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170 records – page 1 of 17.

Provinces call for improved senior care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106826
Source
CMAJ. 2013 Nov 5;185(16):E752
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-5-2013
Source
Pages 515-517 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
  1 document  
Author
Jónsdóttir, S
Jonsdottir, S
Author Affiliation
Reykjavík Social Service Office, Reykjavík, Iceland
Source
Pages 515-517 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Date
1994
Language
English
Geographic Location
Denmark
Finland
Iceland
Norway
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Denmark
Elderly women
Finland
Health
Iceland
Independent living
Nordic countries
Norway
Old women
Sweden
Abstract
Never before in world history have so many individuals been living alone and independently. The welfare state has made this development possible, and in the Nordic countries this is very much true for older women.
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[Management of immobilization in the elderly. A program of mobility and walking adapted for the elderly in the Cité-de-la-Santé of Laval].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127435
Source
Perspect Infirm. 2012 Jan-Feb;9(1):37
Publication Type
Article

From social network to safety net: Dementia-friendly communities in rural northern Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274312
Source
Dementia (London). 2016 Jan;15(1):51-68
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
Elaine C Wiersma
Alison Denton
Source
Dementia (London). 2016 Jan;15(1):51-68
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Dementia - psychology - therapy
Female
Humans
Independent living
Interviews as Topic
Male
Ontario
Rural Population
Social Support
Abstract
Dementia-friendly communities, as communities that enable people with dementia to remain involved and active and have control over their lives for as long as possible, centrally involve social support and social networks for people living with dementia. The purpose of this research was to explore and understand the context of dementia in rural northern communities in Ontario with an emphasis on understanding how dementia friendly the communities were. Using qualitative methods, interviews were conducted with a total of 71 participants, including 37 health service providers, 15 care partners, 2 people living with dementia and 17 other community members such as local business owners, volunteers, local leaders, friends and neighbours. The strong social networks and informal social support that were available to people living with dementia, and the strong commitment by community members, families and health care providers to support people with dementia, were considered a significant asset to the community. A culture of care and looking out for each other contributed to the social support provided. In particular, the familiarity with others provided a supportive community environment. People with dementia were looked out for by community members, and continued to remain connected in their communities. The social support provided in these communities demonstrated that although fragile, this type of support offered somewhat of a safety net for individuals living with dementia. This work provides important insights into the landscape of dementia in rural northern Ontario communities, and the strong social supports that sustain people with dementia remaining in the communities.
PubMed ID
24381217 View in PubMed
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Comparison of Summer and Winter Objectively Measured Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior in Older Adults: Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility Reykjavik Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290965
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2017 10 21; 14(10):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Date
10-21-2017
Author
Nanna Yr Arnardottir
Nina Dora Oskarsdottir
Robert J Brychta
Annemarie Koster
Dane R van Domelen
Paolo Caserotti
Gudny Eiriksdottir
Johanna E Sverrisdottir
Erlingur Johannsson
Lenore J Launer
Vilmundur Gudnason
Tamara B Harris
Kong Y Chen
Thorarinn Sveinsson
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Education, University of Akureyri, Nordurslod 2, 600 Akureyri, Iceland. nanna@unak.is.
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2017 10 21; 14(10):
Date
10-21-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Keywords
Accelerometry
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Exercise
Female
Humans
Iceland
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Male
Seasons
Sedentary lifestyle
Abstract
In Iceland, there is a large variation in daylight between summer and winter. The aim of the study was to identify how this large variation influences physical activity (PA) and sedentary behavior (SB). Free living PA was measured by a waist-worn accelerometer for one week during waking hours in 138 community-dwelling older adults (61.1% women, 80.3 ± 4.9 years) during summer and winter months. In general, SB occupied about 75% of the registered wear-time and was highly correlated with age (ß = 0.36). Although the differences were small, more time was spent during the summer in all PA categories, except for the moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA), and SB was reduced. More lifestyle PA (LSPA) was accumulated in =5-min bouts during summer than winter, especially among highly active participants. This information could be important for policy makers and health professionals working with older adults. Accounting for seasonal difference is necessary in analyzing SB and PA data.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29065475 View in PubMed
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Examining the relationship between communities' 'age-friendliness' and life satisfaction and self-perceived health in rural Manitoba, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256516
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2014;14:2594
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Verena H Menec
Scott Nowicki
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. verena.menec@med.umanitoba.ca.
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2014;14:2594
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Environment
Health status
Humans
Independent Living - psychology
Manitoba
Personal Satisfaction
Residence Characteristics
Rural Population
Social Environment
Socioeconomic Factors
Transportation
Abstract
Population aging is a worldwide phenomenon. As a response, the World Health Organization (WHO) introduced the concept of 'age-friendliness' in 2006. Age-friendliness is defined in terms of a range of domains, such as housing, opportunities for participation, and transportation. Communities that accommodate the needs of older adults in these domains will, it is thought, promote healthy, active aging. The purpose of the present study was to examine communities' age-friendliness and its relationship to health-related outcomes in a rural context.
The study included 29 communities located in Manitoba, a mid-Western Canadian province, that are part of the Province of Manitoba's Age-Friendly Manitoba Initiative. As part of a needs assessment process in these communities, 593 individuals, including seniors and younger adults, completed an Age-Friendly Survey. The survey was designed to measure a variety of features in seven domains (the physical environment, housing options, the social environment, opportunities for participation, community supports and healthcare services, transportation options, and communication and information), as well as containing measures of life satisfaction and self-perceived health. Community characteristics were derived from census data. Moreover, communities were categorized on a rural-urban continuum.
Multi-level regressions indicated that an overall Age-Friendly Index was positively related to both life satisfaction (b=0.019, p
PubMed ID
24437338 View in PubMed
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Inner strength and its relationship to health threats in ageing-A cross-sectional study among community-dwelling older women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292392
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2017 Nov; 73(11):2720-2729
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2017
Author
Erika Boman
Berit Lundman
Björn Nygren
Kristofer Årestedt
Regina Santamäki Fischer
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing, Åland University of Applied Sciences, Mariehamn, Finland.
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2017 Nov; 73(11):2720-2729
Date
Nov-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland
Humans
Independent living
Mental health
Middle Aged
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
To explore the relationship between inner strength and health threats among community-dwelling older women.
Inner strength is described as a resource that promotes experiences of health, despite adversities. Inner strength and its dimensions (i.e. connectedness, creativity, firmness and flexibility) can be assessed using the Inner Strength Scale (ISS). Exploring attributes of weaker inner strength may yield valuable information about areas to focus on in enhancing a person's inner strength and may ultimately lead to the perception of better health.
Cross-sectional questionnaire survey.
The study is based on responses from 1270 community-dwelling older women aged 65 years and older; these were collected in the year 2010 and describe the situation that still exists today for older women. The questionnaire included the ISS, background characteristics and explanatory variables known to be health threats in ageing. Data were analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics.
Poorer mental health was related to weaker inner strength in total and in all the dimensions. Symptoms of depressive disorders and feeling lonely were related to three of the dimensions, except firmness and creativity respectively. Furthermore, poor physical health was associated with the dimensions firmness and flexibility. Other health threats were significantly related to only one of the dimensions, or not associated at all.
Mental ill health has overall the strongest association with weaker inner strength. Longitudinal studies are recommended to confirm the results. However, the ISS does not only estimate inner strength but can also be a tool for discovering where (i.e. dimension) interventions may be most profitable.
PubMed ID
28513995 View in PubMed
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Neuropathic Pain Among Community-Dwelling Older People: A Clinical Study in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271986
Source
Drugs Aging. 2015 Sep;32(9):737-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2015
Author
Susanna Rapo-Pylkkö
Maija Haanpää
Helena Liira
Source
Drugs Aging. 2015 Sep;32(9):737-42
Date
Sep-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chronic Pain - drug therapy - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Independent living
Male
Neuralgia - drug therapy - epidemiology
Abstract
Neuropathic pain is more common among older people than in the general population, and the efficacy of medical treatment often remains unsatisfactory.
The aim of this study was to assess the presence, diagnostic certainty, etiology and treatment of neuropathic pain in community-dwelling older people with chronic pain.
Independently living older people aged 75, 80 and 85 years subject to communal preventive home visits with chronic pain were invited to a clinical pain examination by a geriatrician.
Overall, 106 patients consented to participate in the clinical study. Neuropathic pain was diagnosed in 51 (48%) patients, with 75% of pain states definite and 25% probable neuropathic pain. The most common etiology was degenerative disease of the spinal column causing radiculopathy. At the study visit, 11 patients (22% of neuropathic pain patients) were receiving medication that was demonstrated to be effective against neuropathic pain. The geriatrician recommended a trial of a new medicine for 17 patients, but only six continued the medication going forward.
Neuropathic pain was surprisingly common in our cohort. Finding effective pain medication is challenging due to comorbidities, possible side effects, and vulnerability in older age. Other pain management methods should be considered.
PubMed ID
26363908 View in PubMed
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Older women's personal goals and exercise activity: an 8-year follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103083
Source
J Aging Phys Act. 2014 Jul;22(3):386-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2014
Author
Milla Saajanaho
Anne Viljanen
Sanna Read
Merja Rantakokko
Li-Tang Tsai
Jaakko Kaprio
Marja Jylhä
Taina Rantanen
Author Affiliation
Gerontology Research Center, Dept. of Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
Source
J Aging Phys Act. 2014 Jul;22(3):386-92
Date
Jul-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Exercise
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Goals
Health Behavior
Humans
Independent living
Risk Reduction Behavior
Self Report
Abstract
This study investigated the associations of personal goals with exercise activity, as well as the relationships between exercise-related and other personal goals, among older women. Both cross-sectional and longitudinal designs were used with a sample of 308 women ages 66-79 at baseline. Women who reported exercise-related personal goals were 4 times as likely to report high exercise activity at baseline than those who did not report exercise-related goals. Longitudinal results were parallel. Goals related to cultural activities, as well as to busying oneself around the home, coincided with exercise-related goals, whereas goals related to own and other people's health and independent living lowered the odds of having exercise-related goals. Helping older adults to set realistic exercise-related goals that are compatible with their other life goals may yield an increase in their exercise activity, but this should be evaluated in a controlled trial.
PubMed ID
23945665 View in PubMed
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Sustained economic benefits of resistance training in community-dwelling senior women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133301
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2011 Jul;59(7):1232-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
Jennifer C Davis
Carlo A Marra
M Clare Robertson
Mehdi Najafzadeh
Teresa Liu-Ambrose
Author Affiliation
Centre for Clinical Epidemiology and Evaluation, Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. jcdavis@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2011 Jul;59(7):1232-7
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Cognition Disorders - economics - prevention & control
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Female
Humans
Independent living
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Resistance Training - economics
Abstract
To determine whether the health and cost benefits of resistance training were sustained 12 months after formal cessation of the intervention.
Cost-utility analysis conducted alongside a randomized controlled trial.
Community-dwelling women aged 65 to 75 living in Vancouver, British Columbia.
One hundred twenty-three of the 155 community-dwelling women aged 65 to 75 years who originally were randomly allocated to once-weekly resistance training (n=54), twice-weekly resistance training (n=52), or twice-weekly balance and tone exercises (control group; n=49) participated in the 12-month follow-up study. Of these, 98 took part in the economic evaluation (twice-weekly balance and tone exercises, n=28; once-weekly resistance training, n=35; twice-weekly resistance training, n=35).
The primary outcome measure was incremental cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained. Healthcare resource utilization was assessed over 21 months (2009 prices); health status was assessed using the EuroQol-5D to calculate QALYs using a 21-month time horizon.
Once- and twice-weekly resistance training were less costly than balance and tone classes, with incremental mean healthcare costs of Canadian dollars (CAD$)1,857 and CAD$1,077, respectively. The incremental QALYs for once- and twice-weekly resistance training were -0.051 and -0.081, respectively, compared with balance and tone exercises.
The cost benefits of participating in a 12-month resistance training intervention were sustained for the once- and twice-weekly resistance training group, whereas the health benefits were not.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21718265 View in PubMed
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170 records – page 1 of 17.