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1547 records – page 1 of 155.

[CONTRIBUTION TO CARE OF CHILDREN UNDER 16 YEARS.]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45237
Source
Sven Lakartidn. 1964 Dec 2;61:3836-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2-1964
Author
E. JONSSON
Source
Sven Lakartidn. 1964 Dec 2;61:3836-8
Date
Dec-2-1964
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Disabled Persons
Income Tax
Sweden
PubMed ID
14276468 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
AARN News Lett. 1987 Sep;43(8):31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1987
Author
L. Smith
Source
AARN News Lett. 1987 Sep;43(8):31
Date
Sep-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Economics, Nursing
Humans
Income
Retirement
PubMed ID
3661089 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Deductions by assessment of expenses for dental care].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature246606
Source
Nor Tannlaegeforen Tid. 1979 Dec;89(11):628-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1979
Author
K S Kjølstad
Source
Nor Tannlaegeforen Tid. 1979 Dec;89(11):628-9
Date
Dec-1979
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Dental Care - economics
Humans
Income Tax
Norway
PubMed ID
293638 View in PubMed
Less detail

Inequity in access to cancer care: a review of the Canadian literature.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137990
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2011 Mar;22(3):359-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
André R Maddison
Yukiko Asada
Robin Urquhart
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, Dalhousie University, 5849 University Ave, Mailbox No. 257, Halifax, NS B3H 4H7, Canada. andre.maddison@dal.ca
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2011 Mar;22(3):359-66
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Demography
Healthcare Disparities
Humans
Income
Neoplasms - therapy
Abstract
Despite the policy and research attention on ensuring equitable access--equal access for equal need--to health care, research continues to identify inequities in access to cancer services. We conducted a literature review to identify the current state of knowledge about inequity in access to cancer health services in Canada in terms of the continuum of care, disease sites, and dimensions of inequity (e.g., income). We searched MEDLINE, CINAHL, and Embase for studies published between 1990 and 2009. We retrieved 51 studies, which examine inequity in access to cancer services from screening to end-of-life care, for multiple cancer types, and a variety of socioeconomic, geographic, and demographic factors that may cause concern for inequity in Canada. This review demonstrates that income has the most consistent influence on inequity in access to screening, while age and geography are most influential for treatment services and end-of-life care, even after adjusting for patient need. Our review also reports on methods used in the literature and new techniques to explore. Equitable access to cancer care is vitally important in all health systems. Obtaining information on the current status of inequities in access to cancer care is a critical first step toward action.
PubMed ID
21221758 View in PubMed
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[Wife's income allowance only until children are 10-12 years old]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature41710
Source
Vardfacket. 1978 Mar 16;2(5):70-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-16-1978
Author
O. Sundström
Source
Vardfacket. 1978 Mar 16;2(5):70-1
Date
Mar-16-1978
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Female
Humans
Income Tax
Public Assistance
Sweden
PubMed ID
246674 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Dimens Health Serv. 1977 Sep;54(9):4-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1977
Author
B L Brosseau
Source
Dimens Health Serv. 1977 Sep;54(9):4-5
Date
Sep-1977
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Health Services - economics - utilization
Humans
Income
Physicians
PubMed ID
902935 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
CMAJ. 1994 May 15;150(10):1539-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-15-1994
Author
B D Perry-Whittingham
Source
CMAJ. 1994 May 15;150(10):1539-40
Date
May-15-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Humans
Income
Physicians, Family - economics
Primary Prevention
Notes
Comment On: CMAJ. 1993 Dec 15;149(12):1795-8008261349
PubMed ID
8174018 View in PubMed
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Commentary: Income and health: why are curves so appealing?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191720
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2001 Dec;30(6):1405-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2001
Author
G. Der
Author Affiliation
MRC Social & Public Health Sciences Unit, University of Glasgow, 4 Lilybank Gardens, Glasgow G12 8RZ, Scotland.
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2001 Dec;30(6):1405-6
Date
Dec-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Finland - epidemiology
Health status
Humans
Income
Mortality - trends
Notes
Comment On: Int J Epidemiol. 2001 Dec;30(6):1397-40511821353
PubMed ID
11821354 View in PubMed
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[The Attorney General--There is no legal authority for Medical Statute 67-1970 and it is contradictory to the intentions of LSPV].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108987
Source
Lakartidningen. 1971 Mar 3;68(10):1050-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-3-1971
Source
Lakartidningen. 1971 Mar 3;68(10):1050-1
Date
Mar-3-1971
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Forensic Psychiatry
Hospitalization
Hospitals, Psychiatric
Humans
Income
Sweden
PubMed ID
5573783 View in PubMed
Less detail

Income-related health inequality in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199611
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2000 Mar;50(5):663-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2000
Author
K H Humphries
E. van Doorslaer
Author Affiliation
Netherlands Institute for Health Sciences, Erasmus University, Rotterdam.
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2000 Mar;50(5):663-71
Date
Mar-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Health status
Humans
Income - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
This study uses data from the 1994 National Population Health Survey and applies the methods developed by Wagstaff and van Doorslaer (1994, measuring inequalities in health in the presence of multiple-category morbidity indicators. Health Economics 3, 281-291) to measure the degree of income-related inequality in self-reported health in Canada by means of concentration indices. It finds that significant inequalities in self-reported ill-health exist and favour the higher income groups--the higher the level of income, the better the level of self-assessed health. The analysis also indicates that lower income individuals are somewhat more likely to report their self-assessed health as poor or less-than-good than higher income groups, at the same level of a more 'objective' health indictor such as the McMaster Health Utility Index. The degree of inequality in 'subjective' health is slightly higher than in 'objective' health, but not significantly different. The degree of inequality in self-assessed health in Canada was found to be significantly higher than that reported by van Doorslaer et al. (1997, income related inequalities in health: some international comparisons, Journal of Health Economics 16, 93-112) for seven European countries, but not significantly different from the health inequality measured for the UK or the US. It also appears as if Canada's health inequality is higher than what would be expected on the basis of its income inequality.
PubMed ID
10658847 View in PubMed
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1547 records – page 1 of 155.