Skip header and navigation

Refine By

175 records – page 1 of 18.

Validity of a single question to assess habitual physical activity of community-dwelling older people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290450
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2017 Nov; 27(11):1423-1430
Publication Type
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Date
Nov-2017
Author
E Portegijs
S Sipilä
A Viljanen
M Rantakokko
T Rantanen
Author Affiliation
Gerontology Research Center and Department of Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2017 Nov; 27(11):1423-1430
Date
Nov-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Exercise
Female
Finland
Humans
Independent living
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mobility Limitation
Self Report
Surveys and Questionnaires
Walking
Abstract
The aim is to determine concurrent validity of a single self-report habitual physical activity (PA) question against accelerometer-based PA and mobility variables, and corresponding changes in self-reported PA and mobility. Cross-sectional and longitudinal data of the "Life-space mobility in old age" (LISPE) cohort and its substudy on PA were utilized. At baseline, 848 community-dwelling, 75- to 90-year-old people living independently in central Finland participated in home-based interviews. One and 2 years later, 816 and 761 of them were reassessed by phone, respectively. Tri-axial accelerometer data over 7 days were collected following the baseline assessments in a subsample of 174. Self-reported habitual PA was assessed based on intensity and duration using a single question with seven response options (range: mostly resting to competitive sports). Mobility variables were as follows: life-space mobility, walking difficulty over 500 m, and short physical performance battery. Statistically significant correlations were found between self-reported habitual PA and mobility (Spearman correlation coefficient Rs = 0.40-0.61) and accelerometer-based PA variables [step counts (Rs = 0.49), time in moderate (Rs = 0.49) and low intensity (Rs = 0.40) PA, and time in sedentary behavior (Rs = -0.28)]. A decline in self-reported habitual PA over time was associated with 5-10p decline in life-space mobility (PA improvement with 0-3p increase) and with developing a higher degree of walking difficulty (in 35-44% of participants). In conclusion, based on these results, the self-report question to assess habitual PA is valid and responsive to change and thus useful for epidemiological research in community-dwelling older people, also in follow-up studies.
PubMed ID
27747944 View in PubMed
Less detail

Perceived environmental barriers to outdoor mobility and changes in sense of autonomy in participation outdoors among older people: a prospective two-year cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290462
Source
Aging Ment Health. 2017 Aug; 21(8):805-809
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Aug-2017
Author
Merja Rantakokko
Erja Portegijs
Anne Viljanen
Susanne Iwarsson
Markku Kauppinen
Taina Rantanen
Author Affiliation
a Gerontology Research Center and Department of Health Sciences , University of Jyväskylä , Jyväskylä , Finland.
Source
Aging Ment Health. 2017 Aug; 21(8):805-809
Date
Aug-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Community Participation - statistics & numerical data
Environment
Female
Finland
Humans
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Male
Mobility Limitation
Personal Autonomy
Abstract
The aim was to study whether perceived environmental barriers to outdoor mobility affect changes in sense of autonomy in participation outdoors among community-dwelling older people over a two-year period.
Community-dwelling people aged 75-90 years (n = 848) in central Finland were interviewed on two occasions, face-to-face at baseline and over the telephone two years later. Perceived environmental barriers to outdoor mobility were assessed using a 15-item structured questionnaire, and the sum scores categorized into tertiles (0, 1 and 2 or more barriers). Autonomy in participation outdoors was assessed with the 'Impact on Participation and Autonomy' (IPA) questionnaire using the autonomy outdoors subscale (score range 0-20, higher scores indicating more restricted autonomy).
Scores for autonomy in participation outdoors were available for 848 participants at baseline (mean 6.2, SD = 3.8) and for 748 participants at the two-year follow-up (mean 6.7, SD = 3.9). At baseline, those reporting multiple environmental barriers had the most restricted autonomy, while those reporting no environmental barriers had the least restricted autonomy (p
PubMed ID
26979293 View in PubMed
Less detail

Comparison of Summer and Winter Objectively Measured Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior in Older Adults: Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility Reykjavik Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290965
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2017 10 21; 14(10):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Date
10-21-2017
Author
Nanna Yr Arnardottir
Nina Dora Oskarsdottir
Robert J Brychta
Annemarie Koster
Dane R van Domelen
Paolo Caserotti
Gudny Eiriksdottir
Johanna E Sverrisdottir
Erlingur Johannsson
Lenore J Launer
Vilmundur Gudnason
Tamara B Harris
Kong Y Chen
Thorarinn Sveinsson
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Education, University of Akureyri, Nordurslod 2, 600 Akureyri, Iceland. nanna@unak.is.
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2017 10 21; 14(10):
Date
10-21-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Keywords
Accelerometry
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Exercise
Female
Humans
Iceland
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Male
Seasons
Sedentary lifestyle
Abstract
In Iceland, there is a large variation in daylight between summer and winter. The aim of the study was to identify how this large variation influences physical activity (PA) and sedentary behavior (SB). Free living PA was measured by a waist-worn accelerometer for one week during waking hours in 138 community-dwelling older adults (61.1% women, 80.3 ± 4.9 years) during summer and winter months. In general, SB occupied about 75% of the registered wear-time and was highly correlated with age (ß = 0.36). Although the differences were small, more time was spent during the summer in all PA categories, except for the moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA), and SB was reduced. More lifestyle PA (LSPA) was accumulated in =5-min bouts during summer than winter, especially among highly active participants. This information could be important for policy makers and health professionals working with older adults. Accounting for seasonal difference is necessary in analyzing SB and PA data.
Notes
Cites: BMC Med Res Methodol. 2009 Aug 10;9:58 PMID 19664254
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2001 Jan 15;153(2):172-83 PMID 11159163
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2014 Mar 27;14:284 PMID 24673834
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2007 May 1;165(9):1076-87 PMID 17351290
Cites: Ann Hum Biol. 2014 Jan-Feb;41(1):1-8 PMID 23992280
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2011 Apr;43(4):647-54 PMID 20689449
Cites: Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2009 Jun 29;6:36 PMID 19563650
Cites: Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2009 Apr;34(2):182-90 PMID 19370048
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2007 Aug;39(8):1423-34 PMID 17762377
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2008 Jan;40(1):181-8 PMID 18091006
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2010 Nov;64(11):1010-6 PMID 19843499
Cites: Ann Hum Biol. 2008 Mar-Apr;35(2):154-69 PMID 18428010
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Nov;88(5):1225-31 PMID 18996856
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2007 Aug;39(8):1435-45 PMID 17762378
Cites: J Aging Phys Act. 2009 Jan;17(1):17-30 PMID 19299836
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2013 Aug;45(8):1493-500 PMID 23475142
Cites: J Intern Med. 2007 Sep;262(3):273-87 PMID 17697152
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 1993 Jun;25(6):755-60 PMID 8321115
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2005 Nov;37(11 Suppl):S512-22 PMID 16294114
Cites: Public Health. 2007 Dec;121(12):909-22 PMID 17920646
Cites: Prev Chronic Dis. 2008 Oct;5(4):A131 PMID 18793519
Cites: J Phys Act Health. 2009 Mar;6(2):252-61 PMID 19420404
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2004 Aug;36(8):1364-71 PMID 15292745
Cites: Int J Biometeorol. 2005 Nov;50(2):83-9 PMID 16044348
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2016 Mar;48(3):430-8 PMID 26460633
Cites: J Phys Act Health. 2011 Jan;8(1):36-44 PMID 21297183
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2010 Nov 15;172(10):1155-65 PMID 20843864
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2009 Apr;63(4):305-9 PMID 19074181
Cites: Diabetes. 2007 Nov;56(11):2655-67 PMID 17827399
Cites: J Aging Phys Act. 2008 Jan;16(1):3-13 PMID 18212390
Cites: Eur Urol. 2007 Sep;52(3):708-14 PMID 17174467
Cites: Age Ageing. 2013 Mar;42(2):222-9 PMID 23117467
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2012 May;66(5):474-6 PMID 21325149
Cites: Obes Res. 2004 Apr;12(4):688-94 PMID 15090638
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2005 Nov;37(11 Suppl):S490-500 PMID 16294112
Cites: Sports Med. 2001 Feb;31(2):91-100 PMID 11227981
Cites: Sports Med. 2009;39(1):29-43 PMID 19093694
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2006 Feb;38(2):367-72 PMID 16531908
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2010 May 15;171(10):1055-64 PMID 20406758
Cites: Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2006 Aug 07;3:21 PMID 16893452
Cites: Health Place. 2007 Sep;13(3):588-602 PMID 16935020
Cites: J Aging Phys Act. 2014 Apr;22(2):226-34 PMID 23752449
Cites: Ann Behav Med. 2004 Dec;28(3):158-62 PMID 15576253
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1989 Jan;129(1):76-88 PMID 2910074
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 1992 Sep;40(9):922-35 PMID 1512391
PubMed ID
29065475 View in PubMed
Less detail

Inner strength and its relationship to health threats in ageing-A cross-sectional study among community-dwelling older women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292392
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2017 Nov; 73(11):2720-2729
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2017
Author
Erika Boman
Berit Lundman
Björn Nygren
Kristofer Årestedt
Regina Santamäki Fischer
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing, Åland University of Applied Sciences, Mariehamn, Finland.
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2017 Nov; 73(11):2720-2729
Date
Nov-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland
Humans
Independent living
Mental health
Middle Aged
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
To explore the relationship between inner strength and health threats among community-dwelling older women.
Inner strength is described as a resource that promotes experiences of health, despite adversities. Inner strength and its dimensions (i.e. connectedness, creativity, firmness and flexibility) can be assessed using the Inner Strength Scale (ISS). Exploring attributes of weaker inner strength may yield valuable information about areas to focus on in enhancing a person's inner strength and may ultimately lead to the perception of better health.
Cross-sectional questionnaire survey.
The study is based on responses from 1270 community-dwelling older women aged 65 years and older; these were collected in the year 2010 and describe the situation that still exists today for older women. The questionnaire included the ISS, background characteristics and explanatory variables known to be health threats in ageing. Data were analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics.
Poorer mental health was related to weaker inner strength in total and in all the dimensions. Symptoms of depressive disorders and feeling lonely were related to three of the dimensions, except firmness and creativity respectively. Furthermore, poor physical health was associated with the dimensions firmness and flexibility. Other health threats were significantly related to only one of the dimensions, or not associated at all.
Mental ill health has overall the strongest association with weaker inner strength. Longitudinal studies are recommended to confirm the results. However, the ISS does not only estimate inner strength but can also be a tool for discovering where (i.e. dimension) interventions may be most profitable.
PubMed ID
28513995 View in PubMed
Less detail

Obese very old women have low relative hangrip strength, poor physical function, and difficulties in daily living.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266901
Source
J Nutr Health Aging. 2015 Jan;19(1):20-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2015
Author
H-J Dong
J. Marcusson
E. Wressle
M. Unosson
Source
J Nutr Health Aging. 2015 Jan;19(1):20-5
Date
Jan-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged, 80 and over
Anthropometry
Body Composition
Body Height
Body mass index
Body Weight
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Hand Strength - physiology
Humans
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Linear Models
Obesity - physiopathology
Overweight - physiopathology
Skinfold thickness
Sweden
Waist Circumference
Abstract
To investigate whether anthropometric and body composition variables and handgrip strength (HS) were associated with physical function and independent daily living in 88-year-old Swedish women.
A cross-sectional analysis of 83 community-dwelling women aged 88 years who were of normal weight (n=30), overweight (n=29), and obese (n=24) was performed.
Body weight (Wt), height, waist circumference (WC), and arm circumference were assessed using an electronic scale and a measuring tape. Tricep skinfold thickness was measured using a skinfold calliper. Fat mass (FM) and fat-free mass (FFM) were measured using bioelectrical impedance analysis, and HS was recorded with an electronic grip force instrument. Linear regression was used to determine the contributions of parameters as a single predictor or as a ratio of HS to physical function (Short Form-36, SF-36PF) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADL).
Obese women had greater absolute FM and FFM and lower HS corrected for FFM and HS-based ratios (i.e., HS/Wt, HS/body mass index [BMI]) than their normal weight and overweight counterparts. After adjusting for physical activity levels and the number of chronic diseases, HS-based ratios explained more variance in SF-36PF scoring (R2, 0.52-0.54) than single anthropometric and body composition variables (R2, 0.45-0.51). WC, HS, and HS-based ratios (HS/Wt and HS/FFM) were also associated with independence in IADL.
Obese very old women have a high WC but their HS is relatively low in relation to their Wt and FFM. These parameters are better than BMI for predicting physical function and independent daily living.
PubMed ID
25560812 View in PubMed
Less detail

Anxiety, depression, and 1-year incident cognitive impairment in community-dwelling older adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132631
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2011 Aug;59(8):1421-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Olivier Potvin
Hélène Forget
Sébastien Grenier
Michel Préville
Carol Hudon
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Québec, Canada. Olivier.Potvin@crulrg.ulaval.ca
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2011 Aug;59(8):1421-8
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Cognition Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Female
Geriatric Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Health Surveys
Humans
Incidence
Independent Living - psychology
Male
Mental Status Schedule - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics
Quebec
Abstract
To examine in men and women the independent associations between anxiety and depression and 1-year incident cognitive impairment and to examine the association of cognitive impairment, no dementia (CIND) and incident cognitive impairment with 1-year incident anxiety or depression.
Prospective cohort study.
General community.
Population-based sample of 1,942 individuals aged 65 to 96.
Two structured interviews 12 months apart evaluated anxiety and mood symptoms and disorders according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, criteria. Incident cognitive impairment was defined as no CIND at baseline and a follow-up Mini-Mental State Examination score at least 2 points below baseline and below the 15th percentile according to normative data. The associations between cognitive impairment and anxiety or depression were assessed using logistic regression adjusted for potential confounders.
Incident cognitive impairment was, independently of depression, associated with baseline anxiety disorders in men (odds ratio (OR)=6.27, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.39-28.29) and anxiety symptoms in women (OR=2.14, 95%=1.06-4.34). Moreover, the results indicated that depression disorders in men (OR=8.87, 95%=2.13-36.96) and anxiety symptoms in women (OR=4.31, 95%=1.74-10.67) were particularly linked to incident amnestic cognitive impairment, whereas anxiety disorders in men (OR=12.01, 95%=1.73-83.26) were especially associated with incident nonamnestic cognitive impairment. CIND at baseline and incident cognitive impairment were not associated with incident anxiety or depression.
Anxiety and depression appear to have different relationships with incident cognitive impairment according to sex and the nature of cognitive impairment. Clinicians should pay particular attention to anxiety in older adults because it may shortly be followed by incident cognitive treatment.
PubMed ID
21797836 View in PubMed
Less detail

Aging in rural Canada: a retrospective and review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132883
Source
Can J Aging. 2011 Sep;30(3):323-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
Norah Keating
Jennifer Swindle
Stephanie Fletcher
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Ecology, University of Alberta. Norah.keating@ualberta.ca
Source
Can J Aging. 2011 Sep;30(3):323-38
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging
Canada
Family
Health Services for the Aged
Humans
Independent living
Leisure Activities
Research
Retrospective Studies
Rural Population
Social Participation
Social Support
Work
Abstract
Research on rural aging has developed considerably since publication of the book Aging in Rural Canada (Butterworths, 1991). The purpose of this article is twofold: to provide a retrospective on issues in rural aging from this book, and to review Canadian literature on rural aging since its publication. The review highlights new directions in conceptual definitions of rural, and in issues of social engagement, independence, family and social networks, and rural services and health. Two main research lenses are evident. The marginalization lens focuses on rural seniors with health problems, but has not included those marginalized by poverty or gender. The aging-well lens focuses on contributions and engagement, but has omitted research on social relationships and quality of family interaction. The report includes a call for interrogation about interaction between people and place, and for understanding issues of rural diversity and processes of rural aging.
PubMed ID
21767464 View in PubMed
Less detail

Formal home help services and institutionalization.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132916
Source
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2012 Mar-Apr;54(2):e52-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
Yukari Yamada
Volkert Siersma
Kirsten Avlund
Mikkel Vass
Author Affiliation
Section of Social Medicine, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Oester Farimagsgade 5, DK-1014, Copenhagen, Denmark. yuya@sund.ku.dk
Source
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2012 Mar-Apr;54(2):e52-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged - statistics & numerical data
Aged, 80 and over
Chi-Square Distribution
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Home Care Services - statistics & numerical data
Housekeeping - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Institutionalization - statistics & numerical data
Male
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Abstract
The effect of home help services has been inconsistent. Raising the hypothesis that receiving small amounts of home help may postpone or prevent institutionalization, the aim of the present study is to analyze how light and heavy use of home help services was related to the risk for institutionalization. The study was a secondary analysis of a Danish intervention study on preventive home visits in 34 municipalities from 1999 to 2003, including 2642 home-dwelling older people who were nondisabled and did not receive public home help services at baseline in 1999 and who lived at home 18 months after baseline. Cox regression analysis showed that those who received home help services during the first 18 months after baseline were at higher risk of being institutionalized during the subsequent three years than those who did not receive such services. However, receiving home help for less than 1h per week during the first 18 months after baseline was not associated with an increased risk of institutionalization during the study period among those with physical or mental decline. Receiving public home help services was a strong indicator for institutionalization in Denmark. Receiving small amounts of home help and experiencing physical or mental decline was not associated with higher hazard for institutionalization compared with those who received no help.
PubMed ID
21764144 View in PubMed
Less detail

Dependency and transfer incomes in idiopathic Parkinson's disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263808
Source
Dan Med J. 2014 Oct;61(10):A4915
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
Charlotte Starhof
Niels Anker
Tove Henriksen
Christina Funch Lassen
Source
Dan Med J. 2014 Oct;61(10):A4915
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Denmark - epidemiology
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Income - statistics & numerical data
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Homes - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Parkinson Disease - economics - epidemiology
Registries
Young Adult
Abstract
Idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder affecting approximately 1% of the population above 65 years of age. The aim of this study was to define the estimated Danish IPD population and to elucidate source of income and labour market affiliation for working-age IPD patients.
IPD cases were included through the Danish Register of Medicinal Product Statistics. The participants had to be alive by the end of 2010 and at least twice have cashed in prescriptions on IPD medication in the 2009-2010 period. Information on employment status and transfer income was retrieved through the DREAM database under the Danish Ministry of Employment.
A total of 7,033 estimated IPD patients were identified. The mean age at time of registration (2010, week 50) was 72 years. Overall, 7% of the IPD patients were employed and 5% were self-supportive. In the working age range (18-64 years), 25% were employed and 10% enrolled in supported employment. Compared with the age-adjusted general population, twice as many IPD patients were outside the ordinary labour market and, furthermore, the proportion receiving anticipatory pension was increased threefold. The majority (89%) of the patients were living at home with a spouse (59%). 11% were nursing home residents.
The working age IPD population was more prone to be outside employment and to receive public transfer income than an age-adjusted population sample.
The study was funded by the Danish Parkinson Association.
not relevant.
PubMed ID
25283617 View in PubMed
Less detail

Collective action for a common service platform for independent living services.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263914
Source
Int J Med Inform. 2013 Oct;82(10):922-39
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Fatemeh Nikayin
Mark De Reuver
Timo Itälä
Source
Int J Med Inform. 2013 Oct;82(10):922-39
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cooperative Behavior
Delivery of Health Care - organization & administration
Finland
Home Care Services - organization & administration
Independent living
Interinstitutional Relations
Leadership
Models, organizational
Organizational Objectives
Abstract
The paper aims to explain how and why organizations, providing assistive devices and related web services for elderly independent living services, might be willing to collaborate and to share their resources and data on a common service platform.
A theoretical framework from literature on collective action theory, platform and business ecosystem concepts was developed to explain what factors influence inter-organizational collective action for a common service platform. The framework was tested in a case study of collaborative platform project for independent living services in Finland. Semi-structured interviews with the project managers and the decision makers of involved organizations were the primary source of data collection.
Strikingly, interdependency among the organizations was not found to be important for collaboration in this case. Instead, we found that a central organization can play an important role in initiating, facilitating and encouraging collaboration among different parties. Moreover, we found more willingness for collaboration when the platform is aimed to be open to third-parties to complement the platform with additional services.
Strategies of the platform leader and openness of the platform towards third parties are the most important drivers for collective action between organizations offering independent living services. Establishing common service platforms for independent living services requires explicit attention to these inter-organizational issues.
PubMed ID
23891564 View in PubMed
Less detail

175 records – page 1 of 18.