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Anxiety, depression, and 1-year incident cognitive impairment in community-dwelling older adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132631
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2011 Aug;59(8):1421-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Olivier Potvin
Hélène Forget
Sébastien Grenier
Michel Préville
Carol Hudon
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Québec, Canada. Olivier.Potvin@crulrg.ulaval.ca
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2011 Aug;59(8):1421-8
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Cognition Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Female
Geriatric Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Health Surveys
Humans
Incidence
Independent Living - psychology
Male
Mental Status Schedule - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics
Quebec
Abstract
To examine in men and women the independent associations between anxiety and depression and 1-year incident cognitive impairment and to examine the association of cognitive impairment, no dementia (CIND) and incident cognitive impairment with 1-year incident anxiety or depression.
Prospective cohort study.
General community.
Population-based sample of 1,942 individuals aged 65 to 96.
Two structured interviews 12 months apart evaluated anxiety and mood symptoms and disorders according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, criteria. Incident cognitive impairment was defined as no CIND at baseline and a follow-up Mini-Mental State Examination score at least 2 points below baseline and below the 15th percentile according to normative data. The associations between cognitive impairment and anxiety or depression were assessed using logistic regression adjusted for potential confounders.
Incident cognitive impairment was, independently of depression, associated with baseline anxiety disorders in men (odds ratio (OR)=6.27, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.39-28.29) and anxiety symptoms in women (OR=2.14, 95%=1.06-4.34). Moreover, the results indicated that depression disorders in men (OR=8.87, 95%=2.13-36.96) and anxiety symptoms in women (OR=4.31, 95%=1.74-10.67) were particularly linked to incident amnestic cognitive impairment, whereas anxiety disorders in men (OR=12.01, 95%=1.73-83.26) were especially associated with incident nonamnestic cognitive impairment. CIND at baseline and incident cognitive impairment were not associated with incident anxiety or depression.
Anxiety and depression appear to have different relationships with incident cognitive impairment according to sex and the nature of cognitive impairment. Clinicians should pay particular attention to anxiety in older adults because it may shortly be followed by incident cognitive treatment.
PubMed ID
21797836 View in PubMed
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Are high school students living in lodgings at an increased risk for internalizing problems?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98963
Source
J Adolesc. 2010 Jun;33(3):439-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
Wenche Wannebo
Lars Wichstrøm
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health Sciences, Nord-Trøndelag University College, Steinkjer, Norway. wenche.wannebo@hint.no
Source
J Adolesc. 2010 Jun;33(3):439-47
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Behavioral Symptoms - diagnosis - psychology
Depression - diagnosis - psychology
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Independent Living - psychology
Internal-External Control
Loneliness - psychology
Male
Norway
Object Attachment
Personality Inventory - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics
Sex Factors
Social Environment
Students - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
This study aimed to investigate whether leaving home to live in lodgings during senior high school can be a risk factor for the development of internalizing problems. Utilizing two large-scale prospective community studies of 2399 and 3906 Norwegian students (age range 15-19 years), respectively, the difference in internalizing symptoms between adolescents living in lodgings and adolescents living with their parents during senior high school was examined. Female students living in lodgings had higher scores on internalizing problems than female students living at home, whereas no differences were found for males. Living in lodgings did not predict later internalizing problems, and prior internalizing problems did not predict moving into lodgings. It is therefore suggested that the negative effect of living in lodgings on high school students' well-being is temporary.
PubMed ID
19631976 View in PubMed
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Aspects of housing and perceived health among ADL independent and ADL dependent groups of older people in three national samples.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113316
Source
Aging Clin Exp Res. 2013 Jun;25(3):317-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Signe Tomsone
Vibeke Horstmann
Frank Oswald
Susanne Iwarsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Box 157, 221 00, Lund, Sweden. Signe.Tomsone@med.lu.se
Source
Aging Clin Exp Res. 2013 Jun;25(3):317-28
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - psychology
Dependency (Psychology)
Female
Geriatric Assessment
Germany
Health status
Housing
Humans
Independent Living - psychology
Latvia
Male
Regression Analysis
Residence Characteristics
Self Concept
Sweden
Abstract
Good housing solutions are important for the ageing population in order to promote health and maintain functional ability. The objective of this study was to investigate whether and how objective and perceived aspects of housing were related to perceived health among ADL independent and ADL dependent groups of older, single-living people within three national samples.
The current study was based on national samples (German, n = 450; Latvian, n = 303; Swedish, n = 397) from the European ENABLE-AGE Project, using data on ADL dependence, perceived health, objective and perceived aspects of housing. Descriptive statistics, correlations and multivariate ordinal regression models were used to analyze the data.
The participants in the ADL dependent groups generally were older, had more functional limitations and perceived their health as poorer compared to ADL independent groups. With regard to perceived housing, usability as well as meaning of home indicators was often lower in the ADL dependent groups, housing satisfaction was at the same level while housing-related external control beliefs were higher. The differences among the national samples were highly significant for both ADL groups, for all variables except number of outdoor environmental barriers in the ADL independent groups. The relations between perceived health on one hand and objective and perceived aspects of housing on the other show great diversities among the ADL groups and the national samples.
The results serve to alert health care practitioners that it is important to draw attention to how older people perceive their housing situation and to the fact that different levels of functional independence demand different interventions.
PubMed ID
23740591 View in PubMed
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Attending an activity center: positive experiences of a group of home-dwelling persons with early-stage dementia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264606
Source
Clin Interv Aging. 2014;9:1923-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Ulrika Söderhamn
Live Aasgaard
Bjørg Landmark
Source
Clin Interv Aging. 2014;9:1923-31
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Dementia - therapy
Exercise
Female
Humans
Independent Living - psychology
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Patient satisfaction
Qualitative Research
Social Participation
Abstract
In Norway, there is a focus on home-dwelling people with dementia receiving the opportunity to participate in organized meaningful activities. The aim of this study was to elucidate the experiences of home-dwelling persons with early-stage dementia who attend an activity center and participate in adapted physical and social activities delivered by nurses and volunteers.
The study adopted a qualitative approach, with individual interviews conducted among eight people diagnosed with early-stage dementia. The interview texts were analyzed using manifest and latent content analysis.
Four categories, ie, "appreciated activities", "praised nurses and volunteers", "being more active", and "being included in a fellowship", as well as the overall theme "participation in appreciated activities and a sense of feeling included in a fellowship may have a positive influence on health and well-being" emerged in the analysis. The informants appreciated the adapted physical and social activities and expressed their enjoyment and gratitude. They found the physical activities useful, and they felt themselves to be included in a fellowship through cheerful nurses and volunteers. The nurses were able to create a good atmosphere and spread joy in the center together with the volunteers. The informants felt themselves valued as the persons they were. These findings indicated that such activities may have had a positive influence on the informants' health and well-being.
In order to succeed with this kind of activity center, it is decisive that the nurses are able to tailor meaningful activities and create an environment where the persons with dementia can feel that they are respected and valued. The municipality health care service should implement such activity centers with specialist nurses in dementia care together with volunteers.
Notes
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Cites: J Alzheimers Dis. 2014;39(4):833-924296815
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Cites: Aging Ment Health. 2010 May;14(4):450-6020455121
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Cites: Int J Older People Nurs. 2010 Sep;5(3):228-3420925706
Cites: Nurs Ethics. 2011 Sep;18(5):651-6121893576
Cites: Aging Ment Health. 2012;16(3):378-9022250961
Cites: Aging Ment Health. 2013;17(3):293-923323753
Cites: JAMA Intern Med. 2013 May 27;173(10):894-90123589097
Cites: Aging Ment Health. 2007 Mar;11(2):119-3017453545
PubMed ID
25419121 View in PubMed
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Change in psychotropic drug use among community-dwelling people aged 75 years and older in Finland: repeated cross-sectional population studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134674
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2011 Oct;23(8):1278-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
Franciska Desplenter
Charlotte Caenen
Jolein Meelberghs
Sirpa Hartikainen
Raimo Sulkava
J Simon Bell
Author Affiliation
Kuopio Research Centre of Geriatric Care, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2011 Oct;23(8):1278-84
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Anxiety Agents - therapeutic use
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Chi-Square Distribution
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health status
Humans
Hypnotics and Sedatives - therapeutic use
Independent Living - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Logistic Models
Male
Odds Ratio
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Psychotropic Drugs - therapeutic use
Socioeconomic Factors
Statistics, nonparametric
Abstract
Older people are at high risk of experiencing psychotropic-related adverse drug events. The objective of this study was to compare and contrast the use of psychotropic drugs among community-dwelling people aged = 75 years in 1998 and 2004.
Comparable random samples of people aged = 75 years were extracted from the population register in Kuopio, Finland, in 1998 (n = 700) and 2003 (n = 1000). In 1998 and 2004, 523 and 700 community-dwelling people respectively participated in nurse interviews, during which demographic, diagnostic and drug use data were elicited. Logistic regression was used to compute unadjusted and adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the prevalence of psychotropic drug use in 2004 compared to 1998.
The unadjusted prevalence of total psychotropic (37.3% and 38.4%, OR 1.05; 95% CI 0.83-1.33), anxiolytic, hypnotic and sedative (29.6% and 31.3%, OR 1.08, 95% CI 0.85-1.38), and antidepressant (10.7% and 11.9%, OR 1.12, 95% CI 0.78-1.61) use were similar in 1998 and 2004. There was a decrease in the unadjusted prevalence of antipsychotic use (9.2% and 5.7%, OR 0.60; 95% CI 0.39-0.93). After adjusting for socioeconomic and health status differences, there was an increase in the prevalence of total psychotropic (adjusted OR 1.31, 95% CI 1.01-1.70) and antidepressant (OR 1.59, 95% CI 1.06-2.40) use.
The unadjusted prevalence of psychotropic drug use remained stable between 1998 and 2004. However, in adjusted analyses there was a small increase in the prevalence of any psychotropic drug use and antidepressant use specifically.
PubMed ID
21554797 View in PubMed
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Change in quality of life in relation to returning to work after acquired brain injury: a population-based register study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302993
Source
Brain Inj. 2018; 32(13-14):1731-1739
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2018
Author
Marie Matérne
Thomas Strandberg
Lars-Olov Lundqvist
Author Affiliation
a University Health Care Research Center, Region Örebro County , Örebro , Sweden.
Source
Brain Inj. 2018; 32(13-14):1731-1739
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Automobile Driving - statistics & numerical data
Brain Injuries - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology - rehabilitation
Community Health Planning
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Glasgow Outcome Scale
Humans
Independent Living - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Quality of Life - psychology
Return to Work - statistics & numerical data
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
This study investigated changes in quality of life (QoL) in relation to return to work among patients with acquired brain injury (ABI).
The sample consisted of 1487 patients with ABI (63% men) aged 18-66 years (mean age 52) from the WebRehab Sweden national quality register database. Only patients who worked at least 50% at admission to hospital and were on full sick leave at discharge from hospital were included. QoL was measured by the EuroQol EQ-5D questionnaire.
Patients who returned to work perceived a larger improvement in QoL from discharge to follow-up one year after injury compared to patients who had not returned to work. This difference remained after adjustment for other factors associated with improved QoL, such as having a university education, increased Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale scores and getting one's driving licence reinstated.
Return to work is an important factor for change in QoL among patients with ABI, even after adjusting for other factors related to QoL. This is consistent with the hypothesis that having employment is meaningful, increases self-esteem and fosters participation in society. Thus, helping patients with ABI return to work has a positive influence on QoL.
PubMed ID
30296173 View in PubMed
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Concern about falling in older women with a history of falls: associations with health, functional ability, physical activity and quality of life.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106791
Source
Gerontology. 2014;60(1):22-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Radhika Patil
Kirsti Uusi-Rasi
Pekka Kannus
Saija Karinkanta
Harri Sievänen
Author Affiliation
The UKK Institute for Health Promotion Research, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland.
Source
Gerontology. 2014;60(1):22-30
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - prevention & control
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology - psychology
Fear - psychology
Female
Finland
Health status
Humans
Independent Living - psychology
Logistic Models
Motor Activity
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Abstract
Fear of falling has been linked to activity restriction, functional decline, decreased quality of life and increased risk of falling. Factors that distinguish persons with a high concern about falling from those with low concern have not been systematically studied.
This study aimed to expose potential health-related, functional and psychosocial factors that correlate with fear of falling among independently living older women who had fallen in the past year.
Baseline data of 409 women aged 70-80 years recruited to a randomised falls prevention trial (DEX) (NCT00986466) were used. Participants were classified according to their level of concern about falling using the Falls Efficacy Scale International (FES-I). Multinomial logistic regression analyses were performed to explore associations between health-related variables, functional performance tests, amount of physical activity, quality of life and FES-I scores.
68% of the participants reported a moderate to high concern (FES-I = 20) about falls. Multinomial logistic regression showed that highly concerned women were significantly more likely to have poorer health and quality of life and lower functional ability. Reported difficulties in instrumental activities of daily living, balance, outdoor mobility and poorer quality of life contributed independently to a greater concern about falling.
Concern about falling was highly prevalent in our sample of community-living older women. In particular, poor perceived general health and mobility constraints contributed independently to the difference between high and low concern of falling. Knowledge of these associations may help in developing interventions to reduce fear of falling and activity avoidance in old age.
PubMed ID
24107382 View in PubMed
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Dietary resilience as described by older community-dwelling adults from the NuAge study "if there is a will -there is a way!".

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128482
Source
Appetite. 2012 Apr;58(2):730-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Elisabeth Vesnaver
Heather H Keller
Hélène Payette
Bryna Shatenstein
Author Affiliation
University of Guelph, Department of Family Relations and Applied Human Nutrition, Macdonald Institute, Guelph, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Appetite. 2012 Apr;58(2):730-8
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology
Diet
Eating - physiology
Female
Food - economics
Health promotion
Health status
Humans
Independent Living - psychology
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Quebec
Residence Characteristics
Abstract
Many older adults experience age-related changes that can have negative consequences for food intake. Some older adults continue to eat well despite these challenges showing dietary resilience. We aimed to describe the strategies used by older adults to overcome dietary obstacles and to explore the key themes of dietary resilience. The sample was drawn from the five-year Québec Longitudinal Study "NuAge". It included 30 participants (80% female) aged 73-87 years; 10 with decreased diet quality and 20 with steady or increased diet quality; all had faced key barriers to eating well. Semi-structured interviews explored how age-related changes affected participants' experiences with eating. Thematic analysis revealed strategies used to overcome eating, shopping, and meal preparation difficulties. Key themes of dietary resilience were: prioritizing eating well, doing whatever it takes to keep eating well, being able to do it yourself, getting help when you need it. Implications for health professionals are discussed.
PubMed ID
22200412 View in PubMed
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Effects of 12-month home-based physiotherapy on duration of living at home and functional capacity among older persons with signs of frailty or with a recent hip fracture - protocol of a randomized controlled trial (HIPFRA study).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301757
Source
BMC Geriatr. 2018 10 01; 18(1):232
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
10-01-2018
Author
Paula Soukkio
Sara Suikkanen
Sanna Kääriä
Hannu Kautiainen
Sarianna Sipilä
Katriina Kukkonen-Harjula
Markku Hupli
Author Affiliation
Rehabilitation, South Karelia Social and Health Care District, Valto Käkelän katu 3, FI-53130, Lappeenranta, Finland. paula.soukkio@eksote.fi.
Source
BMC Geriatr. 2018 10 01; 18(1):232
Date
10-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Accidental Falls - prevention & control
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Frail Elderly - psychology
Hip Fractures - epidemiology - psychology - rehabilitation
Home Care Services - trends
Humans
Independent Living - psychology - trends
Male
Nutrition Assessment
Physical Therapy Modalities - psychology - trends
Quality of Life - psychology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Health concerns, such as frailty and osteoporotic fractures decrease functional capacity and increase use of health and social care services in the aging population. The ability to continue living at home is dependent on functional capacity, which can be enhanced by rehabilitation. We study the effects of a 12-month home-based physiotherapy program with 12-month follow-up on duration of living at home, functional capacity, and the use of social and health care services among older persons with signs of frailty, or with a recently operated hip fracture.
This is a non-blinded, parallel group, randomized controlled trial performed in South Karelia Social and Health Care District, Finland (population 131,000). Three hundred community-dwelling older persons with signs of frailty (age?=?65) and 300 persons with a recent hip fracture (age?=?60) will be recruited. Frailty is screened by FRAIL questionnaire and verified by modified Fried's frailty criteria. Both patient groups will be randomized separately to a physiotherapy and a usual care arm. Individualized, structured and progressive physiotherapy will be carried out for 60 min, twice a week for 12 months at the participant's home. The primary outcome at 24 months is duration of living at home. Our hypothesis is that persons assigned to the physiotherapy arm will live at home for six months longer than those in the usual care arm. Secondary outcomes are functional capacity, frailty status, health-related quality-of-life, falls, use and costs of social and health care services, and mortality. Assessments, among others Short Physical Performance Battery, Functional Independence Measure, Mini Nutritional Assessment, and Mini-Mental State Examination will be performed at the participant's home at baseline, 3, 6, and 12 months. Register data on the use and costs of social and health care services, and mortality will be monitored for 24 months.
Our trial will provide new knowledge on the potential of intensive, long-term home-based physiotherapy among older persons at risk for disabilities, to enhance functional capacity and thereby to postpone the need for institutional care, and diminish the use of social and health care services.
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02305433 , Registered Nov 28, 2014.
PubMed ID
30285645 View in PubMed
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Examining the relationship between communities' 'age-friendliness' and life satisfaction and self-perceived health in rural Manitoba, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256516
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2014;14:2594
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Verena H Menec
Scott Nowicki
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. verena.menec@med.umanitoba.ca.
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2014;14:2594
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Environment
Health status
Humans
Independent Living - psychology
Manitoba
Personal Satisfaction
Residence Characteristics
Rural Population
Social Environment
Socioeconomic Factors
Transportation
Abstract
Population aging is a worldwide phenomenon. As a response, the World Health Organization (WHO) introduced the concept of 'age-friendliness' in 2006. Age-friendliness is defined in terms of a range of domains, such as housing, opportunities for participation, and transportation. Communities that accommodate the needs of older adults in these domains will, it is thought, promote healthy, active aging. The purpose of the present study was to examine communities' age-friendliness and its relationship to health-related outcomes in a rural context.
The study included 29 communities located in Manitoba, a mid-Western Canadian province, that are part of the Province of Manitoba's Age-Friendly Manitoba Initiative. As part of a needs assessment process in these communities, 593 individuals, including seniors and younger adults, completed an Age-Friendly Survey. The survey was designed to measure a variety of features in seven domains (the physical environment, housing options, the social environment, opportunities for participation, community supports and healthcare services, transportation options, and communication and information), as well as containing measures of life satisfaction and self-perceived health. Community characteristics were derived from census data. Moreover, communities were categorized on a rural-urban continuum.
Multi-level regressions indicated that an overall Age-Friendly Index was positively related to both life satisfaction (b=0.019, p
PubMed ID
24437338 View in PubMed
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42 records – page 1 of 5.