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Are manual workers at higher risk of death than non-manual employees when living in Swedish municipalities with higher income inequality?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167962
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2007 Apr;17(2):139-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2007
Author
Göran Henriksson
Peter Allebeck
Gunilla Ringbäck Weitoft
Dag Thelle
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Medicine, Göteborg University SE 405 30 Göteborg, Sweden. goran.henriksson@socmed.gu.se
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2007 Apr;17(2):139-44
Date
Apr-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Censuses
Employment - classification - economics - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Income - classification - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - mortality
Occupations - classification - economics - statistics & numerical data
Poisson Distribution
Poverty Areas
Residence Characteristics - classification
Risk factors
Social Class
Sweden - epidemiology
Urban Health - statistics & numerical data
Vulnerable Populations - statistics & numerical data
Workload - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To test the hypothesis that manual workers are at higher risk of death than are non-manual employees when living in municipalities with higher income inequality.
Hierarchical regression was used for the analysis were individuals were nested within municipalities according to the 1990 Swedish census. The outcome was all-cause mortality 1992-1998. The income measure at the individual level was disposable family income weighted against composition of family; the income inequality measure used at the municipality level was the Gini coefficient.
The study population consisted of 1 578 186 people aged 40-64 years in the 1990 Swedish census, who were being reported as unskilled or skilled manual workers, lower-, intermediate-, or high-level non-manual employees.
There was no significant association between income inequality at the municipality level and risk of death, but an expected gradient with unskilled manual workers having the highest risk and high-level non-manual employees having the lowest. However, in the interaction models the relative risk (RR) of death for high-level non-manual employees was decreasing with increasing income inequality (RR = 0.77; 95% CI, 0.63-0.93), whereas the corresponding risk for unskilled manual workers increased with increasing income inequality (RR = 1.24; 95% CI, 1.06-1.46). The RRs for skilled manual, low- and medium- level non-manual employees were not significant. Controlling for income at the individual level did not substantially alter these findings, neither did potential confounders at the municipality level.
The findings suggest that there could be a differential impact from income inequality on risk of death, dependent on individuals' social position.
PubMed ID
16899476 View in PubMed
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Does inequality in self-assessed health predict inequality in survival by income? Evidence from Swedish data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71257
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2003 Nov;57(9):1621-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2003
Author
Eddy van Doorslaer
Ulf G Gerdtham
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Policy and Management, Erasmus University, P.O. Box 1738, 3000 DR Rotterdam, Netherlands. vandoorslaer@bmg.eur.nl
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2003 Nov;57(9):1621-9
Date
Nov-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Educational Status
Empirical Research
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Income - classification - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Proportional Hazards Models
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Self Concept
Socioeconomic Factors
Survival Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
This paper empirically addresses two questions using a large, individual-level Swedish data set which links mortality data to health survey data. The first question is whether there is an effect of an individual's self-assessed health (SAH) on his subsequent survival probability and if this effect differs by socioeconomic factors. Our results indicate that the effect of SAH on mortality risk declines with age-probably because of adjustment towards 'milder' overall health evaluations at higher ages-but does not seem to differ by indicators of socioeconomic status (SES) like income or education. This finding suggests that there is no systematic adjustment of SAH by SES and therefore that any measured income-related inequality in SAH is unlikely to be biased by reporting error. The second question is: how much of the income-related inequality in mortality can be explained by income-related inequality in SAH? Using a decomposition method, we find that inequality in SAH accounts for only about 10% of mortality inequality if interactions are not allowed for, but its contribution is increased to about 28% if account is taken of the reporting tendencies by age. In other words, omitting the interaction between age and SAH leads to a substantial underestimation of the partial contribution of SAH inequality by income. These results suggest that the often observed inequalities in SAH by income do have predictive power for the-less often observed-inequalities in survival by income.
PubMed ID
12948571 View in PubMed
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Economy, community and mortality in British Columbia, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186255
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2003 Apr;56(8):1807-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2003
Author
Gerry Veenstra
Author Affiliation
Department of Anthropology, Centre for Health Services, The University of British Columbia, 6303 N. W. Marine Dr., BC, V6T1Z1, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2003 Apr;56(8):1807-16
Date
Apr-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
British Columbia - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Family Characteristics
Female
Geography
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Income - classification - statistics & numerical data
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Multivariate Analysis
Poverty Areas
Residence Characteristics - classification - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Stimulated by the growing body of literature relating economic inequalities to inequalities in health, this article explores relationships between various economic attributes of communities and mortality rates among 24 coastal communities in British Columbia, Canada. Average household income, a measure of community wealth, was negatively related and the incidence of low incomes, a measure of poverty, was positively related to age-standardized mortality. Both were more strongly related to female than male mortality. Mean and median household income, the incidence of low incomes and a lack of disposable income, and the proportion of total income dollars derived from government sources were significantly related to mortality rates for younger and middle-aged men but not for elderly men. Mortality rates for younger and middle-aged women were not explicated by these economic attributes of communities: among elderly women only, mortality rates were higher in communities with a lower average household income and in those with a higher incidence of low incomes. Finally, a higher concentration in white-collar industries was related to higher mortality rates for females, even after controlling for other economic attributes of communities. These results do not obviously support a psychosocial argument for an individual-level relationship between income and health that assumes residents perceive their status primarily in relation to other members of the same community, but do provide moderate support for the materialist argument and moderate support for the psychosocial argument that assumes community residents perceive their status in relation to an encompassing reference group. Other viable interpretations of these relationships pertain to ecological characteristics of communities that are related to both economic well-being and population health status; in this instance, concentration in specific economic industries may help to understand the ecological relationships presented here.
PubMed ID
12639597 View in PubMed
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Family income, parenting styles and child behavioural-emotional outcomes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167157
Source
Health Econ. 2007 Feb;16(2):145-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2007
Author
Martin Dooley
Jennifer Stewart
Author Affiliation
Department of Economics, McMaster University, Canada.
Source
Health Econ. 2007 Feb;16(2):145-62
Date
Feb-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada - epidemiology
Causality
Child
Child Behavior - psychology
Child Behavior Disorders - economics - epidemiology
Child Development
Child, Preschool
Educational Status
Emotions
Female
Humans
Income - classification - statistics & numerical data
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Marital status
Models, Econometric
Mood Disorders - economics - epidemiology
Parenting - psychology
Public Assistance - statistics & numerical data
Single Parent - psychology
Social Class
Abstract
A positive relationship between income and child outcomes has been observed in data from numerous countries. A key question concerns the extent to which this association represents a causal relationship as opposed to unobserved heterogeneity. We use data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth to implement a series of empirical strategies for estimating the existence and size of the effect of income on behavioural-emotional outcomes. We also examine the role of parenting style. Our results indicate that there is little evidence of an effect of income on behavioural-emotional scores. The exclusion of parenting style from the models was found to not bias the estimated income effect, but parenting style was found to have a consistent impact on child outcomes.
PubMed ID
17024716 View in PubMed
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Gender, income and immigration differences in depression in Canadian urban centres.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164076
Source
Can J Public Health. 2007 Mar-Apr;98(2):149-53
Publication Type
Article
Author
Katherine L W Smith
Flora I Matheson
Rahim Moineddin
Richard H Glazier
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Science, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2007 Mar-Apr;98(2):149-53
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Canada - epidemiology
Depression - epidemiology - ethnology
Emigration and Immigration - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Income - classification - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Small-Area Analysis
Socioeconomic Factors
Time Factors
Urban Health - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Immigrants tend to initially settle in urban centres. It is known that immigrants have lower rates of depression than the Canadian-born population, with the lowest rates among those who have arrived recently in Canada. It is established that women and low-income individuals are more likely to have depression. Given that recent immigration is a protective factor and female gender and low income are risk factors, the aim of this study was to explore a recent immigration-low income interaction by gender.
The study used 2000-01 Canadian Community Health Survey data. The sample consisted of 41,147 adults living in census metropolitan areas. Logistic regression was used to examine the effect of the interaction on depression.
The prevalence of depression in urban centres was 9.17% overall, 6.82% for men and 11.44% for women. The depression rate for recent immigrants was 5.24%, 3.87% for men and 6.64% for women. The depression rate among low-income individuals was 14.52%, 10.79% for men and 17.07% for women. The lowest-rate of depression was among low-income recent immigrant males (2.21%), whereas the highest rate was among low-income non-recent immigrant females (11.05%).
This study supports previous findings about the effects of income, immigration and gender on depression. The findings are novel in that they suggest a differential income effect for male and female recent immigrants. These findings have implications for public health planning, immigration and settlement services and policy development.
PubMed ID
17441541 View in PubMed
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How did Finland's economic recession in the early 1990s affect socio-economic equity in the use of hospital care?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186431
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2003 Apr;56(7):1517-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2003
Author
Ilmo Keskimäki
Author Affiliation
Academy of Finland, Helsinki, Finland. ilmo.keskimaki@stakes.fi
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2003 Apr;56(7):1517-30
Date
Apr-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Disease - classification
Female
Finland
Health Care Surveys
Health Expenditures - statistics & numerical data - trends
Health Services Accessibility - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends
Hospitals, General - economics - utilization
Humans
Income - classification - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
National Health Programs
Patient Admission - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends
Social Justice
Socioeconomic Factors
Surgical Procedures, Operative - classification - economics - utilization
Utilization Review - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The study evaluates the changes in socio-economic equity in the use of general hospital care in Finland from the late 1980s to the mid 1990s. In the early 1990s the Finnish economy plunged into a deep recession which slashed over 10% of GDP and resulted in a 12% decrease in national health expenditure. At the same time, the administration and financing of specialised health services were reformed. The impact on general hospital care was controversial: budgets were reduced but better productivity increased the supply of many services. According to the study, data, based on individual linkage of nationwide hospital registers to disposable family income data in population censuses, overall acute general hospital admission rates among Finns aged 25-74 increased by over 10% from 1988 to 1996. For some surgical procedures, such as cataract, coronary revascularisation and some orthopaedic operations, rates more than doubled. In both years, lower-income groups generally used hospital care more than the better-off. However, there was a slight shift towards a pro-rich distribution, mainly due to a larger increase in surgical care among the high-income groups. In 1988 the lowest income quintile used 8% and in 1996 15% fewer operations than the highest. For individual procedures and surgical diagnostic categories, the general trends of increasing disparities were similar. Despite cuts in expenditures in the early 1990s, the Finnish general hospital system based on public funding and provision managed to increase the supply of services. However, this increase coincided with widening socio-economic discrepancies in the use of surgical services. The paper proposes that these increasing inequities were due to certain features of the Finnish health care system which create social discrepancies in access to hospital care. These include the high profile of the private sector in specialised ambulatory care and in the supply of some elective procedures, and semi-private public hospital services requiring supplementary payments from patients.
PubMed ID
12614702 View in PubMed
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Income and health inequality across Canadian provinces.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79880
Source
Health Place. 2007 Sep;13(3):629-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
Safaei Jalil
Author Affiliation
Economics Program, University of Northern British Columbia, Prince George, BC, Canada V2N 4Z9. safaeij@unbc.ca
Source
Health Place. 2007 Sep;13(3):629-38
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Family Characteristics
Female
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Income - classification - statistics & numerical data
Male
Population Surveillance
Public Health Informatics
Sex Distribution
Social Class
Socioeconomic Factors
Sociology, Medical - economics
Abstract
This paper uses the aggregate data from the Public Use Microdata Files (PUMF) of Canadian National Population Health Survey to estimate income related health inequalities across the ten Canadian provinces. The unique features of the PUMF allow for a meaningful cross-provincial comparison of health indices and their measured inequalities. It concludes that health inequalities favouring the higher income people do exist in all provinces when health status is either self assessed or measured by the health utility index. Moreover, it finds considerable variations in measured health inequalities across the provinces with consistent rankings for certain provinces.
PubMed ID
17097328 View in PubMed
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Income inequality and health in Ontario: a multilevel analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174638
Source
Can J Public Health. 2005 May-Jun;96(3):206-11
Publication Type
Article
Author
Guoliang Xi
Ian McDowell
Rama Nair
Robert Spasoff
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON. gxi@uottawa.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2005 May-Jun;96(3):206-11
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Censuses
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health status
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Income - classification - statistics & numerical data
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Poverty
Social Class
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
To examine the association of income inequality at the public health unit level with individual health status in Ontario.
Cross-sectional multilevel study carried out among subjects aged 25 years or older residing in 42 public health units in Ontario. Individual-level data drawn from 30,939 respondents in 1996-97 Ontario Health Survey. Median area income and income inequality (Gini coefficient) calculated from 1996 census. Self-rated health status (SRH) and Health Utilities Index (HUI-3) scores were used as main outcomes.
Controlling for individual-level factors including income, respondents living in public health units in the highest tercile of income inequality had odds ratios of 1.20 (95% CI 1.04 - 1.38) for fair/poor self-rated health, and 1.11 (95% CI 1.01 - 1.22) for HUI score below the median, compared with people living in public health units in the lowest tercile. Controlling further for median area income had little effect on the association.
Income inequality was significantly associated with individual self-reported health status at public health unit level in Ontario, independent of individual income.
PubMed ID
15913087 View in PubMed
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Income inequality and mortality: time series evidence from Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183617
Source
Health Policy. 2003 Oct;66(1):107-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2003
Author
Audrey Laporte
Brian S Ferguson
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, 2nd Floor McMurrich Building, 12 Queen's Park Crescent West, Toronto, Ont., Canada M5S 1A8. audrey.laporte@utoronto.ca
Source
Health Policy. 2003 Oct;66(1):107-17
Date
Oct-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Income - classification - statistics & numerical data
Longitudinal Studies
Models, Statistical
Mortality - trends
National Health Programs - standards
Social Class
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
In this paper, we apply the standard model used in the income strand of the socio-economic status (SES)-population health literature to explain the relationship between mortality and income to pooled cross-section time-series data for Canada. The use of time-series data increases the available degrees of freedom and allows for the possibility that the effects of inequality take time to translate into poorer health outcomes. In light of recent criticisms of aggregate level studies, we do not attempt to differentiate between the absolute and relative inequality hypotheses, but test for the existence of a relationship between mortality and a measure of income inequality. We find that whether an exogenous trend is incorporated or an auto-regressive distributed lag form is used, the coefficients on mean income and the Gini are not significantly different from zero, which contradicts the findings in other parts of the literature, but which is consistent with earlier cross-section evidence for Canada. The results suggest that models that focus exclusively on income as a measure of the impact of SES on mortality are not complete and that health spending and unemployment may be even more important than income growth and dispersion.
PubMed ID
14499169 View in PubMed
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Income inequality, household income, and health status in Canada: a prospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184215
Source
Am J Public Health. 2003 Aug;93(8):1287-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2003
Author
Christopher B McLeod
John N Lavis
Cameron A Mustard
Greg L Stoddart
Author Affiliation
Institute for Work and Health, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. cmcleod@iwh.on.ca
Source
Am J Public Health. 2003 Aug;93(8):1287-93
Date
Aug-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Censuses
Cohort Studies
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Family Characteristics
Health status
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Income - classification - statistics & numerical data
Linear Models
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Self Disclosure
Social Support
Socioeconomic Factors
Urban Health - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
This study sought to determine whether income inequality, household income, and their interaction are associated with health status.
Income inequality and area income measures were linked to data on household income and individual characteristics from the 1994 Canadian National Population Health Survey and to data on self-reported health status from the 1994, 1996, and 1998 survey waves.
Income inequality was not associated with health status. Low household income was consistently associated with poor health. The combination of low household income and residence in a metropolitan area with less income inequality was associated with poorer health status than was residence in an area with more income inequality.
Household income, but not income inequality, appears to explain some of the differences in health status among Canadians.
Notes
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PubMed ID
12893616 View in PubMed
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18 records – page 1 of 2.