Skip header and navigation

Refine By

170 records – page 1 of 17.

Change in psychotropic drug use among community-dwelling people aged 75 years and older in Finland: repeated cross-sectional population studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134674
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2011 Oct;23(8):1278-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
Franciska Desplenter
Charlotte Caenen
Jolein Meelberghs
Sirpa Hartikainen
Raimo Sulkava
J Simon Bell
Author Affiliation
Kuopio Research Centre of Geriatric Care, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2011 Oct;23(8):1278-84
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Anxiety Agents - therapeutic use
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Chi-Square Distribution
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health status
Humans
Hypnotics and Sedatives - therapeutic use
Independent Living - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Logistic Models
Male
Odds Ratio
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Psychotropic Drugs - therapeutic use
Socioeconomic Factors
Statistics, nonparametric
Abstract
Older people are at high risk of experiencing psychotropic-related adverse drug events. The objective of this study was to compare and contrast the use of psychotropic drugs among community-dwelling people aged = 75 years in 1998 and 2004.
Comparable random samples of people aged = 75 years were extracted from the population register in Kuopio, Finland, in 1998 (n = 700) and 2003 (n = 1000). In 1998 and 2004, 523 and 700 community-dwelling people respectively participated in nurse interviews, during which demographic, diagnostic and drug use data were elicited. Logistic regression was used to compute unadjusted and adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the prevalence of psychotropic drug use in 2004 compared to 1998.
The unadjusted prevalence of total psychotropic (37.3% and 38.4%, OR 1.05; 95% CI 0.83-1.33), anxiolytic, hypnotic and sedative (29.6% and 31.3%, OR 1.08, 95% CI 0.85-1.38), and antidepressant (10.7% and 11.9%, OR 1.12, 95% CI 0.78-1.61) use were similar in 1998 and 2004. There was a decrease in the unadjusted prevalence of antipsychotic use (9.2% and 5.7%, OR 0.60; 95% CI 0.39-0.93). After adjusting for socioeconomic and health status differences, there was an increase in the prevalence of total psychotropic (adjusted OR 1.31, 95% CI 1.01-1.70) and antidepressant (OR 1.59, 95% CI 1.06-2.40) use.
The unadjusted prevalence of psychotropic drug use remained stable between 1998 and 2004. However, in adjusted analyses there was a small increase in the prevalence of any psychotropic drug use and antidepressant use specifically.
PubMed ID
21554797 View in PubMed
Less detail

Residential normalcy and environmental experiences of very old people: changes in residential reasoning over time.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104667
Source
J Aging Stud. 2014 Apr;29:9-19
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Marianne Granbom
Ines Himmelsbach
Maria Haak
Charlotte Löfqvist
Frank Oswald
Susanne Iwarsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Box 157, SE-221 00 Lund, Sweden. Electronic address: marianne.granbom@med.lu.se.
Source
J Aging Stud. 2014 Apr;29:9-19
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged, 80 and over - psychology
Attitude to Health
Environment Design
Female
Germany
Homeless Persons - psychology
Housing for the Elderly
Humans
Independent Living - psychology
Interviews as Topic
Loneliness - psychology
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Memory, Long-Term
Object Attachment
Patient Safety
Privacy - psychology
Skilled Nursing Facilities
Social Distance
Social Environment
Sweden
Abstract
The decision to relocate in old age is intricately linked to thoughts and desires to stay put. However, most research focuses either on strategies that allow people to age in place or on their reasons for relocation. There is a need for more knowledge on very old peoples' residential reasoning, including thoughts about aging in place and thoughts about relocation as one intertwined process evolving in everyday life. The aim of this study was to explore what we refer to as the process of residential reasoning and how it changes over time among very old people, and to contribute to the theoretical development regarding aging in place and relocation. Taking a longitudinal perspective, data stem from the ENABLE-AGE In-depth Study, with interviews conducted in 2003 followed up in interviews in 2011. The 16 participants of the present study were 80-89years at the time of the first interview. During analysis the Theoretical Model of Residential Normalcy by Golant and the Life Course Model of Environmental Experience by Rowles & Watkins were used as sensitizing concepts. The findings revealed changes in the process of residential reasoning that related to a wide variety of issues. Such issues included the way very old people use their environmental experience, their striving to build upon or dismiss attachment to place, and their attempts to maintain or regain residential normalcy during years of declining health and loss of independence. In addition, the changes in reasoning were related to end-of-life issues. The findings contribute to the theoretical discussion on aging in place, relocation as a coping strategy, and reattachment after moving in very old age.
PubMed ID
24655669 View in PubMed
Less detail

Validity of a single question to assess habitual physical activity of community-dwelling older people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290450
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2017 Nov; 27(11):1423-1430
Publication Type
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Date
Nov-2017
Author
E Portegijs
S Sipilä
A Viljanen
M Rantakokko
T Rantanen
Author Affiliation
Gerontology Research Center and Department of Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2017 Nov; 27(11):1423-1430
Date
Nov-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Exercise
Female
Finland
Humans
Independent living
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mobility Limitation
Self Report
Surveys and Questionnaires
Walking
Abstract
The aim is to determine concurrent validity of a single self-report habitual physical activity (PA) question against accelerometer-based PA and mobility variables, and corresponding changes in self-reported PA and mobility. Cross-sectional and longitudinal data of the "Life-space mobility in old age" (LISPE) cohort and its substudy on PA were utilized. At baseline, 848 community-dwelling, 75- to 90-year-old people living independently in central Finland participated in home-based interviews. One and 2 years later, 816 and 761 of them were reassessed by phone, respectively. Tri-axial accelerometer data over 7 days were collected following the baseline assessments in a subsample of 174. Self-reported habitual PA was assessed based on intensity and duration using a single question with seven response options (range: mostly resting to competitive sports). Mobility variables were as follows: life-space mobility, walking difficulty over 500 m, and short physical performance battery. Statistically significant correlations were found between self-reported habitual PA and mobility (Spearman correlation coefficient Rs = 0.40-0.61) and accelerometer-based PA variables [step counts (Rs = 0.49), time in moderate (Rs = 0.49) and low intensity (Rs = 0.40) PA, and time in sedentary behavior (Rs = -0.28)]. A decline in self-reported habitual PA over time was associated with 5-10p decline in life-space mobility (PA improvement with 0-3p increase) and with developing a higher degree of walking difficulty (in 35-44% of participants). In conclusion, based on these results, the self-report question to assess habitual PA is valid and responsive to change and thus useful for epidemiological research in community-dwelling older people, also in follow-up studies.
PubMed ID
27747944 View in PubMed
Less detail

Perceived environmental barriers to outdoor mobility and changes in sense of autonomy in participation outdoors among older people: a prospective two-year cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290462
Source
Aging Ment Health. 2017 Aug; 21(8):805-809
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Aug-2017
Author
Merja Rantakokko
Erja Portegijs
Anne Viljanen
Susanne Iwarsson
Markku Kauppinen
Taina Rantanen
Author Affiliation
a Gerontology Research Center and Department of Health Sciences , University of Jyväskylä , Jyväskylä , Finland.
Source
Aging Ment Health. 2017 Aug; 21(8):805-809
Date
Aug-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Community Participation - statistics & numerical data
Environment
Female
Finland
Humans
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Male
Mobility Limitation
Personal Autonomy
Abstract
The aim was to study whether perceived environmental barriers to outdoor mobility affect changes in sense of autonomy in participation outdoors among community-dwelling older people over a two-year period.
Community-dwelling people aged 75-90 years (n = 848) in central Finland were interviewed on two occasions, face-to-face at baseline and over the telephone two years later. Perceived environmental barriers to outdoor mobility were assessed using a 15-item structured questionnaire, and the sum scores categorized into tertiles (0, 1 and 2 or more barriers). Autonomy in participation outdoors was assessed with the 'Impact on Participation and Autonomy' (IPA) questionnaire using the autonomy outdoors subscale (score range 0-20, higher scores indicating more restricted autonomy).
Scores for autonomy in participation outdoors were available for 848 participants at baseline (mean 6.2, SD = 3.8) and for 748 participants at the two-year follow-up (mean 6.7, SD = 3.9). At baseline, those reporting multiple environmental barriers had the most restricted autonomy, while those reporting no environmental barriers had the least restricted autonomy (p
PubMed ID
26979293 View in PubMed
Less detail

Comparison of Summer and Winter Objectively Measured Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior in Older Adults: Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility Reykjavik Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290965
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2017 10 21; 14(10):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Date
10-21-2017
Author
Nanna Yr Arnardottir
Nina Dora Oskarsdottir
Robert J Brychta
Annemarie Koster
Dane R van Domelen
Paolo Caserotti
Gudny Eiriksdottir
Johanna E Sverrisdottir
Erlingur Johannsson
Lenore J Launer
Vilmundur Gudnason
Tamara B Harris
Kong Y Chen
Thorarinn Sveinsson
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Education, University of Akureyri, Nordurslod 2, 600 Akureyri, Iceland. nanna@unak.is.
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2017 10 21; 14(10):
Date
10-21-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Keywords
Accelerometry
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Exercise
Female
Humans
Iceland
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Male
Seasons
Sedentary lifestyle
Abstract
In Iceland, there is a large variation in daylight between summer and winter. The aim of the study was to identify how this large variation influences physical activity (PA) and sedentary behavior (SB). Free living PA was measured by a waist-worn accelerometer for one week during waking hours in 138 community-dwelling older adults (61.1% women, 80.3 ± 4.9 years) during summer and winter months. In general, SB occupied about 75% of the registered wear-time and was highly correlated with age (ß = 0.36). Although the differences were small, more time was spent during the summer in all PA categories, except for the moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA), and SB was reduced. More lifestyle PA (LSPA) was accumulated in =5-min bouts during summer than winter, especially among highly active participants. This information could be important for policy makers and health professionals working with older adults. Accounting for seasonal difference is necessary in analyzing SB and PA data.
Notes
Cites: BMC Med Res Methodol. 2009 Aug 10;9:58 PMID 19664254
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2001 Jan 15;153(2):172-83 PMID 11159163
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2014 Mar 27;14:284 PMID 24673834
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2007 May 1;165(9):1076-87 PMID 17351290
Cites: Ann Hum Biol. 2014 Jan-Feb;41(1):1-8 PMID 23992280
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2011 Apr;43(4):647-54 PMID 20689449
Cites: Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2009 Jun 29;6:36 PMID 19563650
Cites: Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2009 Apr;34(2):182-90 PMID 19370048
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2007 Aug;39(8):1423-34 PMID 17762377
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2008 Jan;40(1):181-8 PMID 18091006
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2010 Nov;64(11):1010-6 PMID 19843499
Cites: Ann Hum Biol. 2008 Mar-Apr;35(2):154-69 PMID 18428010
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Nov;88(5):1225-31 PMID 18996856
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2007 Aug;39(8):1435-45 PMID 17762378
Cites: J Aging Phys Act. 2009 Jan;17(1):17-30 PMID 19299836
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2013 Aug;45(8):1493-500 PMID 23475142
Cites: J Intern Med. 2007 Sep;262(3):273-87 PMID 17697152
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 1993 Jun;25(6):755-60 PMID 8321115
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2005 Nov;37(11 Suppl):S512-22 PMID 16294114
Cites: Public Health. 2007 Dec;121(12):909-22 PMID 17920646
Cites: Prev Chronic Dis. 2008 Oct;5(4):A131 PMID 18793519
Cites: J Phys Act Health. 2009 Mar;6(2):252-61 PMID 19420404
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2004 Aug;36(8):1364-71 PMID 15292745
Cites: Int J Biometeorol. 2005 Nov;50(2):83-9 PMID 16044348
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2016 Mar;48(3):430-8 PMID 26460633
Cites: J Phys Act Health. 2011 Jan;8(1):36-44 PMID 21297183
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2010 Nov 15;172(10):1155-65 PMID 20843864
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2009 Apr;63(4):305-9 PMID 19074181
Cites: Diabetes. 2007 Nov;56(11):2655-67 PMID 17827399
Cites: J Aging Phys Act. 2008 Jan;16(1):3-13 PMID 18212390
Cites: Eur Urol. 2007 Sep;52(3):708-14 PMID 17174467
Cites: Age Ageing. 2013 Mar;42(2):222-9 PMID 23117467
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2012 May;66(5):474-6 PMID 21325149
Cites: Obes Res. 2004 Apr;12(4):688-94 PMID 15090638
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2005 Nov;37(11 Suppl):S490-500 PMID 16294112
Cites: Sports Med. 2001 Feb;31(2):91-100 PMID 11227981
Cites: Sports Med. 2009;39(1):29-43 PMID 19093694
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2006 Feb;38(2):367-72 PMID 16531908
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2010 May 15;171(10):1055-64 PMID 20406758
Cites: Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2006 Aug 07;3:21 PMID 16893452
Cites: Health Place. 2007 Sep;13(3):588-602 PMID 16935020
Cites: J Aging Phys Act. 2014 Apr;22(2):226-34 PMID 23752449
Cites: Ann Behav Med. 2004 Dec;28(3):158-62 PMID 15576253
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1989 Jan;129(1):76-88 PMID 2910074
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 1992 Sep;40(9):922-35 PMID 1512391
PubMed ID
29065475 View in PubMed
Less detail

Living Alone with Alzheimer's Disease: Data from SveDem, the Swedish Dementia Registry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292004
Source
J Alzheimers Dis. 2017; 58(4):1265-1272
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2017
Author
Pavla Cermakova
Maja Nelson
Juraj Secnik
Sara Garcia-Ptacek
Kristina Johnell
Johan Fastbom
Lena Kilander
Bengt Winblad
Maria Eriksdotter
Dorota Religa
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences andSociety, Division of Neurogeriatrics, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
J Alzheimers Dis. 2017; 58(4):1265-1272
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - drug therapy - epidemiology - psychology
Antidepressive Agents
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Dementia - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Independent living
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Registries
Social Conditions
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Many people with Alzheimer's disease (AD) live alone in their own homes. There is a lack of knowledge about whether these individuals receive the same quality of diagnostics and treatment for AD as patients who are cohabiting.
To investigate the diagnostic work-up and treatment of community-dwelling AD patients who live alone.
We performed a cross-sectional cohort study based on data from the Swedish Dementia Registry (SveDem). We studied patients diagnosed with AD between 2007 and 2015 (n?=?26,163). Information about drugs and comorbidities was acquired from the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register and the Swedish Patient Register.
11,878 (46%) patients lived alone, primarily older women. After adjusting for confounders, living alone was inversely associated with receiving computed tomography (OR 0.90; 95% CI 0.82-0.99), magnetic resonance imaging (OR 0.91; 95% CI 0.83-0.99), and lumbar puncture (OR 0.86; 95% CI 0.80-0.92). Living alone was also negatively associated with the use of cholinesterase inhibitors (OR 0.81; 95% CI 0.76; 0.87), memantine (OR 0.77; 95% CI 0.72; 0.83), and cardiovascular medication (OR 0.92; 0.86; 0.99). On the other hand, living alone was positively associated with the use of antidepressants (OR 1.15; 95% CI 1.08; 1.22), antipsychotics (OR 1.41; 95% CI 1.25; 1.58), and hypnotics and sedatives (OR 1.09; 95% CI 1.02; 1.17).
Solitary living AD patients do not receive the same extent of care as those who are cohabiting.
Notes
Cites: Aging Ment Health. 2017 Oct;21(10 ):1065-1071 PMID 27267633
Cites: J Am Med Dir Assoc. 2017 Jan;18(1):19-23 PMID 27639334
Cites: Popul Trends. 2004 Spring;(115):24-34 PMID 15192891
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2011 Jun 09;11:450 PMID 21658213
Cites: PLoS One. 2015 Feb 19;10(2):e0116538 PMID 25695768
Cites: Curr Opin Psychiatry. 2011 Nov;24(6):461-72 PMID 21926624
Cites: Scand J Caring Sci. 2014 Dec;28(4):842-51 PMID 25562100
Cites: Eur J Heart Fail. 2015 Jun;17(6):612-9 PMID 25581033
Cites: J Nutr Health Aging. 2005;9(2):117-20 PMID 15791356
Cites: BMJ. 2009 Jul 02;339:b2462 PMID 19574312
Cites: Nat Sci Sleep. 2016 Jan 14;8:21-33 PMID 26834500
Cites: Alzheimer Dis Assoc Disord. 2011 Jul-Sep;25(3):269-75 PMID 21285857
Cites: BMJ. 2008 Aug 28;337:a1227 PMID 18755769
Cites: Clin Interv Aging. 2014 Nov 14;9:1951-62 PMID 25484578
Cites: J Chronic Dis. 1987;40(5):373-83 PMID 3558716
Cites: J Alzheimers Dis. 2016;52(2):619-29 PMID 27031480
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2013 Aug;41(6):637-43 PMID 23567645
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2015 Apr;63(4):651-8 PMID 25900483
Cites: J Alzheimers Dis. 2015;48(4):949-58 PMID 26402118
Cites: Med Care. 2005 Nov;43(11):1130-9 PMID 16224307
Cites: Lancet. 2000 Apr 15;355(9212):1315-9 PMID 10776744
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 1991 Mar;91(3):300-4 PMID 1997551
Cites: Int J Psychiatry Med. 2012;43(1):19-34 PMID 22641928
Cites: Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2007 Jul;16(7):726-35 PMID 16897791
Cites: Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 1998 Jul;13(7):484-92 PMID 9695039
Cites: J Alzheimers Dis. 2015;48(1):229-39 PMID 26401943
Cites: Alzheimers Res Ther. 2014 Jun 16;6(3):34 PMID 25024749
Cites: Alzheimer Dis Assoc Disord. 2013 Apr-Jun;27(2):123-32 PMID 22546783
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2001 Nov 1;154(9):854-64 PMID 11682368
Cites: Can J Psychiatry. 2014 Dec;59(12):624-31 PMID 25702361
Cites: Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord. 2012;33(2-3):104-10 PMID 22472600
Cites: Gerontologist. 1994 Feb;34(1):8-14 PMID 8150314
Cites: Eur J Public Health. 2016 Feb;26(1):182-7 PMID 25817209
Cites: Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord. 2012;33(2-3):90-5 PMID 22433665
Cites: Lancet Neurol. 2016 Apr;15(5):455-532 PMID 26987701
Cites: Lancet Neurol. 2013 Feb;12(2):207-16 PMID 23332364
PubMed ID
28550260 View in PubMed
Less detail

Inner strength and its relationship to health threats in ageing-A cross-sectional study among community-dwelling older women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292392
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2017 Nov; 73(11):2720-2729
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2017
Author
Erika Boman
Berit Lundman
Björn Nygren
Kristofer Årestedt
Regina Santamäki Fischer
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing, Åland University of Applied Sciences, Mariehamn, Finland.
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2017 Nov; 73(11):2720-2729
Date
Nov-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland
Humans
Independent living
Mental health
Middle Aged
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
To explore the relationship between inner strength and health threats among community-dwelling older women.
Inner strength is described as a resource that promotes experiences of health, despite adversities. Inner strength and its dimensions (i.e. connectedness, creativity, firmness and flexibility) can be assessed using the Inner Strength Scale (ISS). Exploring attributes of weaker inner strength may yield valuable information about areas to focus on in enhancing a person's inner strength and may ultimately lead to the perception of better health.
Cross-sectional questionnaire survey.
The study is based on responses from 1270 community-dwelling older women aged 65 years and older; these were collected in the year 2010 and describe the situation that still exists today for older women. The questionnaire included the ISS, background characteristics and explanatory variables known to be health threats in ageing. Data were analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics.
Poorer mental health was related to weaker inner strength in total and in all the dimensions. Symptoms of depressive disorders and feeling lonely were related to three of the dimensions, except firmness and creativity respectively. Furthermore, poor physical health was associated with the dimensions firmness and flexibility. Other health threats were significantly related to only one of the dimensions, or not associated at all.
Mental ill health has overall the strongest association with weaker inner strength. Longitudinal studies are recommended to confirm the results. However, the ISS does not only estimate inner strength but can also be a tool for discovering where (i.e. dimension) interventions may be most profitable.
PubMed ID
28513995 View in PubMed
Less detail

Anticholinergic drug use and its association with self-reported symptoms among older persons with and without diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298928
Source
J Clin Pharm Ther. 2019 Apr; 44(2):229-235
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2019
Author
Niina-Mari Inkeri
Merja Karjalainen
Maija Haanpää
Hannu Kautiainen
Juha Saltevo
Pekka Mäntyselkä
Miia Tiihonen
Author Affiliation
School of Pharmacy, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
J Clin Pharm Ther. 2019 Apr; 44(2):229-235
Date
Apr-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cholinergic Antagonists - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Female
Finland
Humans
Independent living
Male
Practice Patterns, Physicians' - statistics & numerical data
Primary Health Care
Self Report
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Anticholinergic drug use has been associated with a risk of central and peripheral adverse effects. There is a lack of information on anticholinergic drug use in persons with diabetes. The aim of this study is to investigate anticholinergic drug use and the association between anticholinergic drug use and self-reported symptoms in older community-dwelling persons with and without diabetes.
The basic population was comprised of Finnish community-dwelling primary care patients aged 65 and older. Persons with diabetes were identified according to the ICD-10 diagnostic codes from electronic patient records. Two controls adjusted by age and gender were selected for each person with diabetes. This cross-sectional study was based on electronic primary care patient records and a structured health questionnaire. The health questionnaire was returned by 430 (81.6%) persons with diabetes and 654 (73.5%) persons without diabetes. Data on prescribed drugs were obtained from the electronic patient records. Anticholinergic drug use was measured according to the Anticholinergic Risk Scale. The presence and strength of anticholinergic symptoms were asked in the health questionnaire.
The prevalence of anticholinergic drug use was 8.9% in the total study cohort. There were no significant differences in anticholinergic drug use between persons with and without diabetes. There was no consistent association between anticholinergic drug use and self-reported symptoms.
There is no difference in anticholinergic drug use in older community-dwelling persons with and without diabetes. Anticholinergic drug use should be considered individually and monitored carefully.
PubMed ID
30315583 View in PubMed
Less detail

The influence of participation on mortality in very old age among community-living people in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299016
Source
Aging Clin Exp Res. 2019 Feb; 31(2):265-271
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-2019
Author
Maria Haak
Charlotte Löfqvist
Susann Ullén
Vibeke Horstmann
Susanne Iwarsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Box 157, 221 00, Lund, Sweden. maria.haak@med.lu.se.
Source
Aging Clin Exp Res. 2019 Feb; 31(2):265-271
Date
Feb-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Health promotion
Humans
Independent living
Leisure Activities
Longevity
Male
Proportional Hazards Models
Sweden
Abstract
Participation in everyday life and society is generally seen as essential for health-related outcomes and acknowledged to affect older people's well-being.
To investigate if aspects of performance- and togetherness-related participation influence on mortality among very old single living people in Sweden.
ENABLE-AGE Survey Study data involving single-living participants in Sweden (N?=?314, aged 81-91 years), followed over 10 years were used. Multivariate Cox regression models adjusted for demographic and health-related variables were used to analyse specific items influencing mortality.
Participation in performance- or togetherness-oriented activities was found to significantly influence mortality [HR 0.62 (0.44-0.88), P value 0.006, and HR 0.72 (0.53-0.97), P value 0.031, respectively]. Talking to neighbours and following local politics had a protective effect on mortality, speaking to relatives on the phone (CI 1.10-2.02) and performing leisure activities together with others (CI 1.10-2.00) had the opposite influence. That is, those performing the latter activities were significantly more likely to die earlier.
The main contribution of this study is the facet of the results showing that aspects of performance- and togetherness-related participation have a protective effect on mortality in very old age. This is important knowledge for designing health promotion and preventive efforts for the ageing population. Moreover, it constitutes a contribution to the development of instruments capturing aspects of participation influencing on mortality.
In the development of health promotion and preventive efforts the inclusion of participation facets could be considered in favour of potential positive influences on longevity.
PubMed ID
29679295 View in PubMed
Less detail

170 records – page 1 of 17.