Skip header and navigation

Refine By

33 records – page 1 of 4.

Appropriateness of anthropometric obesity indicators in assessment of coronary heart disease risk among Finnish men and women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180480
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2003;31(4):283-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Karri Silventoinen
Pekka Jousilahti
Erkki Vartiainen
Jaakko Tuomilehto
Author Affiliation
Division of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis 55454-1015, USA. silventoinen@epi.umn.edu
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2003;31(4):283-90
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Anthropometry
Coronary Disease - epidemiology - prevention & control
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology
Risk factors
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
The aim of the study was to compare the appropriateness of different obesity indicators in the assessment of coronary heart disease (CHD) risk.
The study cohort included 11,510 Finnish men and women aged 25 to 64 year at baseline who participated in a cardiovascular disease risk factor survey in 1987 or 1992. At baseline, data on smoking and diabetes were recorded, blood pressure. body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), and waist to hip ratio (WHR) were measured, and serum total and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol were determined. A follow-up was done to the end of 1997. Death or diagnosed event from CHD was used as an outcome variable.
At baseline, BMI was the best explaining variable for systolic and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and for total cholesterol, whereas WC was the best explaining variable for HDL cholesterol, among both men and women. During the follow-up, WHR was the best predictor of CHD incidence. However, after the adjustment for other CHD risk factors none of the obesity indicators remained statistically significant. In both sexes, BMI was a statistically significant predictor of CHD incidence among subjects with DBP lower than the mean. Among men, a similar interaction was seen between DBP and WC.
WHR was the best predictor of CHD incidence in our data. Abdominal obesity has an effect on CHD incidence independently of general obesity.
PubMed ID
15099034 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association of blood pressure and hypertension with the risk of Parkinson disease: the National FINRISK Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134840
Source
Hypertension. 2011 Jun;57(6):1094-100
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Chengxuan Qiu
Gang Hu
Miia Kivipelto
Tiina Laatikainen
Riitta Antikainen
Laura Fratiglioni
Pekka Jousilahti
Jaakko Tuomilehto
Author Affiliation
Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet, Gävlegatan 16, S-11330 Stockholm, Sweden. chengxuan.qiu@ki.se
Source
Hypertension. 2011 Jun;57(6):1094-100
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure - drug effects - physiology
Diastole
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Health Surveys - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Hypertension - complications - drug therapy - physiopathology
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Parkinson Disease - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk Assessment - methods - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Systole
Abstract
Cardiovascular risk factors, such as diabetes mellitus and central obesity, have been associated with Parkinson disease (PD), but data on blood pressure and PD are lacking. We sought to examine the association of blood pressure and hypertension with the risk of PD among men and women. This study consisted of 7 surveys (1972-2002) on representative samples of the general population in Finland (National FINRISK Study). A total number of 59 540 participants (age 25 to 74 years; 51.8% women) who were free of PD and stroke at baseline were prospectively followed until December 31, 2006, to identify incident PD cases using the National Social Insurance Register database. Cox proportional hazards models were constructed to estimate the hazard ratio of PD associated with blood pressure. During a mean follow-up period of 18.8 years (SD: 10.2 years), 423 men and 371 women were ascertained to have developed PD. In women, compared with normotensive subjects (
PubMed ID
21536985 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association of the Pro12Ala polymorphism in the PPAR-gamma2 gene with 3-year incidence of type 2 diabetes and body weight change in the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189220
Source
Diabetes. 2002 Aug;51(8):2581-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2002
Author
Virpi I Lindi
Matti I J Uusitupa
Jaana Lindström
Anne Louheranta
Johan G Eriksson
Timo T Valle
Helena Hämäläinen
Pirjo Ilanne-Parikka
Sirkka Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi
Markku Laakso
Jaakko Tuomilehto
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Nutrition, University of Kuopio and Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland. virpi.lindi@uku.fi
Source
Diabetes. 2002 Aug;51(8):2581-6
Date
Aug-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alanine
Amino Acid Substitution
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Body constitution
Body mass index
Body Weight - genetics
Diabetes Mellitus - prevention & control
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology - genetics
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Genotype
Glucose Intolerance - genetics
Humans
Incidence
Insulin - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Mutation, Missense
Polymorphism, Genetic
Proline
Receptors, Cytoplasmic and Nuclear - genetics
Regression Analysis
Transcription Factors - genetics
Abstract
The association of the Pro12Ala polymorphism of the PPAR-gamma2 gene with the incidence of type 2 diabetes was investigated in 522 subjects with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) participating in the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study. Subjects were randomized to either an intensive diet and exercise group or a control group. By 3 years of intervention, the odds ratio of the development of type 2 diabetes for subjects with the Ala12 allele was 2.11-fold compared with that for subjects with the Pro12Pro genotype (95% CI 1.20-3.72). The risk for type 2 diabetes increased also in subjects who gained weight or belonged to the control group. In the intervention group, subjects with the Ala12Ala genotype lost more weight during the follow-up than subjects with other genotypes (Pro12Pro vs. Ala12Ala P = 0.043), and none of subjects with the Ala12Ala genotype developed type 2 diabetes in this group. In conclusion, the Ala12 allele may predispose to the development of type 2 diabetes in obese subjects with IGT. However, beneficial changes in diet, increases in physical activity, and weight loss may reverse, to some extent, the diabetogenic impact of the Ala12 allele, possibly due to an improved insulin sensitivity.
PubMed ID
12145174 View in PubMed
Less detail

Blood pressure, smoking, and the incidence of lung cancer in hypertensive men in North Karelia, Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183927
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2003 Sep 1;158(5):442-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1-2003
Author
Annamarja Lindgren
Eero Pukkala
Aulikki Nissinen
Jaakko Tuomilehto
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and General Practice, University of Kuopio, Kuopio, Finland. Lindgren@hytti.uku.fi
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2003 Sep 1;158(5):442-7
Date
Sep-1-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood Pressure - physiology
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Diastole - physiology
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology - physiopathology
Incidence
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Reference Values
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Systole - physiology
Abstract
Few studies have suggested that elevated blood pressure might be associated with increased risk of lung cancer and that this association might vary according to smoking status. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of blood pressure and its possible interaction with smoking on lung cancer incidence in hypertensive patients. Lung cancer incidence was determined for 7,908 men enrolled in the hypertension register of the North Karelia Project between 1972 and 1988 by record linkage to the nationwide Finnish Cancer Registry. In a Cox regression model, both systolic and diastolic blood pressures were significant predictors of lung cancer, with a 10% increase in risk per 10-mmHg increment in blood pressure. In smokers, the age-adjusted hazard ratio associated with a 10-mmHg increment in diastolic blood pressure was 1.17 (95% confidence interval: 1.05, 1.29), and in nonsmokers it was 0.98 (95% confidence interval: 0.80, 1.16). For systolic blood pressure, these hazard ratios were 1.11 (95% confidence interval: 1.05, 1.17) for smokers and 1.04 (95% confidence interval: 0.95, 1.14) for nonsmokers. These findings suggest that high blood pressure levels are associated with increased risk of lung cancer in smoking, hypertensive men.
PubMed ID
12936899 View in PubMed
Less detail

Body fat measured by a near-infrared interactance device as a predictor of cardiovascular events: the FINRISK'92 cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139901
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2011 Apr;19(4):848-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Pia Pajunen
Pekka Jousilahti
Katja Borodulin
Kennet Harald
Jaakko Tuomilehto
Veikko Salomaa
Author Affiliation
Diabetes Prevention Unit, Department of Chronic Disease Prevention, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland. pia.pajunen@thl.fi
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2011 Apr;19(4):848-52
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue
Adult
Anthropometry - methods
Body Composition
Body mass index
Coronary Disease - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Spectroscopy, Near-Infrared - methods
Stroke - epidemiology
Waist Circumference
Waist-Hip Ratio
Abstract
We evaluated how body fat percentage, measured by a portable near-infrared interactance (NIR) device predicts cardiovascular (CVD), coronary heart disease (CHD), and ischemic stroke events in a prospective population-based survey. The study population consisted of 2,842 men and 3,196 women, who participated in the FINRISK'92 survey. Obesity was assessed with BMI, waist circumference, and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) and body fat percentage measured with an NIR. Mean length of follow-up was 9 years and 3 months. In Cox proportional hazards regression analyses for men, BMI, waist circumference, and WHR as well as body fat percentage were predictors of a CVD event when adjusted for age and for major risk factors. Hazard ratio (HR) per 1 s.d. was 1.27 (95% confidence interval: 1.10-1.48) for body fat percentage, 1.30 (1.16-1.46) for BMI, and 1.31 (1.16-1.50) for waist circumference. Among women, the body fat lost its predictive power in a fully adjusted model. Body fat percentage, BMI, waist circumference, and WHR were predictors of a CHD event both among men and women, whereas body fat percentage did not predict ischemic stroke among either gender. We observed that body fat percentage measured by an NIR device was a significant predictor of CVD and CHD events among men and women, but in our population-based survey, it did not provide any additional predictive power over and above the simpler measures, such as BMI or WHR.
PubMed ID
20966903 View in PubMed
Less detail

Body mass index and cancer incidence: the FINRISK study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103065
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2014 Jul;29(7):477-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2014
Author
Xin Song
Eero Pukkala
Tadeusz Dyba
Jaakko Tuomilehto
Vladislav Moltchanov
Satu Männistö
Pekka Jousilahti
Qing Qiao
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Hjelt Institute, University of Helsinki, Mannerheimintie 172, PL41, 00014, Helsinki, Finland, xin.song@helsinki.fi.
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2014 Jul;29(7):477-87
Date
Jul-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Body mass index
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Obesity - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
The relation between body mass index (BMI) and risk of cancer incidence is controversial. Cancer incidence during 1972-2008 in relation to BMI was investigated in a prospective cohort of 54,725 Finns aged 24-74 years and free of cancer at enrollment. Over a mean follow-up of 20.6 years, 8,429 (15.4%) incident cancers were recorded, 4,208 (49.9%) from men. Both parametric and nonparametric approaches were used to evaluate the shape of the relationship between BMI and incidence of cancer. BMI had a linear positive association with incidence of cancers of the colon, liver, kidney, bladder and all sites combined in men, and of cancers of the stomach, colon, gallbladder and ovary in women, an inverse association with incidence of cancers of the lung in men and the lung and breast in women, a J-shaped association with incidence of all cancers combined in women. High BMI in women was associated with an increased overall cancer risk in never smokers but a reduced risk in smokers. Elevated BMI was associated with an increased risk of incidence of cancers of certain sites.
PubMed ID
24997743 View in PubMed
Less detail

Coffee and tea consumption and the risk of Parkinson's disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161791
Source
Mov Disord. 2007 Nov 15;22(15):2242-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-2007
Author
Gang Hu
Siamak Bidel
Pekka Jousilahti
Riitta Antikainen
Jaakko Tuomilehto
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Promotion and Chronic Diseases Prevention, National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland. hu.gang@ktl.fi
Source
Mov Disord. 2007 Nov 15;22(15):2242-8
Date
Nov-15-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Coffee
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Food Habits
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Parkinson disease - epidemiology
Prejudice
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Risk Reduction Behavior
Tea
Abstract
Several prospective studies have assessed the association between coffee consumption and Parkinson's disease (PD) risk, but the results are inconsistent. We examined the association of coffee and tea consumption with the risk of incident PD among 29,335 Finnish subjects aged 25 to 74 years without a history of PD at baseline. During a mean follow-up of 12.9 years, 102 men and 98 women developed an incident PD. The multivariate-adjusted (age, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, education, leisure-time physical activity, smoking, alcohol and tea consumption, and history of diabetes) hazard ratios (HRs) of PD associated with the amount of coffee consumed daily (0, 1-4, and > or = 5 cups) were 1.00, 0.55, and 0.41 (P for trend = 0.063) in men, 1.00, 0.50, and 0.39 (P for trend = 0.073) in women, and 1.00, 0.53, and 0.40 (P for trend = 0.005) in men and women combined (adjusted also for sex), respectively. In both sexes combined, the multivariate-adjusted HRs of PD for subjects drinking > or = 3 cups of tea daily compared with tea nondrinkers was 0.41 (95% CI 0.20-0.83). These results suggest that coffee drinking is associated with a lower risk of PD. More tea drinking is associated with a lower risk of PD.
PubMed ID
17712848 View in PubMed
Less detail

Coffee consumption and risk of gastric and pancreatic cancer--a prospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121687
Source
Int J Cancer. 2013 Apr 1;132(7):1651-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1-2013
Author
Siamak Bidel
Gang Hu
Pekka Jousilahti
Eero Pukkala
Timo Hakulinen
Jaakko Tuomilehto
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. siamak.bidel@thl.fi
Source
Int J Cancer. 2013 Apr 1;132(7):1651-9
Date
Apr-1-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Coffee - adverse effects
Drinking Behavior
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Pancreatic Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Stomach Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
Only few prospective studies have examined the association between coffee consumption and risk of gastric and pancreatic cancer. This study is designed to evaluate this relationship among Finns, whose coffee consumption is the highest in the world. A total of 60,041 Finnish men and women who were 26-74 years of age and without history of any cancer at baseline were included in the present analyses. Coffee consumption and other study parameters were determined at baseline using standardized measurements. Participants were prospectively followed up for onset of gastric and/or pancreatic cancer, emigration, death or until June 30, 2006. During a mean follow-up period of 18 years, 299 cases of gastric cancer and 235 cases of pancreatic cancer were found. There was a nonsignificant inverse association between coffee consumption and risk of gastric cancer among men but not in the women. The multivariate-adjusted hazard ratio of stomach and pancreatic cancer incidence for = 10 cups of coffee per day compared with nondrinkers were 0.75 (95% CI, 0.40-1.41) (P for trend = 0.19) and 0.82 (95% CI, 0.38-1.76) (P for trend = 0.95) for the combined population of men and women, respectively. We did not find a significant association between coffee consumption and the risk of gastric and/or pancreatic cancers.
PubMed ID
22886387 View in PubMed
Less detail

Coffee consumption and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus among middle-aged Finnish men and women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181201
Source
JAMA. 2004 Mar 10;291(10):1213-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-10-2004
Author
Jaakko Tuomilehto
Gang Hu
Siamak Bidel
Jaana Lindström
Pekka Jousilahti
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Health Promotion, National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland. jaakko.tuomilehto@ktl.fi
Source
JAMA. 2004 Mar 10;291(10):1213-9
Date
Mar-10-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Coffee - physiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk
Abstract
Only a few studies of coffee consumption and diabetes mellitus (DM) have been reported, even though coffee is the most consumed beverage in the world.
To determine the relationship between coffee consumption and the incidence of type 2 DM among Finnish individuals, who have the highest coffee consumption in the world.
A prospective study from combined surveys conducted in 1982, 1987, and 1992 of 6974 Finnish men and 7655 women aged 35 to 64 years without history of stroke, coronary heart disease, or DM at baseline, with 175 682 person-years of follow-up. Coffee consumption and other study parameters were determined at baseline using standardized measurements.
Hazard ratios (HRs) for the incidence of type 2 DM were estimated for different levels of daily coffee consumption.
During a mean follow-up of 12 years, there were 381 incident cases of type 2 DM. After adjustment for confounding factors (age, study year, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, education, occupational, commuting and leisure-time physical activity, alcohol and tea consumption, and smoking), the HRs of DM associated with the amount of coffee consumed daily (0-2, 3-4, 5-6, 7-9, > or =10 cups) were 1.00, 0.71 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.48-1.05), 0.39 (95% CI, 0.25-0.60), 0.39 (95% CI, 0.20-0.74), and 0.21 (95% CI, 0.06-0.69) (P for trend
Notes
Comment In: J Hum Hypertens. 2006 Jun;20(6):470-216554843
PubMed ID
15010442 View in PubMed
Less detail

Continuous 15-year decrease in incidence and mortality of stroke in Finland: the FINSTROKE study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182156
Source
Stroke. 2004 Feb;35(2):420-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2004
Author
Juhani Sivenius
Jaakko Tuomilehto
Pirjo Immonen-Räihä
Minna Kaarisalo
Cinzia Sarti
Jorma Torppa
Kari Kuulasmaa
Markku Mähönen
Aapo Lehtonen
Veikko Salomaa
Author Affiliation
University Hospital of Kuopio, Brain Research and Rehabilitation Center Neuron, Kuopio, Finland. juhani.sivenius@fimnet.fi
Source
Stroke. 2004 Feb;35(2):420-5
Date
Feb-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Sex Distribution
Stroke - mortality
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to analyze the incidence and mortality trends in stroke events among persons 25 to 74 years of age in Finland during 1983 to 1997.
The population-based FINSTROKE register recorded 5650 new strokes among persons 25 to 74 years of age in 2 geographical areas of Finland: 2770 in the Kuopio area (east central Finland) and 2880 in Turku (southwestern Finland). Of these, 3065 were men and 2585 were women.
The rates of acute stroke events fell during the whole study period in both men and women. In both FINSTROKE areas combined, the average annual decline in the age-standardized incidence of first stroke events was 2.0% (95% confidence interval [CI], -2.8 to -1.2; P
PubMed ID
14707234 View in PubMed
Less detail

33 records – page 1 of 4.