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ADHD symptoms across the lifespan: a comparison of symptoms captured by the Wender and Barkley Scales and DSM-IV criteria in a population-based Swedish sample aged 65 to 80.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266788
Source
J Atten Disord. 2015 May;19(5):390-404
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Taina Guldberg-Kjär
Boo Johansson
Source
J Atten Disord. 2015 May;19(5):390-404
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attention - physiology
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - diagnosis - psychology
Chronic Disease
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Female
Humans
Impulsive Behavior
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Self Report
Sweden
Abstract
The aim was to compare different scales capturing ADHD symptoms for older individuals' self-reports about childhood and current ADHD symptomatology. An additional aim was relating these results to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed.; DSM-IV) ADHD criteria.
The 25-item Wender Utah Rating Scale (WURS) administered in a population-based sample of 1,599 individuals aged 65 to 80. Two subsamples each with 30 individuals were randomly drawn based on their Wender Utah Rating Scale (WURS) scores, and studied using the Wender Riktad ADHD Symtom Skala (WRASS), interview assessed Barkley Scales, and DSM-IV ADHD criteria.
Higher WURS and WRASS scores were related to higher Barkley Childhood and Current Symptoms Scales Scores. Also, reporting more symptoms on these scales was related to meeting DSM-IV criteria for childhood and current ADHD.
The results support significant persistence of ADHD symptoms when using different scales designed for the capture of childhood and current ADHD symptomatology. Further studies of ADHD in a lifespan perspective are encouraged.
PubMed ID
24356331 View in PubMed
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ADHD symptoms and insistence on sameness in Prader-Willi syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174886
Source
J Intellect Disabil Res. 2005 Jun;49(Pt 6):449-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
M. Wigren
S. Hansen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Göteborg University, Box 500, SE-405 30 Göteborg, Sweden. margareta.wigren@psy.gu.se
Source
J Intellect Disabil Res. 2005 Jun;49(Pt 6):449-56
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - psychology
Child
Child, Preschool
Compulsive Behavior - psychology
Female
Humans
Impulsive Behavior - psychology
Male
Parents
Prader-Willi Syndrome - psychology
Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
Apart from a pervasive eating disorder, the Prader-Willi (PWS) syndrome is characterized by a distinct behavioural profile comprising maladaptive behaviours, obsessive-compulsive traits and skin picking, all included in the PWS behavioural phenotype. In this study, we present a further delineation of this characteristic behavioural profile by screening for indices of executive dysfunctions related to attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), immature compulsive-like adherence to sameness and skin picking, and how these features aggregate into symptom constellations in children and adolescents with PWS.
Parents of 58 individuals with PWS (aged 5-18 years) participated by completing Childhood Routines Inventory (CRI) and Conners' Parent Rating Scale (CPRS-48).
Results showed that indices of ADHD and excessive insistence on sameness were common, comorbid and of early onset. They were both associated with conduct problems. Skin picking, appearing as a single and comorbid symptom, was less associated with childlike compulsions and ADHD-related problems.
Findings are discussed in terms of further research in executive dysfunctions in PWS.
PubMed ID
15882394 View in PubMed
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Adolescent gambling and problem gambling: does the total consumption model apply?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160670
Source
J Gambl Stud. 2008 Jun;24(2):135-49
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Marianne Hansen
Ingeborg Rossow
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute for Alcohol and Drug Research, Sentrum, P.O. Box 565, Oslo 0105, Norway. mh@sirus.no
Source
J Gambl Stud. 2008 Jun;24(2):135-49
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Adult
Behavior, Addictive - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Gambling - psychology
Humans
Impulsive Behavior - diagnosis - epidemiology
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Models, Psychological
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Risk-Taking
Self Concept
Social Behavior
Students - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
This study describes the extent and distribution of gambling among Norwegian adolescents. The study assesses whether gambling frequency and expenditures and prevalence of problem gambling are associated both at the individual and aggregate (school) level, and in particular whether the total consumption model applies to gambling behaviour. Data comprised a national representative sample of 11,637 13- to 19-year-old students in 73 schools (response rate 92.3%). The Lie/Bet Questionnaire and an additional DSM-criterion on chasing the losses were applied to assess problem gambling. A majority (78.5%) had gambled during the last year and 3.1% met all three criteria for problem gambling. Gambling frequency and expenditures were much higher among problem gamblers and increased proportionally with the degree of problem gambling. The 6.1% who scored on both Lie/Bet items accounted for 59% of all gambling expenditures on slot machines. Positive and significant correlations between various indicators of problem gambling and the overall amount of gambling at the aggregate (school) level imply that the higher the overall amount of gambling and gambling expenditures are, the higher the prevalence of problem gambling, which indicates that the total consumption model also applies to gambling behaviour among adolescents.
PubMed ID
17955348 View in PubMed
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Adolescent impulsivity and soft drink consumption: The role of parental regulation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277047
Source
Appetite. 2016 Jan 1;96:432-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1-2016
Author
Elisabeth L Melbye
Ingunn H Bergh
Solveig E S Hausken
Ester F C Sleddens
Kari Glavin
Nanna Lien
Mona Bjelland
Source
Appetite. 2016 Jan 1;96:432-42
Date
Jan-1-2016
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Carbonated Beverages
Cross-Sectional Studies
Feeding Behavior - psychology
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Impulsive Behavior
Linear Models
Male
Norway
Parent-Child Relations
Parenting
Social Environment
Socioeconomic Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
The present study aimed to explore the process in which impulsivity might influence soft drink consumption in adolescents, addressing potential mediating effects of perceived parental regulation regarding unhealthy eating. A cross-sectional survey was performed among 440 13-15-year-olds in Eastern Norway. The survey questionnaire included measures of impulsivity, six types of maternal and paternal regulation (as perceived by the adolescents), and consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB). Parallel multiple-mediator analyses were performed to reveal potential mediating effects of perceived parental regulatory behaviors on the association between adolescent impulsivity and SSB consumption. Separate models were run for maternal and paternal regulation. Results from our model analyses (both maternal and paternal models) indicated that all the six measured parental regulatory behaviors jointly acted as mediators on the association between adolescent impulsivity and SSB consumption. However, only perceived maternal and paternal legitimacy of regulation showed a unique contribution to the mediated effect. This finding suggests that adolescents' perception of parental legitimate authority is of particular importance in explaining the relationship between impulsivity and unhealthy eating behaviors in adolescents. Future nutrition interventions targeting adolescents and their parents should take personal factors such as adolescents' level of impulsivity into account. Ultimately; what may be an appropriate approach to impulsive individuals and their parents may diverge from what may be an appropriate approach to less impulsive individuals and their parents.
PubMed ID
26456410 View in PubMed
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Affect regulation and psychopathology in women with borderline personality disorder.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118764
Source
Dan Med J. 2012 Nov;59(11):A4521
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Rune Andersen
Nina Timmerby
Erik Simonsen
Author Affiliation
Psykiatrisk Forskningsenhed, Region Sjælland, Roskilde, Denmark. runan@regionsjaelland.dk
Source
Dan Med J. 2012 Nov;59(11):A4521
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Affect
Affective Symptoms - etiology
Aggression - psychology
Borderline Personality Disorder - complications - diagnosis - psychology
Denmark
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Female
Humans
Impulsive Behavior - etiology
Interpersonal Relations
Middle Aged
Personality Inventory - standards - statistics & numerical data
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychometrics
Psychopathology
Self Report
Self-Injurious Behavior - etiology
Translating
Abstract
Dysfunction in affect regulation is a prominent feature that grossly impairs behavioural and interpersonal domains of experience and underlies a great deal of the psychopathology in borderline personality disorder (BPD). However, no study has yet been published that evaluates the psychometric properties of the translated Danish version of self-report measures sensitive to the different aspects and dimensions of dysfunction in affect regulation prevalent in BPD.
This study comprised a group of women diagnosed with BPD (n = 29) and a comparison group of healthy subjects (n = 29) who reported psychopathology and levels of affective instability, aggression, impulsivity and alexithymia by self-report measures.
Our results demonstrated that women with BPD have significant psychopathology and report significantly higher levels of dysfunction in separate components of affect regulation by self-report measures than the comparison group of healthy subjects. Our results also provided partial support for the psychometric appropriateness and clinical relevance of the translated Danish version of affect regulation measures.
The normative reference range indicated by our results makes the measures useful as a practical assessment tool.
not relevant.
PubMed ID
23171744 View in PubMed
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Age and vengeance as predictors of mild driver aggression.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176072
Source
Violence Vict. 2004 Aug;19(4):469-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2004
Author
Dwight A Hennessy
David L Wiesenthal
Author Affiliation
Buffalo State College, NY, USA. hennesda@buffalostate.edu
Source
Violence Vict. 2004 Aug;19(4):469-77
Date
Aug-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aggression - psychology
Anger
Automobile Driving - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Impulsive Behavior - epidemiology - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Ontario
Predictive value of tests
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Violence
Abstract
The present study examined the influence of driver age and vengeance on mild aggression among drivers with at least 5 years experience. Mild aggression decreased with age among low vengeance drivers and changed little across age groups among moderately vengeful drivers. However, mild driver aggression actually increased with age among highly vengeful drivers. Results are interpreted in terms of the aggressive nature of an enduring vengeful attitude.
PubMed ID
15726939 View in PubMed
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Alcohol use and drunk driving: the modifying effect of impulsivity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118506
Source
J Stud Alcohol Drugs. 2013 Jan;74(1):114-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Inger Synnøve Moan
Thor Norström
Elisabet E Storvoll
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute for Alcohol and Drug Research (SIRUS), Oslo, Norway. ism@sirus.no
Source
J Stud Alcohol Drugs. 2013 Jan;74(1):114-9
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Alcoholic Intoxication - epidemiology
Automobile Driving - legislation & jurisprudence
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Impulsive Behavior - epidemiology
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Abstract
The aim of this study was twofold: (a) to examine how an increase in the frequency of heavy drinking episodes affects the incidence of drunk driving and (b) to examine whether the effect of alcohol use on drunk driving is contingent on impulsivity.
Two waves of the Young in Norway Longitudinal Study were applied (N = 2,603; response rate: 67%), when the respondents were on average 17 (1994) and 28 (2005) years of age. Measurements consisted of self-reported heavy episodic drinking, drunk driving, and impulsivity.
The first difference method was applied to estimate the association between heavy episodic drinking and drunk driving. This means that changes in the frequency of drunk driving were regressed on changes in the frequency of drinking. In this way, the effects of time-invariant confounders were eliminated. The results showed that every additional episode of heavy drinking was associated with a 2.6% increase in the frequency of drunk driving. The increase for males was significantly higher than among females. The analyses supported the hypothesis that impulsivity modifies the association between alcohol use and drunk driving.
The association between drinking and drunk driving is significantly stronger among those with a high score on impulsivity compared with those who have a low score.
PubMed ID
23200156 View in PubMed
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An empirical analysis of risk-taking in car driving and other aspects of life.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279332
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 2016 Dec;97:57-68
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2016
Author
Kibrom A Abay
Fred L Mannering
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 2016 Dec;97:57-68
Date
Dec-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Automobile Driving - psychology
Decision Making
Denmark
Female
Humans
Impulsive Behavior
Leisure Activities - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Risk-Taking
Young Adult
Abstract
The link between risk-taking behavior in various aspects of life has long been an area of debate among economists and psychologists. Using an extensive data set from Denmark, this study provides an empirical investigation of the link between risky driving and risk taking in other aspects of life, including risk-taking behavior in financial and labor-market decisions. Specifically, we establish significant positive correlations between individuals' risk-taking behavior in car driving and their risk-taking behavior in financial and labor-market decisions. However, we find that the strength of these correlations vary significantly between genders, and across risk decisions. These correlations and their differences across genders get stronger when we construct more "homogenous" groups by restricting our sample to those individuals with at least some stock-market participation. Overall, the empirical results in this study suggest that risk-taking behavior in various aspects of life can be associated, and our results corroborate previous evidence on the link between individuals' risk preferences across various aspects of life. This implies that individuals' driving behavior, which is commonly unobservable, can be more fully understood using observable labor market and financial decisions of individuals.
PubMed ID
27566958 View in PubMed
Less detail

The ASRS-6 has two latent factors: attention deficit and hyperactivity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127802
Source
J Atten Disord. 2013 Apr;17(3):203-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
Morten Hesse
Author Affiliation
Centre for Alcohol and Drug Research, Aarhus University, Copenhagen, Denmark. mh@crf.au.dk
Source
J Atten Disord. 2013 Apr;17(3):203-7
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antisocial Personality Disorder - diagnosis - psychology - rehabilitation
Attention
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - diagnosis - psychology - rehabilitation
Comorbidity
Denmark
Exploratory Behavior
Female
Humans
Impulsive Behavior - diagnosis - psychology - rehabilitation
Male
Motor Activity
Opiate Substitution Treatment
Opioid-Related Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - rehabilitation
Psychometrics - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Reference Values
Reproducibility of Results
Statistics as Topic
Students - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
To test whether the adult self-report scale for ADHD, six-items version (ASRS-6), measures inattentiveness and hyperactivity independently.
The ASRS-6 was completed by 234 university students and 157 outpatients treated for drug dependence. In both samples, the ASRS-6 was subjected to two confirmatory factor analyses, one testing a one-factor model and the other testing a model with two correlated factors indicating inattentiveness and hyperactivity, respectively. Test-retest reliability of the subscales was tested on a subset of the student sample (n = 25).
In both samples, the one-factor solution did not fit the data, but the two-factor solution fit the data better. Subscales differed in their correlates in ways that mirror the correlates of inattentiveness and hyperactivity in the published literature on ADHD. In the student sample, the test-retest reliability was adequate for hyperactivity (r = .70) and inattentiveness (r = .77).
The ASRS-6 measures two correlated constructs, rather than one unitary construct.
PubMed ID
22262467 View in PubMed
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Association between catechol O-methyltransferase (COMT) haplotypes and severity of hyperactivity symptoms in adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155112
Source
Am J Med Genet B Neuropsychiatr Genet. 2009 Apr 5;150B(3):403-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-5-2009
Author
H. Halleland
A J Lundervold
A. Halmøy
J. Haavik
S. Johansson
Author Affiliation
Department of Biological and Medical Psychology, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. helene.halleland@psybp.uib.no
Source
Am J Med Genet B Neuropsychiatr Genet. 2009 Apr 5;150B(3):403-10
Date
Apr-5-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alleles
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - enzymology - genetics
Case-Control Studies
Catechol O-Methyltransferase - genetics
Female
Gene Frequency
Genetic markers
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Haplotypes
Humans
Hyperkinesis - genetics
Impulsive Behavior - genetics
Linkage Disequilibrium
Male
Norway
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
It has been suggested that symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is related to low dopamine levels in the prefrontal cortex. The enzyme catechol O-methyltransferase (COMT), which degrades dopamine and other catecholamines, is important for monoamine signaling in this brain-region, but genetic studies of the functional Val158Met (rs4680) polymorphism in ADHD have been inconsistent. However, recently it was shown that also common synonymous COMT variants modulate total COMT enzymatic activity by affecting the expression of the gene [Nackley et al. (2006); Science 314(5807):1930-1933]. We therefore hypothesized that analysis of haplotypes could reveal more about the association between COMT and ADHD symptoms than the Val158Met polymorphism alone. SNPs rs6269, rs4633, rs4818, and rs4680, tagging the common putative functional COMT haplotypes, were genotyped in 435 adult subjects with a clinical diagnosis of ADHD and 383 controls and analyzed for association with ADHD and the hyperactivity/impulsivity and inattention dimensions from the Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS). All markers showed a trend for association with the hyperactivity/impulsivity scale, peaking at marker rs6269 (P = 0.007). Haplotype analysis revealed that the rs6269 risk allele tags the suggested high COMT-activity haplotype, which is associated with the highest hyperactivity/impulsivity score in our sample (P = 0.01). Our results also suggest that there is a stepwise decreased hyperactivity/impulsivity score associated with the proposed mid and low activity haplotypes described previously. In conclusion, we suggest that COMT haplotype variation is associated primarily with the hyperactivity/impulsivity dimension of ADHD and point to the importance of testing this hypothesis in future studies.
PubMed ID
18802928 View in PubMed
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110 records – page 1 of 11.