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Acceptability of dental appearance in a group of Finnish 16- to 25-year-olds.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151199
Source
Angle Orthod. 2009 May;79(3):479-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
Anna-Liisa Svedström-Oristo
Terttu Pietilä
Ilpo Pietilä
Tero Vahlberg
Pentti Alanen
Juha Varrela
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Development and Orthodontics, Institute of Dentistry, University of Turku, Lemminkäisenkatu 2, 20520 Turku, Finland. anlisve@utu.fi
Source
Angle Orthod. 2009 May;79(3):479-83
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Area Under Curve
Diastema - pathology
Esthetics, Dental
Female
Finland
Humans
Incisor - pathology
Male
Malocclusion - classification - psychology
Needs Assessment
Orthodontics, Corrective - psychology
Personal Satisfaction
ROC Curve
Self Concept
Sex Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
To define a grade in the Aesthetic Component (AC) of the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (IOTN) that would differentiate between esthetically acceptable and unacceptable occlusions and that would also be both subjectively and objectively meaningful.
Dental appearance and self-perceived orthodontic treatment need were analyzed in a group of Finnish young adults (171 males, 263 females, age range 16-25 years). Subjective data were gathered using a questionnaire, and the respondents were requested to score their dental appearance on a visual analog type 10-grade scale. Professional assessment of dental appearance was performed by two orthodontists using the AC of the IOTN. The cutoff value between esthetically acceptable and unacceptable occlusions was defined using receiver operating characteristic curves.
Sixty-six percent of orthodontically treated and 74% of the untreated respondents were satisfied with their own dental appearance. Every third respondent reported one or more disturbing traits in their dentition. The most frequently expressed reason for dissatisfaction was crowding; girls expressed dissatisfaction more often than boys did (P = .005). A self-perceived treatment need was reported infrequently by 8% of orthodontically treated and 6% of untreated respondents. In the logistic regression analysis, self-perceived need for orthodontic treatment was the only significant factor explaining dissatisfaction with own dental esthetics. On the applied scales, grades 1 and 2 fulfilled the criteria for satisfactory dental esthetics.
The results suggest that the AC grade 3 could serve as a cutoff value between esthetically acceptable and unacceptable occlusions.
PubMed ID
19413382 View in PubMed
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Aetiology of severe demarcated enamel opacities--an evaluation based on prospective medical and social data from 17,000 children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101274
Source
Swed Dent J. 2011;35(2):57-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Tobias G Fagrell
Johnny Ludvigsson
Christer Ullbro
Sven-Ake Lundin
Göran Koch
Author Affiliation
Paediatric Dentistry, Special Dental Services, Sahlgrenska University Hospital Mölndal, Sweden.
Source
Swed Dent J. 2011;35(2):57-67
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Feeding
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Dental Enamel - drug effects - pathology
Dental Enamel Hypoplasia - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Female
Humans
Incisor - pathology
Infant
Molar - pathology
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
During the 1970s dentists reported an increasing prevalence of a "new" type of enamel disturbance.The disturbance was very specific, with areas of demarcated hypomineralised enamel, and was mostly found in permanent first molars and incisors. Several studies have tried to reveal the aetiology behind the enamel disturbance but sofar no clear factors correlated have been found. The aim of the present study was to evaluate aetiological factors to severe demarcated opacities (SDO) in first permanent molars in a large cohort of children enrolled in the "All Babies in Southeast Sweden" (ABIS) project. ABIS is a prospective study of all children in five Swedish counties born between Oct 1, 1997 and Oct 1, 1999, in all about 17,000 children.They have been followed from birth with recording of a large number of factors on nutrition, diseases, medication, infections, social situation etc. With help from 89 Public Dental Service clinics in the same area preliminary examinations of the children, born between Oct 1,1997 and Oct 1,1999, reported 595 children with severe demarcated opacities (SDO) in first molars.These children and a randomly selected age matched group of 1,200 children were further invited to be examined by specialists in paediatric dentistry. At these examinations 224 severe cases were identified as well as 253 children completely without enamel disturbances among children registered in ABIS.These two groups were analysed according to any correlation between SDO and variables in the ABIS databank. The analyses showed no association between SDO and pre-, peri-, and neonatal data. However, we found a positive association between SDO and breastfeeding for more than 6 months (OR 1.9; 95% CI 1.1-3.2), late introduction of gruel (OR 1.9; 95% CI 1.1-2.9), and late introduction of infant formula (OR 1.8; 95% CI 1.2-2.9). A combination of these three variables increased the risk to develop SDO by more than five times (OR 5.1; 95% CI 1.6-15.7). No significant associations were found to other environmental, developmental, or medical factors. We conclude that nutritional conditions during first 6 months of life may influence the risk to develop severe demarcated opacities in first permanent molars.
PubMed ID
21827015 View in PubMed
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Applying modern survival analysis methods to longitudinal dental caries studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191663
Source
J Dent Res. 2002 Feb;81(2):144-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2002
Author
T. Härkäne
M A Larmas
J I Virtanen
E. Arjas
Author Affiliation
Rolf Nevanlinna Institute, University of Helsinki, Finland. Tommi.Harkanen@RNI.helsinki.fi
Source
J Dent Res. 2002 Feb;81(2):144-8
Date
Feb-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Algorithms
Bayes Theorem
Child
Cohort Studies
DMF Index
Dental Caries - etiology
Dental Caries Susceptibility
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incisor - pathology
Male
Molar - pathology
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Survival Analysis
Tooth - pathology
Tooth Eruption
Abstract
Before the 1960s, tooth-specific caries risk was reported to be highest at 2 to 4 years after eruption. We studied the tooth-specific caries risk in three contemporary age cohorts in Finland. All together, 4072 boys and girls were followed annually from age 6 to age 18+ years in three age cohorts born in the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s. We used a survival model and Bayesian inferential methods in the statistical analyses to establish the secular changes during this period. The analysis was based on the caries risk in individual teeth as a function of tooth age instead of summary measures, such as DMFS values. Our first finding was a marked overall decrease of caries. Moreover, analyses of the 1960 and 1970 cohorts revealed that the risk in molar teeth was highest immediately after eruption; in the youngest cohort, however, the risks of individual teeth were so low that no such dependencies on tooth age could be established.
PubMed ID
11827260 View in PubMed
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Articulatory disorders in speech as related to the position of the incisors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature238153
Source
Eur J Orthod. 1985 Nov;7(4):260-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1985

Asymmetric crying facies with a couple of primary mandibular central incisor and 22q11 deletion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100417
Source
J Clin Pediatr Dent. 2010;34(4):343-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Belma Saygili Karagol
Aysegul Zenciroglu
Author Affiliation
Sami Ulus Maternity and Children's Education and Research Hospital, Division of Neonatology, Ankara, Turkey. belmakaragol@yahoo.com
Source
J Clin Pediatr Dent. 2010;34(4):343-5
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Crying - physiology
DiGeorge Syndrome - congenital
Diagnosis, Differential
Facial Asymmetry - congenital
Facial Nerve Diseases - diagnosis
Facial Paralysis - diagnosis
Facies
Female
Humans
Incisor - pathology
Infant, Newborn
Natal Teeth - pathology
Abstract
Facial asymmetry present only on crying has been described as a separate entity and termed asymmetric crying facies. The cause of the facial asymmetry in this disorder is congenital absence or hypoplasia of the depressor anguli oris muscle at the corner of the mouth. This defect is associated at times with major congenital anomalies, most commonly in the cardiovascular system. Chromosome 22q11 microdeletions in cases with ACF have been reported. We report a newborn infant who had ACF associated with a couple of primary mandibular central incisor teeth and chromosome 22q11 microdeletion. This clinical sign in association with ACF has not been previously described.
PubMed ID
20831138 View in PubMed
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Bond failure and decalcification: A comparison of a cyanoacrylate and a composite resin bonding system in vivo.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30893
Source
Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop. 2003 Jun;123(6):624-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2003
Author
Phu T Le
Martin Weinstein
Alan J Borislow
Leonard E Braitman
Author Affiliation
Maxwell S. Fogel Department of Dental Medicine, Albert Einstein Medical Center, Phialdelphia, PA 19141-3098, USA.
Source
Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop. 2003 Jun;123(6):624-7
Date
Jun-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Comparative Study
Composite Resins - chemistry
Confidence Intervals
Cyanoacrylates - chemistry
Dental Bonding
Dental Cements - chemistry
Dental Enamel - pathology
Equipment Failure
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incisor - pathology
Male
Matched-Pair Analysis
Orthodontic Brackets
Prospective Studies
Resin Cements - chemistry
Tooth Demineralization - etiology
Abstract
This prospective, in vivo study compared bond failure and enamel decalcification with a cyanoacrylate bracket bonding system (SmartBond, Gestenco International, Gothenburg, Sweden) and a traditional light-cured composite system (Light Bond, Reliance Orthodontic Products, Itasca, Ill). A total of 327 teeth were evaluated after a period of 12 to 14 months; 163 experimental teeth were bonded with the cyanoacrylate bonding system, and 164 control teeth were bonded with the light-cured composite resin. All teeth were evaluated for breakage (bond failure). The average percentage of bracket failures with cyanoacrylate was 55.6% compared with 11.3% with composite resin (P
PubMed ID
12806340 View in PubMed
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Caries increment in primary teeth from 3 to 6 years of age: a longitudinal study in Swedish children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277766
Source
Eur Arch Paediatr Dent. 2014 Jun;15(3):167-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
A-C André Kramer
M S Skeie
A B Skaare
I. Espelid
A-L Ostberg
Source
Eur Arch Paediatr Dent. 2014 Jun;15(3):167-73
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Cuspid - pathology
DMF Index
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Dental Enamel - pathology
Dentin - pathology
Disease Progression
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incisor - pathology
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Molar - pathology
Prevalence
Sweden - epidemiology
Tooth Crown - pathology
Tooth, Deciduous - pathology
Abstract
To longitudinally follow and analyse caries prevalence and development in primary dentition in Swedish preschool children from 3 to 6 years of age.
A longitudinal clinical study.
Three hundred 3-year-old children in the Public Dental Service were consecutively included. The children underwent annual clinical examinations at 3, 4, 5 and 6 years of age, performed by four calibrated dentists in clinical settings. Initial (d1-2) and manifest (d3-5) lesions were registered at surface and tooth level. Radiographs were taken when indicated and possible.
Chi-squared test was used for group comparisons. Friedman's test, Wilcoxon non-parametric test and logistic regression analyses explored caries development over the years.
The parents of 271 children agreed to their children participating in the study (total dropout rate at 6 years, 10.3%). At baseline, 27.3% of the children had carious lesions (d1-5 mean 0.98, SD ± 2.44), and only 50.6% of the children were totally caries-free at 6 years (d1-5 mean 1.88, SD ± 2.81). Initial carious lesions made up the greater share at all ages. The greater part of the caries increment occurred between 3 and 4 years of age (p
PubMed ID
24008371 View in PubMed
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Caries prevalence in the Nordic countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35719
Source
Int Dent J. 1994 Aug;44(4 Suppl 1):371-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1994
Author
F R von der Fehr
Author Affiliation
Dental Faculty, University of Oslo, Norway.
Source
Int Dent J. 1994 Aug;44(4 Suppl 1):371-8
Date
Aug-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child Health Services
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
DMF Index
Denmark - epidemiology
Dental Caries - epidemiology - pathology - prevention & control
Dental Fissures - epidemiology
Dental Health Services
Finland - epidemiology
Fluoridation
Fluorides - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Incisor - pathology
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Public Health Dentistry
Sweden - epidemiology
Tooth - pathology
Abstract
Despite differences in the dental health care services and the recording and reporting systems, a consistent and similar decline in dental caries is evident for Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden during the last two decades. Iceland has experienced a later onset but a steeper decline in dental caries than the other Nordic countries. Public reports demonstrate that in 1991/92 23-49 per cent of the 12-year-old children were caries-free and the mean tooth prevalence was 1.2-2.5 DMFT. Fluoride in various forms has been instrumental in these changes, and public dental health programmes appear to have played an important role, at least in the initiation of the decline. Caries has been slowed down and delayed, but has not been eradicated.
PubMed ID
7814104 View in PubMed
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Changes in dental fluorosis following the cessation of water fluoridation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169430
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 2006 Jun;34(3):197-204
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2006
Author
D Christopher Clark
Jay D Shulman
Gerardo Maupomé
Steven M Levy
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Health Sciences, Faculty of Dentistry, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada. dcclark@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 2006 Jun;34(3):197-204
Date
Jun-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
British Columbia - epidemiology
Cariostatic Agents - therapeutic use
Child
Cuspid - pathology
Dental Records
Dentifrices - therapeutic use
Epidemiologic Studies
Esthetics, Dental
Fluoridation - statistics & numerical data
Fluorides - therapeutic use
Fluorosis, Dental - classification - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incisor - pathology
Prevalence
Residence Characteristics
Social Class
Toothbrushing - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To determine changes in the prevalence of dental fluorosis, and in perceptions of aesthetic concerns due to dental fluorosis after water fluoridation ceased.
Schoolchildren in second and third grades were examined in 1993-94, 1996-97 and 2002-03 to determine changes in the prevalence of dental fluorosis following fluoridation cessation of the public water supplies in 1992. The Thylstrup-Fejerskov Index (TFI) was used to quantify dental fluorosis. Perceptions of aesthetics were assessed by questionnaires which were sent home to parents. Residence and dental histories were confirmed on all children to determine the extent of exposure to all types of fluorides. Comparisons between the three surveys were used to establish the influence of fluoridated water and other fluoride sources on the occurrence and severity of dental fluorosis. Aesthetic ratings from parents were used to assess the aesthetic conditions of maxillary anterior teeth across the three surveys.
When fluoride was removed from the water supply in 1992, the prevalence and severity of TFI scores decreased significantly from the 1993-94 survey cycle when compared with the 1996-97 and 2002-03 survey cycles. The use of fluoride supplements and fluoride dentifrice also decreased during this study period. Analyses were unable to determine the influence of these different fluoride exposures on the changes in TFI scores over time. Comparisons of aesthetic ratings from parents between survey cycles failed to show any significant differences.
PubMed ID
16674751 View in PubMed
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A comparative study of sagittal correction with the Herbst appliance in two different ethnic groups.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34311
Source
Eur J Orthod. 1997 Apr;19(2):195-204
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1997
Author
G W Wong
L L So
U. Hägg
Author Affiliation
Department of Children's Dentistry and Orthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong.
Source
Eur J Orthod. 1997 Apr;19(2):195-204
Date
Apr-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
Case-Control Studies
Cephalometry
China - ethnology
Comparative Study
Dental Occlusion, Centric
Ethnic Groups
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Hong Kong
Humans
Incisor - pathology
Male
Malocclusion, Angle Class II - pathology - therapy
Mandible - pathology
Maxilla - pathology
Molar - pathology
Orthodontic Appliances, Functional
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
The dentofacial morphology of Chinese is different from Caucasians. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the skeletal and dental changes contributing to the sagittal correction in group of consecutive Chinese children who were treated with the Herbst appliance. A comparison was made between 14 Chinese and 14 Swedish subjects who all had Herbst appliance treatment. All subjects were corrected from the Class II division 1 malocclusion to an overcorrected Class I or Class III dental relationship within a 6-8 month period. Lateral cephalograms taken before and immediately after the Herbst treatment were analysed. In general, the skeletal and dental changes during treatment were comparable between both ethnic groups. However, individual variations within the two groups were wide. It can be concluded that the Herbst appliance was equally successful in Southern Chinese children and similar treatment changes as those achieved in Swedish children could be found.
PubMed ID
9183069 View in PubMed
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37 records – page 1 of 4.