source
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2015 Nov-Dec;61(3):529-34
Publication Type
Article
Author
Maria Haak
Maya Kylén
Henrik Ekström
Steven M Schmidt
Vibeke Horstmann
Sölve Elmståhl
Susanne Iwarsson
Source
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2015 Nov-Dec;61(3):529-34
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Aged
Aging - psychology
Depression
Female
Health status
Health Surveys
Housing for the Elderly
Humans
Independent Living - psychology
Interviews as Topic
Male
Perception
Personal Satisfaction
Sweden
Abstract
The importance of the home environment increases with age. Perceived aspects of home influence life satisfaction, perceived health, independence in daily activities and well-being among very old people. However, research on health and perceived aspects of home among senior citizens in earlier phases of the aging process is lacking. Therefore, the main aim was to explore whether perceived aspects of home are related to number of and specific domains of symptoms in a cohort of people aged 67-70. Interview and observation data on aspects of home and health, collected with 371 individuals living in ordinary housing in urban as well as rural areas in southern Sweden, were used. Descriptive statistics, correlations, multiple linear and logistic regression models were employed. The results showed that the median number of symptoms was 6.0. Reporting fewer reported symptoms was associated with a higher meaning of home (p=0.003) and lower external housing related control beliefs (p=0.001) but not with usability in the home. High external control beliefs were significantly associated with symptoms from head (p=0.014), gastrointestinal (p=0.014) and tension symptoms (p=0.001). Low meaning of home was significantly associated with heart-lung symptoms (p=0.007), and low usability was associated with depressive symptoms (p=0.003). In conclusion, showing that perceived aspects of home are important for health in terms of physical and mental symptoms, this study contributes to the knowledge on the complex interplay of health and home in the third age.
PubMed ID
26199206 View in PubMed
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Residential normalcy and environmental experiences of very old people: changes in residential reasoning over time.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104667
Source
J Aging Stud. 2014 Apr;29:9-19
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Marianne Granbom
Ines Himmelsbach
Maria Haak
Charlotte Löfqvist
Frank Oswald
Susanne Iwarsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Box 157, SE-221 00 Lund, Sweden. Electronic address: marianne.granbom@med.lu.se.
Source
J Aging Stud. 2014 Apr;29:9-19
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged, 80 and over - psychology
Attitude to Health
Environment Design
Female
Germany
Homeless Persons - psychology
Housing for the Elderly
Humans
Independent Living - psychology
Interviews as Topic
Loneliness - psychology
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Memory, Long-Term
Object Attachment
Patient Safety
Privacy - psychology
Skilled Nursing Facilities
Social Distance
Social Environment
Sweden
Abstract
The decision to relocate in old age is intricately linked to thoughts and desires to stay put. However, most research focuses either on strategies that allow people to age in place or on their reasons for relocation. There is a need for more knowledge on very old peoples' residential reasoning, including thoughts about aging in place and thoughts about relocation as one intertwined process evolving in everyday life. The aim of this study was to explore what we refer to as the process of residential reasoning and how it changes over time among very old people, and to contribute to the theoretical development regarding aging in place and relocation. Taking a longitudinal perspective, data stem from the ENABLE-AGE In-depth Study, with interviews conducted in 2003 followed up in interviews in 2011. The 16 participants of the present study were 80-89years at the time of the first interview. During analysis the Theoretical Model of Residential Normalcy by Golant and the Life Course Model of Environmental Experience by Rowles & Watkins were used as sensitizing concepts. The findings revealed changes in the process of residential reasoning that related to a wide variety of issues. Such issues included the way very old people use their environmental experience, their striving to build upon or dismiss attachment to place, and their attempts to maintain or regain residential normalcy during years of declining health and loss of independence. In addition, the changes in reasoning were related to end-of-life issues. The findings contribute to the theoretical discussion on aging in place, relocation as a coping strategy, and reattachment after moving in very old age.
PubMed ID
24655669 View in PubMed
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Socioeconomic status and differences in medication use among older people according to ATC categories and urban-rural residency.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116344
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2013 May;41(3):311-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Arun K Sigurdardottir
Solveig A Arnadottir
Elin Dianna Gunnarsdottir
Author Affiliation
University of Akureyri, Solborg, Nordurslod, Akureyri, Iceland. arun@unak.is
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2013 May;41(3):311-7
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Iceland
Independent living
Male
Pharmaceutical Preparations - classification
Polypharmacy
Qualitative Research
Risk factors
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Social Class
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To study how selected indicators of socioeconomic status and urban-rural residency associate with medication use in form of number of daily medications, polypharmacy, and medication use according to Anatomic Therapeutic Classification (ATC) system.
Cross-sectional, population-based study among older community-dwelling Icelanders. Criteria for participation were: age =65 years, community-dwelling, and able to communicate verbally and to set up a time for a face-to-face interview. Information on medication use was obtained by interviews and by examining each person's medication record. Medications were categorised according to ATC system. A questionnaire and the physical and mental health summary scales of SF-36 Health Survey were used to assess potential influential factors associated with medication use.
On average, participants (n=186) used 3.9 medications, and the prevalence of polypharmacy was 41%. No indicators of socioeconomic status had significant association to any aspects of medication use. Compared to urban residents, rural residents had more diagnosed diseases, were less likely to live alone, were less likely to report having adequate income, and had fewer years of education. Controlling for these differences, urban people were more likely to use medication from the B and C categories. Moreover, older urban men, with worse physical health, and greater number of diagnosed diseases used more medications from the B category.
There are unexplained regional differences in medications use, from categories B and C, by older Icelanders. Further studies are needed on why urban residents used equal number of medications, or even more medications, compared to rural residents, despite better socioeconomic status and fewer diagnosed diseases.
PubMed ID
23406652 View in PubMed
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