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Assessment of mobility and bioavailability of contaminants in MSW incineration ash with aquatic and terrestrial bioassays.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263258
Source
Waste Manag. 2014 Oct;34(10):1871-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
V. Ribé
E. Nehrenheim
M. Odlare
Source
Waste Manag. 2014 Oct;34(10):1871-6
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aliivibrio fischeri - drug effects
Animals
Biological Availability
Coal Ash - pharmacokinetics - toxicity
Construction Materials - toxicity
Daphnia - drug effects
European Union
Germination
Incineration
Refuse Disposal - legislation & jurisprudence
Solid Waste - analysis
Sweden
Trifolium - drug effects - growth & development
Abstract
Incineration of municipal solid waste (MSW) is a waste treatment method which can be sustainable in terms of waste volume reduction as well as a source of renewable energy. In the process fly and bottom ash is generated as a waste material. The ash residue may vary greatly in composition depending on the type of waste incinerated and it can contain elevated levels of harmful contaminants such as heavy metals. In this study, the ecotoxicity of a weathered, untreated incineration bottom ash was characterized as defined by the H14 criterion of the EU Waste Framework Directive by means of an elemental analysis, leaching tests followed by a chemical analysis and a combination of aquatic and solid-phase bioassays. The experiments were conducted to assess the mobility and bioavailability of ash contaminants. A combination of aquatic and terrestrial bioassays was used to determine potentially adverse acute effects of exposure to the solid ash and aqueous ash leachates. The results from the study showed that the bottom ash from a municipal waste incineration plant in mid-Sweden contained levels of metals such as Cu, Pb and Zn, which exceeded the Swedish EPA limit values for inert wastes. The chemical analysis of the ash leachates showed high concentrations of particularly Cr. The leachate concentration of Cr exceeded the limit value for L/S 10 leaching for inert wastes. Filtration of leachates prior to analysis may have underestimated the leachability of complex-forming metals such as Cu and Pb. The germination test of solid ash and ash leachates using T. repens showed a higher inhibition of seedling emergence of seeds exposed to the solid ash than the seeds exposed to ash leachates. This indicated a relatively low mobility of toxicants from the solid ash into the leachates, although some metals exceeded the L/S 10 leaching limit values for inert wastes. The Microtox® toxicity test showed only a very low toxic response to the ash leachate exposure, while the D. magna immobility test showed a moderately high toxic effect of the ash leachates. Overall, the results from this study showed an ecotoxic effect of the solid MSW bottom ash and the corresponding ash leachates. The material may therefore pose an environmental risk if used in construction applications. However, as the testing of the solid ash was rather limited and the ash leachate showed an unusually high leaching of Cr, further assessments are required in order to conclusively characterize the bottom ash studied herein as hazardous according to the H14 criterion.
PubMed ID
24502934 View in PubMed
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Atmospheric emissions, depositions, and transformations of arsenic in natural ecosystem in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184965
Source
ScientificWorldJournal. 2002 Jun 20;2:1667-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-20-2002
Author
Arun B Mukherjee
Prosun Bhattacharya
Author Affiliation
Department of Limnology and Environmental Protection, P.O. Box 62, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland. arun.mukherjee@helsinki.fi
Source
ScientificWorldJournal. 2002 Jun 20;2:1667-75
Date
Jun-20-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - chemistry - metabolism
Arsenic - chemistry - metabolism
Atmosphere - analysis - chemistry
Ecosystem
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Finland
Fossil Fuels
Humans
Incineration
Industrial Waste
Metallurgy - trends
Power Plants - trends
Water Pollutants, Chemical - metabolism
Water Supply - analysis
Abstract
For the last 2 decades, special attention has been paid to arsenic due to its high concentration in groundwater in many regions of the globe. There are not very many reports on arsenic concentration in the Finnish ecosystem, although the metal has been known to be highly toxic since ancient times. For the majority of people in Finland, the leading exposure route to arsenic is through food consumption. In this study, it has been observed that atmospheric emissions of arsenic from anthropogenic sources have decreased by 90%, which is due to better control technology and strict regulation. Aquatic discharge also was attenuated from 7.1 metric tons (t) in 1990 to 0.7 t in 1999. The concentration of arsenic aerosols in the atmosphere in Finland varies between 0.46 to 0.75 ng m(-3). Its use in pesticides and insecticides also has been phased out in Finland. There is no information available regarding arsenic species in the Finnish environment. Elevated concentrations of arsenic in groundwater has been reported for many countries. In Finland two hot spots are reported--one in the south of Finland and the second in Lapland. In these areas, arsenic concentration in well water is greater than 10 microg l(-1) (WHO recommended value:
PubMed ID
12806160 View in PubMed
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Bio fuel ash in a road construction: impact on soil solution chemistry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature83194
Source
Waste Manag. 2006;26(6):599-613
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Thurdin R T
van Hees P A W
Bylund D.
Lundström U S
Author Affiliation
Department of Natural Sciences, Mid Sweden University, SE-851 70 Sundsvall, Sweden. rikard.thurdin@swepro.se
Source
Waste Manag. 2006;26(6):599-613
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anions - analysis
Calcium - analysis
Cations - analysis
Construction Materials
Environmental monitoring
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Incineration
Metals, Heavy - analysis
Organic Chemicals - analysis
Refuse Disposal - methods
Soil Pollutants - analysis
Sweden
Waste Management - methods
Abstract
Limited natural resources and landfill space, as well as increasing amounts of ash produced from incineration of bio fuel and municipal solid waste, have created a demand for useful applications of ash, of which road construction is one application. Along national road 90, situated about 20 km west of Sollefteå in the middle of Sweden, an experiment road was constructed with a 40 cm bio fuel ash layer. The environmental impact of the ash layer was evaluated from soil solutions obtained by centrifugation of soil samples taken on four occasions during 2001-2003. Soil samples were taken in the ash layer, below the ash layer at two depths in the road and in the ditch. In the soil solutions, pH, conductivity, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and the total concentration of cations (metals) and anions were determined. Two years after the application of the ash layers in the test road, the concentrations in the ash layer of K, SO4, Zn, and Hg had increased significantly while the concentration of Se, Mo and Cd had decreased significantly. Below the ash layer in the road an initial increase of pH was observed and the concentrations of K, SO4, Se, Mo and Cd increased significantly, while the concentrations of Cu and Hg decreased significantly in the road and also in the ditch. Cd was the element showing a potential risk of contamination of the groundwater. The concentrations of Ca in the ash layer indicated an ongoing hardening, which is important for the leaching rate and the strength of the road construction.
PubMed ID
16213132 View in PubMed
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Carbon footprint and energy use of food waste management options for fresh fruit and vegetables from supermarkets.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283955
Source
Waste Manag. 2017 Feb;60:786-799
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2017
Author
Mattias Eriksson
Johanna Spångberg
Source
Waste Manag. 2017 Feb;60:786-799
Date
Feb-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Carbon Footprint
Food
Fruit
Greenhouse Effect
Incineration
Sweden
Vegetables
Waste Management - methods
Abstract
Food waste is a problem with economic, environmental and social implications, making it both important and complex. Previous studies have addressed food waste management options at the less prioritised end of the waste hierarchy, but information on more prioritised levels is also needed when selecting the best available waste management options. Investigating the global warming potential and primary energy use of different waste management options offers a limited perspective, but is still important for validating impacts from the waste hierarchy in a local context. This study compared the effect on greenhouse gas emissions and primary energy use of different food waste management scenarios in the city of Växjö, Sweden. A life cycle assessment was performed for four waste management scenarios (incineration, anaerobic digestion, conversion and donation), using five food products (bananas, tomatoes, apples, oranges and sweet peppers) from the fresh fruit and vegetables department in two supermarkets as examples when treated as individual waste streams. For all five waste streams, the established waste hierarchy was a useful tool for prioritising the various options, since the re-use options (conversion and donation) reduced the greenhouse gas emissions and the primary energy use to a significantly higher degree than the energy recovery options (incineration and anaerobic digestion). The substitution of other products and services had a major impact on the results in all scenarios. Re-use scenarios where food was replaced therefore had much higher potential to reduce environmental impact than the energy recovery scenarios where fossil fuel was replaced. This is due to the high level of resources needed to produce food compared with production of fossil fuels, but also to fresh fruit and vegetables having a high water content, making them inefficient as energy carriers. Waste valorisation measures should therefore focus on directing each type of food to the waste management system that can substitute the most resource-demanding products or services, even when the whole waste flow cannot be treated with the same method.
PubMed ID
28089203 View in PubMed
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Comparison of the organic waste management systems in the Danish-German border region using life cycle assessment (LCA).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278341
Source
Waste Manag. 2016 Mar;49:491-504
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2016
Author
Morten Bang Jensen
Jacob Møller
Charlotte Scheutz
Source
Waste Manag. 2016 Mar;49:491-504
Date
Mar-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anaerobiosis
Bioreactors
Denmark
Germany
Incineration
Refuse Disposal - standards
Solid Waste - analysis
Waste Management - methods
Abstract
This study assessed the management of the organic household waste in the Danish-German border region and points out major differences between the systems and their potential effects on the environment using life cycle assessment (LCA). The treatment of organic waste from households in the Danish-German border region is very different on each side of the border; the Danish region only uses incineration for the treatment of organic household waste while the German region includes combined biogas production and composting, mechanical and biological treatment (MBT) and incineration. Data on all parts of the organic waste treatment was collected including waste composition data and data from treatment facilities and their respective energy systems. Based on that the organic waste management systems in the border region were modelled using the EASETECH waste management LCA-model. The main output is a life cycle assessment showing large differences in the environmental performance of the two different regions with the Danish region performing better in 10 out of 14 impact categories. Furthermore, the importance of the substituted district heating systems was investigated showing an impact up to 34% of the entire system for one impact category and showing large difference between each heating system substituted, e.g. in "Global Warming" the impact was from -16 to -1.1 milli person equivalent/tonne treated waste from substitution of centralised hard coal and decentralised natural gas, respectively.
PubMed ID
26856446 View in PubMed
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Controlling the mobility of chromium and molybdenum in MSWI fly ash in a washing process.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294294
Source
Waste Manag. 2018 Jun; 76:727-733
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2018
Author
Désirée Nordmark
Anders Lagerkvist
Author Affiliation
Division of Waste Science & Technology, Luleå University of Technology, SE-971 87 Luleå, Sweden. Electronic address: desiree.nordmark@ltu.se.
Source
Waste Manag. 2018 Jun; 76:727-733
Date
Jun-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Carbon
Chromium - chemistry
Coal Ash - chemistry
Incineration
Metals, Heavy
Molybdenum - chemistry
Particulate Matter
Sweden
Abstract
Fly ash from a cogeneration plant near Sundsvall in Sweden was treated in an ash-washing facility. The leaching of chromium (Cr) and molybdenum (Mo) from the ash residue exceeded the limit values for non-hazardous landfills. In this study factors that influence the leaching of Cr and Mo were identified and methods that can reduce the leaching were evaluated. The results revealed that the mobility of Cr and Mo are mainly controlled by pH and redox reactions and sequential extraction tests also showed that the fraction of highly soluble species of Cr and Mo increased after washing due to pH reactions in the ash during the process. Stabilization of the pH at ~8 through carbonation of the washed ash and a lowering of the redox potential by adding ferrous iron to the process resulted in decreased leaching. Treatment with carbon dioxide yielded a decrease (from 10.7 to 8.2) in the pH and, hence, the leaching of Cr and Mo by 93 and 91%, respectively. And the addition of ferrous iron reduced the leaching of Cr by 50%. Carbonation of the ash can be achieved via treatment with flue gases from the power plant or treatment with landfill gas at the disposal site.
PubMed ID
29551230 View in PubMed
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A decision support tool for selecting the optimal sewage sludge treatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290665
Source
Chemosphere. 2018 Feb; 193:521-529
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-2018
Author
Ville Turunen
Jaana Sorvari
Anna Mikola
Author Affiliation
Aalto University, School of Engineering, P.O. Box 15200, 00076 Aalto, Finland. Electronic address: ville.j.turunen@aalto.fi.
Source
Chemosphere. 2018 Feb; 193:521-529
Date
Feb-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Agriculture
Decision Support Techniques
Finland
Incineration
Recycling
Sewage - statistics & numerical data
Waste Disposal, Fluid - methods - statistics & numerical data
Waste Water - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Sewage sludge contains significant amounts of resources, such as nutrients and organic matter. At the same time, the organic contaminants (OC) found in sewage sludge are of growing concern. Consequently, in many European countries incineration is currently favored over recycling in agriculture. This study presents a Multi-Attribute Value Theory (MAVT)-based decision support tool (DST) for facilitating sludge treatment decisions. Essential decision criteria were recognized and prioritized, i.e., weighted, by experts from water utilities. Since the fate of organic contaminants was in focus, a simple scoring method was developed to take into account their environmental risks. The final DST assigns each sludge treatment method a preference score expressing its superiority compared to alternative methods. The DST was validated by testing it with data from two Finnish municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTP). The validation results of the first case study preferred sludge pyrolysis (preference score: 0.629) to other alternatives: composting and incineration (score 0.580, and 0.484 respectively). The preference scores were influenced by WWTP dependent factors, i.e., the operating environment and the weighting of the criteria. A lack of data emerged as the main practical limitation. Therefore, not all of the relevant criteria could be included in the value tree. More data are needed on the effects of treatment methods on the availability of nutrients, the quality of organic matter and sludge-borne OCs. Despite these shortcomings, the DST proved useful and adaptable in decision-making. It can also help achieve a more transparent, understandable and comprehensive decision-making process.
PubMed ID
29169127 View in PubMed
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Demobilisation of critical contaminants in four typical waste-to-energy ashes by carbonation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82938
Source
Waste Manag. 2006;26(4):430-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Todorovic Jelena
Ecke Holger
Author Affiliation
The Division of Waste Science and Technology, Luleå University of Technology, S-971 87 Luleå, Sweden.
Source
Waste Manag. 2006;26(4):430-41
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollution - prevention & control
Carbon - analysis - chemistry
Carbon Dioxide - chemistry
Chlorides - analysis - chemistry
Conservation of Natural Resources
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Incineration
Industrial Waste - analysis
Metals, Heavy - analysis - chemistry
Particulate Matter
Sulfates - analysis - chemistry
Sweden
Waste Management - methods
Abstract
Two bottom ashes, one air pollution control (APC) residue and one fly ash from three different Swedish municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) plants were characterised regarding the leaching of environmentally relevant components. Characterisation was performed using a diffusion tank leaching test. The impact of carbonation on the release of eight critical components, i.e., Cl(-), Cr, Cu, Mo, Pb, Sb, Se, SO(4)(2-) and Zn, was assessed at a lab-scale and showed carbonation to have a more pronounced demobilising effect on critical components in bottom ashes than in APC residue and fly ash. From grate type incinerator bottom ash, the release of Cr decreased by 97%, by 63% for Cu and by 45% for Sb. In the investigated APC residue, the releases of Cr, Se and Pb were defined as critical, although they either remained unaffected or increased after carbonation. Cl(-) and SO(4)(2-) remained mobile after carbonation in all investigated residues.
PubMed ID
16403618 View in PubMed
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Dioxin emissions after installation of a polishing wet scrubber in a hazardous waste incineration facility.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature83238
Source
Chemosphere. 2005 Oct;61(3):405-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2005
Author
Löthgren Carl-Johan
van Bavel Bert
Author Affiliation
Department of Natural Sciences, Man-Technology-Environment Research Centre, Orebro University, SE-701 82 Orebro, Sweden. carl-johan.lothgren@sakab.se
Source
Chemosphere. 2005 Oct;61(3):405-12
Date
Oct-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adsorption
Air Pollutants - analysis - isolation & purification
Air Pollution - prevention & control
Dioxins - analysis - isolation & purification
Filtration
Hazardous Waste
Incineration
Models, Theoretical
Sweden
Water
Abstract
Dioxin levels measured after wet scrubbing systems have been found to be higher than levels measured before the scrubber. It is believed that there is an adsorption of PCDD/Fs on plastic materials in the scrubber. The PCDD/F levels after a polishing wet scrubber were followed continuously for 18 months using long-time sampling equipment at a hazardous waste incineration facility in Sweden. Each sampling period lasted two weeks. It was found that the levels during and shortly after start-up periods were elevated. The decline was very slowly, which supports a memory effect in the scrubber. Further, a multivariate model showed that the relation between different homologues changed over time, which is in agreement with a desorption model, taking into account the vapour pressures for different congeners.
PubMed ID
16182858 View in PubMed
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49 records – page 1 of 5.