Skip header and navigation

Refine By

170 records – page 1 of 17.

Dependency and transfer incomes in idiopathic Parkinson's disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263808
Source
Dan Med J. 2014 Oct;61(10):A4915
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
Charlotte Starhof
Niels Anker
Tove Henriksen
Christina Funch Lassen
Source
Dan Med J. 2014 Oct;61(10):A4915
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Denmark - epidemiology
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Income - statistics & numerical data
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Homes - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Parkinson Disease - economics - epidemiology
Registries
Young Adult
Abstract
Idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder affecting approximately 1% of the population above 65 years of age. The aim of this study was to define the estimated Danish IPD population and to elucidate source of income and labour market affiliation for working-age IPD patients.
IPD cases were included through the Danish Register of Medicinal Product Statistics. The participants had to be alive by the end of 2010 and at least twice have cashed in prescriptions on IPD medication in the 2009-2010 period. Information on employment status and transfer income was retrieved through the DREAM database under the Danish Ministry of Employment.
A total of 7,033 estimated IPD patients were identified. The mean age at time of registration (2010, week 50) was 72 years. Overall, 7% of the IPD patients were employed and 5% were self-supportive. In the working age range (18-64 years), 25% were employed and 10% enrolled in supported employment. Compared with the age-adjusted general population, twice as many IPD patients were outside the ordinary labour market and, furthermore, the proportion receiving anticipatory pension was increased threefold. The majority (89%) of the patients were living at home with a spouse (59%). 11% were nursing home residents.
The working age IPD population was more prone to be outside employment and to receive public transfer income than an age-adjusted population sample.
The study was funded by the Danish Parkinson Association.
not relevant.
PubMed ID
25283617 View in PubMed
Less detail

Collective action for a common service platform for independent living services.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263914
Source
Int J Med Inform. 2013 Oct;82(10):922-39
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Fatemeh Nikayin
Mark De Reuver
Timo Itälä
Source
Int J Med Inform. 2013 Oct;82(10):922-39
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cooperative Behavior
Delivery of Health Care - organization & administration
Finland
Home Care Services - organization & administration
Independent living
Interinstitutional Relations
Leadership
Models, organizational
Organizational Objectives
Abstract
The paper aims to explain how and why organizations, providing assistive devices and related web services for elderly independent living services, might be willing to collaborate and to share their resources and data on a common service platform.
A theoretical framework from literature on collective action theory, platform and business ecosystem concepts was developed to explain what factors influence inter-organizational collective action for a common service platform. The framework was tested in a case study of collaborative platform project for independent living services in Finland. Semi-structured interviews with the project managers and the decision makers of involved organizations were the primary source of data collection.
Strikingly, interdependency among the organizations was not found to be important for collaboration in this case. Instead, we found that a central organization can play an important role in initiating, facilitating and encouraging collaboration among different parties. Moreover, we found more willingness for collaboration when the platform is aimed to be open to third-parties to complement the platform with additional services.
Strategies of the platform leader and openness of the platform towards third parties are the most important drivers for collective action between organizations offering independent living services. Establishing common service platforms for independent living services requires explicit attention to these inter-organizational issues.
PubMed ID
23891564 View in PubMed
Less detail

Community-dwelling older people with an injurious fall are likely to sustain new injurious falls within 5 years--a prospective long-term follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264015
Source
BMC Geriatr. 2014;14:120
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Petra Pohl
Ellinor Nordin
Anders Lundquist
Ulrica Bergström
Lillemor Lundin-Olsson
Source
BMC Geriatr. 2014;14:120
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Incidence
Independent living
Male
Motor Activity - physiology
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
Fall-related injuries in older people are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Self-reported fall events in the last year is often used to estimate fall risk in older people. However, it remains to be investigated if the fall frequency and the consequences of the falls have an impact on the risk for subsequent injurious falls in the long term. The objective of this study was to investigate if a history of one single non-injurious fall, at least two non-injurious falls, or at least one injurious fall within 12 months increases the risk of sustaining future injurious falls.
Community-dwelling individuals 75-93 years of age (n = 230) were initially followed prospectively with monthly calendars reporting falls over a period of 12 months. The participants were classified into four groups based on the number and type of falls (0, 1, =2 non-injurious falls, and =1 injurious fall severe enough to cause a visit to a hospital emergency department). The participants were then followed for several years (mean time 5.0 years ±1.1) regarding injurious falls requiring a visit to the emergency department. The Andersen-Gill method of Cox regression for multiple events was used to estimate the risk of injurious falls.
During the long-term follow-up period, thirty per cent of the participants suffered from at least one injurious fall. Those with a self-reported history of at least one injurious fall during the initial 12 months follow-up period showed a significantly higher risk for sustaining subsequent injurious falls in the long term (hazard ratio 2.78; 95% CI, 1.40-5.50) compared to those with no falls. No other group showed an increased risk.
In community-dwelling people over 75 years of age, a history of at least one self-reported injurious fall severe enough to cause a visit to the emergency department within a period of 12 months implies an increased risk of sustaining future injurious falls. Our results support the recommendations to offer a multifactorial fall-risk assessment coupled with adequate interventions to community-dwelling people over 75 years who present to the ED due to an injurious fall.
Notes
Cites: Med Clin North Am. 2006 Sep;90(5):807-2416962843
Cites: JAMA. 2007 Jan 3;297(1):77-8617200478
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2008 Sep;19(9):1267-7318214568
Cites: Acad Emerg Med. 2009 Mar;16(3):211-919281493
Cites: Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2009 Nov-Dec;49(3):390-619144414
Cites: Gait Posture. 2010 Mar;31(3):317-2120047833
Cites: Gait Posture. 2010 May;32(1):92-720399100
Cites: Epidemiology. 2010 Sep;21(5):658-6820585256
Cites: JAMA. 2011 Jan 5;305(1):50-821205966
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2011 Jan;59(1):148-5721226685
Cites: Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2012 May-Jun;54(3):421-821862143
Cites: Calcif Tissue Int. 2011 Sep;89(3):203-1021667164
Cites: Scand J Caring Sci. 2011 Mar;25(1):185-9320626698
Cites: Age Ageing. 2012 May;41(3):358-6522156559
Cites: Emerg Med J. 2012 Sep;29(9):742-721965178
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2012;9:CD00714622972103
Cites: Maturitas. 2013 May;75(1):51-6123523272
Cites: Clin Interv Aging. 2013;8:765-7423836966
Cites: BMC Med Res Methodol. 2013;13:9223855337
Cites: BMC Health Serv Res. 2013;13:28623890164
Cites: Prev Med. 2013 Nov;57(5):511-723872174
Cites: BMC Geriatr. 2014;14:1524495705
Cites: Prehosp Emerg Care. 2014 Jul-Sep;18(3):342-924460481
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2000 Oct 9;160(18):2788-9511025789
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2003 Jan 2;348(1):42-912510042
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2003 Oct;51(10):1356-6414511154
Cites: BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2004 May 17;5:1315147583
Cites: J Psychiatr Res. 1975 Nov;12(3):189-981202204
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1988 Dec 29;319(26):1701-73205267
Cites: JAMA. 1989 May 12;261(18):2663-82709546
Cites: J Gerontol. 1991 Sep;46(5):M164-701890282
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1993 Feb 1;137(3):342-548452142
Cites: J Gerontol. 1994 Mar;49(2):M85-948126356
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 1994 Oct;42(10):1110-77930338
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 1995 Nov;43(11):1214-217594154
Cites: Age Ageing. 1996 Jan;25(1):29-388670526
Cites: Public Health. 1996 Mar;110(2):115-88901255
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1997 Oct 30;337(18):1279-849345078
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 1999 Jan;52(1):27-379973071
Cites: Md State Med J. 1965 Feb;14:61-514258950
Cites: Inj Prev. 2005 Apr;11(2):115-915805442
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2005 Sep;53(9):1618-2216137297
Cites: Age Ageing. 2006 Jan;35(1):5-1016364930
PubMed ID
25407714 View in PubMed
Less detail

More attention to pain management in community-dwelling older persons with chronic musculoskeletal pain.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264106
Source
Age Ageing. 2014 Nov;43(6):845-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
Niina Maria Karttunen
Juha Turunen
Riitta Ahonen
Sirpa Hartikainen
Source
Age Ageing. 2014 Nov;43(6):845-50
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analgesics - therapeutic use
Attitude of Health Personnel
Chi-Square Distribution
Chronic Pain - diagnosis - physiopathology - therapy
Female
Finland
Geriatric Assessment
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Independent living
Logistic Models
Male
Musculoskeletal Pain - diagnosis - physiopathology - psychology - therapy
Odds Ratio
Pain Management - methods
Pain Measurement
Patient satisfaction
Patients - psychology
Physician's Role
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
persistent pain is a major problem in older people, but little is known about older persons' opinion about the treatment of persistent pain.
the objective of this study was to investigate the factors associated with older participants having chronic musculoskeletal pain and hoping persistently that physician would pay more attention to the pain management.
this 3-year follow-up study was a part of large population-based Geriatric Multidisciplinary Strategy for the Good Care of the Elderly (GeMS) study. The population sample (n = 1000) of the GeMS study was randomly selected from older inhabitants (=75 years) of Kuopio city, Finland, and participants were interviewed annually in the municipal health centre or in the participant's current residence by three study nurses. The current substudy included participants with chronic musculoskeletal pain (n = 270). Participants were asked specifically whether they hoped that more attention would be paid to pain management by the physician.
at baseline, 41% of the community-dwelling older participants with chronic musculoskeletal pain hoped the physician would pay more attention to pain management. Of those participants, 49% were still continuing to hope after 1 year and 31% after 2 years. A persistent hope to receive more attention to pain management was associated with poor self-rated health (OR: 2.94; 95% CI: 1.04-8.30), moderate-to-severe pain (OR: 3.46; 95% CI: 1.42-8.44), and the daily use of analgesics (OR: 4.16; 95% CI: 1.08-16.09).
physicians need to take a more active role in the process of recognising, assessing and controlling persistent pain in older people.
PubMed ID
24814961 View in PubMed
Less detail

Validity of a single question to assess habitual physical activity of community-dwelling older people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290450
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2017 Nov; 27(11):1423-1430
Publication Type
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Date
Nov-2017
Author
E Portegijs
S Sipilä
A Viljanen
M Rantakokko
T Rantanen
Author Affiliation
Gerontology Research Center and Department of Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2017 Nov; 27(11):1423-1430
Date
Nov-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Exercise
Female
Finland
Humans
Independent living
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mobility Limitation
Self Report
Surveys and Questionnaires
Walking
Abstract
The aim is to determine concurrent validity of a single self-report habitual physical activity (PA) question against accelerometer-based PA and mobility variables, and corresponding changes in self-reported PA and mobility. Cross-sectional and longitudinal data of the "Life-space mobility in old age" (LISPE) cohort and its substudy on PA were utilized. At baseline, 848 community-dwelling, 75- to 90-year-old people living independently in central Finland participated in home-based interviews. One and 2 years later, 816 and 761 of them were reassessed by phone, respectively. Tri-axial accelerometer data over 7 days were collected following the baseline assessments in a subsample of 174. Self-reported habitual PA was assessed based on intensity and duration using a single question with seven response options (range: mostly resting to competitive sports). Mobility variables were as follows: life-space mobility, walking difficulty over 500 m, and short physical performance battery. Statistically significant correlations were found between self-reported habitual PA and mobility (Spearman correlation coefficient Rs = 0.40-0.61) and accelerometer-based PA variables [step counts (Rs = 0.49), time in moderate (Rs = 0.49) and low intensity (Rs = 0.40) PA, and time in sedentary behavior (Rs = -0.28)]. A decline in self-reported habitual PA over time was associated with 5-10p decline in life-space mobility (PA improvement with 0-3p increase) and with developing a higher degree of walking difficulty (in 35-44% of participants). In conclusion, based on these results, the self-report question to assess habitual PA is valid and responsive to change and thus useful for epidemiological research in community-dwelling older people, also in follow-up studies.
PubMed ID
27747944 View in PubMed
Less detail

Perceived environmental barriers to outdoor mobility and changes in sense of autonomy in participation outdoors among older people: a prospective two-year cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290462
Source
Aging Ment Health. 2017 Aug; 21(8):805-809
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Aug-2017
Author
Merja Rantakokko
Erja Portegijs
Anne Viljanen
Susanne Iwarsson
Markku Kauppinen
Taina Rantanen
Author Affiliation
a Gerontology Research Center and Department of Health Sciences , University of Jyväskylä , Jyväskylä , Finland.
Source
Aging Ment Health. 2017 Aug; 21(8):805-809
Date
Aug-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Community Participation - statistics & numerical data
Environment
Female
Finland
Humans
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Male
Mobility Limitation
Personal Autonomy
Abstract
The aim was to study whether perceived environmental barriers to outdoor mobility affect changes in sense of autonomy in participation outdoors among community-dwelling older people over a two-year period.
Community-dwelling people aged 75-90 years (n = 848) in central Finland were interviewed on two occasions, face-to-face at baseline and over the telephone two years later. Perceived environmental barriers to outdoor mobility were assessed using a 15-item structured questionnaire, and the sum scores categorized into tertiles (0, 1 and 2 or more barriers). Autonomy in participation outdoors was assessed with the 'Impact on Participation and Autonomy' (IPA) questionnaire using the autonomy outdoors subscale (score range 0-20, higher scores indicating more restricted autonomy).
Scores for autonomy in participation outdoors were available for 848 participants at baseline (mean 6.2, SD = 3.8) and for 748 participants at the two-year follow-up (mean 6.7, SD = 3.9). At baseline, those reporting multiple environmental barriers had the most restricted autonomy, while those reporting no environmental barriers had the least restricted autonomy (p
PubMed ID
26979293 View in PubMed
Less detail

Comparison of Summer and Winter Objectively Measured Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior in Older Adults: Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility Reykjavik Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290965
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2017 10 21; 14(10):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Date
10-21-2017
Author
Nanna Yr Arnardottir
Nina Dora Oskarsdottir
Robert J Brychta
Annemarie Koster
Dane R van Domelen
Paolo Caserotti
Gudny Eiriksdottir
Johanna E Sverrisdottir
Erlingur Johannsson
Lenore J Launer
Vilmundur Gudnason
Tamara B Harris
Kong Y Chen
Thorarinn Sveinsson
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Education, University of Akureyri, Nordurslod 2, 600 Akureyri, Iceland. nanna@unak.is.
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2017 10 21; 14(10):
Date
10-21-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Keywords
Accelerometry
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Exercise
Female
Humans
Iceland
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Male
Seasons
Sedentary lifestyle
Abstract
In Iceland, there is a large variation in daylight between summer and winter. The aim of the study was to identify how this large variation influences physical activity (PA) and sedentary behavior (SB). Free living PA was measured by a waist-worn accelerometer for one week during waking hours in 138 community-dwelling older adults (61.1% women, 80.3 ± 4.9 years) during summer and winter months. In general, SB occupied about 75% of the registered wear-time and was highly correlated with age (ß = 0.36). Although the differences were small, more time was spent during the summer in all PA categories, except for the moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA), and SB was reduced. More lifestyle PA (LSPA) was accumulated in =5-min bouts during summer than winter, especially among highly active participants. This information could be important for policy makers and health professionals working with older adults. Accounting for seasonal difference is necessary in analyzing SB and PA data.
Notes
Cites: BMC Med Res Methodol. 2009 Aug 10;9:58 PMID 19664254
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2001 Jan 15;153(2):172-83 PMID 11159163
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2014 Mar 27;14:284 PMID 24673834
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2007 May 1;165(9):1076-87 PMID 17351290
Cites: Ann Hum Biol. 2014 Jan-Feb;41(1):1-8 PMID 23992280
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2011 Apr;43(4):647-54 PMID 20689449
Cites: Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2009 Jun 29;6:36 PMID 19563650
Cites: Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2009 Apr;34(2):182-90 PMID 19370048
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2007 Aug;39(8):1423-34 PMID 17762377
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2008 Jan;40(1):181-8 PMID 18091006
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2010 Nov;64(11):1010-6 PMID 19843499
Cites: Ann Hum Biol. 2008 Mar-Apr;35(2):154-69 PMID 18428010
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Nov;88(5):1225-31 PMID 18996856
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2007 Aug;39(8):1435-45 PMID 17762378
Cites: J Aging Phys Act. 2009 Jan;17(1):17-30 PMID 19299836
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2013 Aug;45(8):1493-500 PMID 23475142
Cites: J Intern Med. 2007 Sep;262(3):273-87 PMID 17697152
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 1993 Jun;25(6):755-60 PMID 8321115
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2005 Nov;37(11 Suppl):S512-22 PMID 16294114
Cites: Public Health. 2007 Dec;121(12):909-22 PMID 17920646
Cites: Prev Chronic Dis. 2008 Oct;5(4):A131 PMID 18793519
Cites: J Phys Act Health. 2009 Mar;6(2):252-61 PMID 19420404
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2004 Aug;36(8):1364-71 PMID 15292745
Cites: Int J Biometeorol. 2005 Nov;50(2):83-9 PMID 16044348
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2016 Mar;48(3):430-8 PMID 26460633
Cites: J Phys Act Health. 2011 Jan;8(1):36-44 PMID 21297183
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2010 Nov 15;172(10):1155-65 PMID 20843864
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2009 Apr;63(4):305-9 PMID 19074181
Cites: Diabetes. 2007 Nov;56(11):2655-67 PMID 17827399
Cites: J Aging Phys Act. 2008 Jan;16(1):3-13 PMID 18212390
Cites: Eur Urol. 2007 Sep;52(3):708-14 PMID 17174467
Cites: Age Ageing. 2013 Mar;42(2):222-9 PMID 23117467
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2012 May;66(5):474-6 PMID 21325149
Cites: Obes Res. 2004 Apr;12(4):688-94 PMID 15090638
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2005 Nov;37(11 Suppl):S490-500 PMID 16294112
Cites: Sports Med. 2001 Feb;31(2):91-100 PMID 11227981
Cites: Sports Med. 2009;39(1):29-43 PMID 19093694
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2006 Feb;38(2):367-72 PMID 16531908
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2010 May 15;171(10):1055-64 PMID 20406758
Cites: Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2006 Aug 07;3:21 PMID 16893452
Cites: Health Place. 2007 Sep;13(3):588-602 PMID 16935020
Cites: J Aging Phys Act. 2014 Apr;22(2):226-34 PMID 23752449
Cites: Ann Behav Med. 2004 Dec;28(3):158-62 PMID 15576253
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1989 Jan;129(1):76-88 PMID 2910074
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 1992 Sep;40(9):922-35 PMID 1512391
PubMed ID
29065475 View in PubMed
Less detail

Change in psychotropic drug use among community-dwelling people aged 75 years and older in Finland: repeated cross-sectional population studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134674
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2011 Oct;23(8):1278-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
Franciska Desplenter
Charlotte Caenen
Jolein Meelberghs
Sirpa Hartikainen
Raimo Sulkava
J Simon Bell
Author Affiliation
Kuopio Research Centre of Geriatric Care, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2011 Oct;23(8):1278-84
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Anxiety Agents - therapeutic use
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Chi-Square Distribution
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health status
Humans
Hypnotics and Sedatives - therapeutic use
Independent Living - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Logistic Models
Male
Odds Ratio
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Psychotropic Drugs - therapeutic use
Socioeconomic Factors
Statistics, nonparametric
Abstract
Older people are at high risk of experiencing psychotropic-related adverse drug events. The objective of this study was to compare and contrast the use of psychotropic drugs among community-dwelling people aged = 75 years in 1998 and 2004.
Comparable random samples of people aged = 75 years were extracted from the population register in Kuopio, Finland, in 1998 (n = 700) and 2003 (n = 1000). In 1998 and 2004, 523 and 700 community-dwelling people respectively participated in nurse interviews, during which demographic, diagnostic and drug use data were elicited. Logistic regression was used to compute unadjusted and adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the prevalence of psychotropic drug use in 2004 compared to 1998.
The unadjusted prevalence of total psychotropic (37.3% and 38.4%, OR 1.05; 95% CI 0.83-1.33), anxiolytic, hypnotic and sedative (29.6% and 31.3%, OR 1.08, 95% CI 0.85-1.38), and antidepressant (10.7% and 11.9%, OR 1.12, 95% CI 0.78-1.61) use were similar in 1998 and 2004. There was a decrease in the unadjusted prevalence of antipsychotic use (9.2% and 5.7%, OR 0.60; 95% CI 0.39-0.93). After adjusting for socioeconomic and health status differences, there was an increase in the prevalence of total psychotropic (adjusted OR 1.31, 95% CI 1.01-1.70) and antidepressant (OR 1.59, 95% CI 1.06-2.40) use.
The unadjusted prevalence of psychotropic drug use remained stable between 1998 and 2004. However, in adjusted analyses there was a small increase in the prevalence of any psychotropic drug use and antidepressant use specifically.
PubMed ID
21554797 View in PubMed
Less detail

Frequent pain in older people with and without diabetes - Finnish community based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294408
Source
BMC Geriatr. 2018 03 15; 18(1):73
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
03-15-2018
Author
M Karjalainen
J Saltevo
M Tiihonen
M Haanpää
H Kautiainen
P Mäntyselkä
Author Affiliation
Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, General Practice, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
BMC Geriatr. 2018 03 15; 18(1):73
Date
03-15-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Diabetes Mellitus - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Independent Living - psychology
Male
Pain - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Pain Measurement - methods - psychology
Primary Health Care - methods
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
The association between pain and diabetes in older people has been largely unexplored. The aim of this survey was to analyze the prevalence and characteristics of pain among Finnish men and women 65 or older with and without diabetes in primary care.
All home-dwelling persons 65 years or older with diabetes (N?=?527) and age and gender matched controls (N?=?890) were identified from electronic patient records. Frequent pain was regarded as any pain experienced more often than once a week, and it was divided into pain experienced several times a week but not daily and pain experienced daily or continuously. The Numeric Rating Scale (0-10) (NRS) was used to assess the intensity and interference of the pain.
The number of subjects who returned the questionnaire was 1084 (76.5%). The prevalence of frequent pain in the preceding week was 50% among women without diabetes and 63% among women with diabetes (adjusted, p?=?0.22). In men, the corresponding proportions were 42% without diabetes and 47% with diabetes (adjusted, p?=?0.58). In both genders, depressive symptoms and the number of comorbidities were associated with pain experienced more often than once a week and with daily pain. Diabetes was not associated with pain intensity or pain interference in either women or men.
Pain in older adults is associated with depressive symptoms and the number of comorbidities more than with diabetes itself.
Notes
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2000 Feb;32(2):531-9 PMID 10694143
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2011 Jan;34(1):71-6 PMID 20929992
Cites: JAMA. 2003 Nov 12;290(18):2435-42 PMID 14612480
Cites: J Rheumatol. 2009 Feb;36(2):371-7 PMID 19012358
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2016 May;44(3):258-63 PMID 26647094
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1988 Jul 1;109 (1):18-24 PMID 3377350
Cites: Lancet. 2016 Apr 9;387(10027):1513-30 PMID 27061677
Cites: Ann Acad Med Singapore. 1994 Mar;23(2):129-38 PMID 8080219
Cites: J Gen Intern Med. 2012 Dec;27(12):1674-81 PMID 22854982
Cites: BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2015 Nov 20;16:364 PMID 26589716
Cites: Diabet Med. 2010 May;27(5):578-84 PMID 20536955
Cites: Duodecim. 2016;132(9):881-2 PMID 27319085
Cites: Curr Opin Rheumatol. 2009 Jan;21(1):50-4 PMID 19077719
Cites: Pain. 2013 Dec;154(12):2649-57 PMID 24287107
Cites: Addiction. 1993 Jun;88(6):791-804 PMID 8329970
Cites: J Rheumatol. 2005 Jul;32(7):1341-8 PMID 15996075
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2006 Jul;29(7):1518-22 PMID 16801572
Cites: Pain. 2008 Jul;137(1):34-40 PMID 17869422
Cites: Pain. 1998 Sep;77(3):231-9 PMID 9808348
Cites: BMJ Open. 2016 Jun 20;6(6):e010364 PMID 27324708
Cites: Muscles Ligaments Tendons J. 2016 May 19;6(1):26-34 PMID 27331029
Cites: BMJ. 2001 Sep 22;323(7314):662-5 PMID 11566829
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2006 Mar;29(3):725-31 PMID 16505540
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2007 Jun 11;167(11):1137-44 PMID 17563021
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2012 Dec;35(12):2650-64 PMID 23100048
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 2009 Oct 15;61(10):1328-36 PMID 19790111
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2011 Oct;34(10 ):2220-4 PMID 21852677
PubMed ID
29544464 View in PubMed
Less detail

170 records – page 1 of 17.