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A 1-year, placebo-controlled, double-blind house-dust-mite immunotherapy study in asthmatic adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15782
Source
Allergy. 1997 Aug;52(8):853-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1997
Author
O T Olsen
K R Larsen
L. Jacobsan
U G Svendsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Pulmonery Medicine and Allergology, Gentofte Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Hellerup, Denmark.
Source
Allergy. 1997 Aug;52(8):853-9
Date
Aug-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adrenergic beta-Agonists - therapeutic use
Adult
Antigens, Dermatophagoides
Asthma - diagnosis - drug therapy - therapy
Bronchial Provocation Tests
Double-Blind Method
Female
Forced expiratory volume
Glycoproteins - administration & dosage - adverse effects - immunology
Humans
Immunoglobulin E - analysis - blood - immunology
Immunotherapy
Male
Middle Aged
Peak Expiratory Flow Rate
Severity of Illness Index
Skin Tests
Steroids - therapeutic use
Vital Capacity
Abstract
Thirty-one adult patients with asthma caused by house-dust mites (HDM) were included in this placebo-controlled, double-blind study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of specific immunotherapy (SIT) with biologically standardized extracts of HDM. The specific diagnosis was confirmed by skin prick tests, specific IgE, and bronchial provocation tests with HDM allergens. The patients were randomized to receive active treatment with extracts of either Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Dpt) or D. farinae (Dfa) (Alutard SQ, ALK, Denmark) or placebo injections. Twenty-three patients completed the study. After 1 year of treatment, we found a clinically important and significant reduction in both asthma medicine consumption (inhaled steroids 38% and beta 2-agonists 46%) and symptom score (57%) in the actively treated group, but not the placebo group. These findings were confirmed by a significant decrease in skin and bronchial sensitivity to HDM in the active group. Additionally, there was a significant difference in the patients' scores for effect in favor of the actively treated group. Total IgE and specific IgE to HDM showed no significant changes before and after treatment for either group. Spirometric lung-function measurements showed a significant increase in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) from 85% before to 89% of predicted values after treatment for the actively treated group. Peak-flow measurements at home showed no significant changes during the study. It is concluded that allergen SIT is an effective treatment in adult patients suffering from asthma due to HDM.
PubMed ID
9284985 View in PubMed
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99th Dahlem conference on infection, inflammation and chronic inflammatory disorders: immune therapies of type 1 diabetes: new opportunities based on the hygiene hypothesis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144028
Source
Clin Exp Immunol. 2010 Apr;160(1):106-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
L. Chatenoud
S. You
H. Okada
C. Kuhn
B. Michaud
J-F Bach
Author Affiliation
Université Paris Descarte, Paris, France. lucienne.chatenoud@inserm.fr
Source
Clin Exp Immunol. 2010 Apr;160(1):106-12
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Animals
Autoantigens - immunology
Bacteria - immunology
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - immunology - therapy
Europe - epidemiology
Humans
Hygiene
Hypersensitivity - immunology
Immunosuppression - methods
Immunotherapy - methods
Infection - immunology - microbiology
Mice
Pancreatitis - immunology - microbiology
Toll-Like Receptors - agonists
Young Adult
Abstract
Insulin-dependent (type 1) diabetes is a prototypic organ-specific autoimmune disease resulting from the selective destruction of insulin-secreting beta cells within pancreatic islets of Langerhans by an immune-mediated inflammation involving autoreactive CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes which infiltrate pancreatic islets. Current treatment is substitutive, i.e. chronic use of exogenous insulin which, in spite of significant advances, is still associated with major constraints (multiple daily injections, risks of hypoglycaemia) and lack of effectiveness over the long term in preventing severe degenerative complications. Finding a cure for autoimmune diabetes by establishing effective immune-based therapies is a real medical health challenge, as the disease incidence increases steadily in industrialized countries. As the disease affects mainly children and young adults, any candidate immune therapy must therefore be safe and avoid a sustained depression of immune responses with the attendant problems of recurrent infection and drug toxicity. Thus, inducing or restoring immune tolerance to target autoantigens, controlling the pathogenic response while preserving the host reactivity to exogenous/unrelated antigens, appears to be the ideal approach. Our objective is to review the major progress accomplished over the last 20 years towards that aim. In addition, we would like to present another interesting possibility to access new preventive strategies based on the 'hygiene hypothesis', which proposes a causal link between the increasing incidence of autoimmune diseases, including diabetes, and the decrease of the infectious burden. The underlying rationale is to identify microbial-derived compounds mediating the protective activity of infections which could be developed therapeutically.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20415859 View in PubMed
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Acellular pertussis vaccines. Efficacy and evaluation of clinical case definitions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59695
Source
Am J Dis Child. 1991 Nov;145(11):1285-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1991
Author
W C Blackwelder
J. Storsaeter
P. Olin
H O Hallander
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Bethesda, Md.
Source
Am J Dis Child. 1991 Nov;145(11):1285-9
Date
Nov-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Immunotherapy - standards
Infant
Pertussis Vaccine - therapeutic use
Research Design - standards
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sensitivity and specificity
Sweden - epidemiology
Whooping Cough - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
The efficacy of two acellular pertussis vaccines was estimated for various clinical case definitions, with and without the requirement of culture confirmation, from a randomized trial in Sweden. Efficacy increased with duration of coughing spasms and when the case definition included whoops or whoops plus at least nine coughing spasms a day. After deletion of clinical cases not believed to be caused by pertussis, efficacies were closer to the higher values for culture-confirmed disease. Nonspecificity of the clinical criterion "21 days of coughing spasms with whoops" resulted in estimates of predictive value for pertussis of 85% for placebo recipients and 56% for vaccinees. We conclude that laboratory confirmation of suspected cases is needed in pertussis vaccine trials. A suggested case definition is 21 days or more of coughing spasms with confirmation by culture, serologic study, or household exposure to culture-confirmed pertussis.
PubMed ID
1951222 View in PubMed
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Adoptive transfer of allergic airway responses with sensitized lymphocytes in BN rats.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57674
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1995 Jul;152(1):64-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1995
Author
A. Watanabe
P. Rossi
P M Renzi
L J Xu
R D Guttmann
J G Martin
Author Affiliation
Meakins-Christie Laboratories, McGill University, Royal Victoria Hospital, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1995 Jul;152(1):64-70
Date
Jul-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Bronchial Hyperreactivity - immunology - physiopathology
Bronchial Provocation Tests
Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid - cytology
Eosinophils - immunology
Immunoglobulin E - immunology
Immunotherapy, Adoptive
Male
Ovalbumin - immunology
Passive Cutaneous Anaphylaxis - immunology
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Rats, Sprague-Dawley
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Hypersensitivity - immunology - physiopathology
Serum Albumin, Bovine - immunology
T-Lymphocytes - immunology
Abstract
To evaluate the role of lymphocytes in the pathogenesis of allergic bronchoconstriction, we investigated whether allergic airway responses are adoptively transferred by antigen-primed lymphocytes in Brown Norway (BN) rats. Animals were actively sensitized to ovalbumin (OA) or sham sensitized, and 14 d later mononuclear cells (MNCs) were isolated from intrathoracic lymph nodes, passed through a nylon wool column, and transferred to naive syngeneic rats. Recipients were challenged with aerosolized OA or bovine serum albumin (BSA) (5% wt/vol) and analyzed for changes in lung resistance (RL), airway responsiveness to inhaled methacholine (MCh), and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells. Recipients of MNCs from sensitized rats responded to OA inhalation and exhibited sustained increases in RL throughout the 8-h observation period, but without usual early airway responses. Recipients of sham-sensitized MNCs or BSA-challenged recipients failed to respond to antigen challenge. At 32 h after OA exposure, airway responsiveness to MCh was increased in four of seven rats that had received sensitized MNCs (p = 0.035). BAL eosinophils increased at 32 h in the recipients of both sensitized and sham-sensitized MNCs. However, eosinophil numbers in BAL were inversely correlated with airway responsiveness in the recipients of sensitized MNCs (r = -0.788, p = 0.036). OA-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) was undetectable by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) or passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) in recipient rats following adoptive transfer. In conclusion, allergic late airway responses (LAR) and cholinergic airway hyperresponsiveness, but not antigen-specific IgE and early responses, were adoptively transferred by antigen-primed lymphocytes in BN rats.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
7599864 View in PubMed
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Adoptive transfer of experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis in HgCl2 injected rats.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57752
Source
Curr Eye Res. 1992;11 Suppl:101-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
A. Saoudi
B. Bellon
Y. de Kozak
P. Druet
Author Affiliation
Pathologie rénale et vasculaire, INSERM U28, Hôpital Broussais, Paris, France.
Source
Curr Eye Res. 1992;11 Suppl:101-5
Date
1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antigens - immunology
Arrestin
Autoantigens - immunology
Autoimmune Diseases - immunology - therapy
Disease Models, Animal
Eye Proteins - immunology
Female
Immunoglobulin E - analysis
Immunotherapy, Adoptive
Male
Mercuric Chloride
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Rats, Inbred Lew
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retinitis - immunology - therapy
T-Lymphocytes - immunology
Uveitis - immunology - therapy
Abstract
We previously demonstrated that mercuric chloride (HgCl2) injected-(Lewis x Brown-Norway) F1 rats are protected against experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis (EAU) induced by active immunization with the retinal S-antigen (S-Ag). To better understand the mechanisms of the protection promoted by HgCl2, we studied the effect of HgCl2-induced autoimmune disease on transferred EAU. We demonstrate herein that HgCl2 has no effect on adoptively transferred EAU. Therefore, the HgCl2-induced autoimmune disease does not affect effector S-Ag specific T cells activated in vitro but acts at an earlier stage.
PubMed ID
1424735 View in PubMed
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[Adverse effects of new immunologic drugs for melanoma and their management in adult patients].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272460
Source
Duodecim. 2016;132(1):45-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Siru Mäkelä
Micaela Hernberg
Pia Vihinen
Source
Duodecim. 2016;132(1):45-52
Date
2016
Language
Finnish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antibiotics, Antineoplastic - adverse effects
Antineoplastic Agents - adverse effects
Finland
Humans
Immunotherapy - adverse effects
Interferons - adverse effects
Melanoma - drug therapy - immunology
Abstract
Conventional anticancer drugs, cytotoxic agents, function by killing all rapidly dividing cells without distinguishing between cancer cells and normal cells of the body. Understanding of the regulatory mechanisms of the immune system has enabled the development of immunotherapeutic drugs and, through them, liberation of the immune response for the management of cancer. In Finland, interferons and antibody therapies represent the clinically applied immunotherapy of melanoma. While most antibody therapies are fairly harmless, the new drugs enhancing T cell defense are associated with a significant risk of autoimmune adverse effects. Immediate recognition and treatment of adverse effects are essential for the survival of the patients.
PubMed ID
27044180 View in PubMed
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An antigen related to the phenotype of multi-drug resistance can be induced in vivo and used as a target for immunotherapy of rat leukemia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature26677
Source
Leuk Res. 1985;9(8):987-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
1985
Author
A. Brox
G. Price
A K Sullivan
Source
Leuk Res. 1985;9(8):987-92
Date
1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antibodies, Monoclonal
Antigens, Neoplasm - biosynthesis
Cytotoxicity, Immunologic
Daunorubicin - therapeutic use
Disease Models, Animal
Drug resistance
Female
Fluorescent Antibody Technique
Immunization
Immunotherapy
Leukemia, Experimental - therapy
Mice
Mice, Inbred BALB C
Microscopy, Fluorescence
Rats
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Surface Properties
Time Factors
Abstract
Several laboratories have reported that new plasma membrane peptides appear in rodent and human cells after induction of in-vitro resistance to vinca alkaloids, anthracyclines and other anti-neoplastic drugs. Recently, murine monoclonal antibodies have been produced that recognize surface components of such drug-resistant cells. The work presented here describes the development of an in-vivo animal model of this phenomenon using a rat myeloid leukemia. Brown Norway rats were made leukemic with promyelocytes of the BNML line and subsequently were treated with 7.7 mg kg-1 of daunorubicin. After eight cycles of passage-treatment-regrowth, the resulting cells reacted with this antibody in immunofluorescence and cytotoxicity assays. Animals injected with cells that had been pre-incubated with antibody in the absence of complement survived significantly longer than did the controls. Further prolongation of survival occurred when the cells were treated with a second antibody of a different specificity. These results demonstrate that some of the changes associated with in-vitro drug resistance occur also in vivo and potentially may be exploited as a focus for immunotherapy.
PubMed ID
3900592 View in PubMed
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Antigen-based therapy with glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) vaccine in patients with recent-onset type 1 diabetes: a randomised double-blind trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133331
Source
Lancet. 2011 Jul 23;378(9788):319-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-23-2011
Author
Diane K Wherrett
Brian Bundy
Dorothy J Becker
Linda A DiMeglio
Stephen E Gitelman
Robin Goland
Peter A Gottlieb
Carla J Greenbaum
Kevan C Herold
Jennifer B Marks
Roshanak Monzavi
Antoinette Moran
Tihamer Orban
Jerry P Palmer
Philip Raskin
Henry Rodriguez
Desmond Schatz
Darrell M Wilson
Jeffrey P Krischer
Jay S Skyler
Author Affiliation
Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.
Source
Lancet. 2011 Jul 23;378(9788):319-27
Date
Jul-23-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Antigens - immunology - therapeutic use
Autoimmune Diseases - immunology - therapy
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - immunology - therapy
Double-Blind Method
Female
Glutamate Decarboxylase - immunology - therapeutic use
Humans
Immunotherapy, Active
Male
Middle Aged
United States
Young Adult
Abstract
Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) is a major target of the autoimmune response that occurs in type 1 diabetes mellitus. In animal models of autoimmunity, treatment with a target antigen can modulate aggressive autoimmunity. We aimed to assess whether immunisation with GAD formulated with aluminum hydroxide (GAD-alum) would preserve insulin production in recent-onset type 1 diabetes.
Patients aged 3-45 years who had been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes for less than 100 days were enrolled from 15 sites in the USA and Canada, and randomly assigned to receive one of three treatments: three injections of 20 µg GAD-alum, two injections of 20 µg GAD-alum and one of alum, or 3 injections of alum. Injections were given subcutaneously at baseline, 4 weeks later, and 8 weeks after the second injection. The randomisation sequence was computer generated at the TrialNet coordinating centre. Patients and study personnel were masked to treatment assignment. The primary outcome was the baseline-adjusted geometric mean area under the curve (AUC) of serum C-peptide during the first 2 h of a 4-h mixed meal tolerance test at 1 year. Secondary outcomes included changes in glycated haemoglobin A(1c) (HbA(1c)) and insulin dose, and safety. Analysis included all randomised patients with known measurements. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00529399.
145 patients were enrolled and treated with GAD-alum (n=48), GAD-alum plus alum (n=49), or alum (n=48). At 1 year, the 2-h AUC of C-peptide, adjusted for age, sex, and baseline C-peptide value, was 0
412 nmol/L (95% CI 0
349-0
478) in the GAD-alum group, 0
382 nmol/L (0
322-0
446) in the GAD-alum plus alum group, and 0
413 nmol/L (0
351-0
477) in the alum group. The ratio of the population mean of the adjusted geometric mean 2-h AUC of C-peptide was 0
998 (95% CI 0
779-1
22; p=0
98) for GAD-alum versus alum, and 0
926 (0
720-1
13; p=0
50) for GAD-alum plus alum versus alum. HbA(1c), insulin use, and the occurrence and severity of adverse events did not differ between groups.
Antigen-based immunotherapy therapy with two or three doses of subcutaneous GAD-alum across 4-12 weeks does not alter the course of loss of insulin secretion during 1 year in patients with recently diagnosed type 1 diabetes. Although antigen-based therapy is a highly desirable treatment and is effective in animal models, translation to human autoimmune disease remains a challenge.
US National Institutes of Health.
Notes
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Comment In: Lancet. 2011 Jul 23;378(9788):291-221715000
PubMed ID
21714999 View in PubMed
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Asthma mortality in the Danish child population: risk factors and causes of asthma death.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15254
Source
Pediatr Pulmonol. 2003 Aug;36(2):142-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2003
Author
Inger Merete Jørgensen
Vagn B Jensen
Susanne Bülow
Thomas L Dahm
Palle Prahl
Knud Juel
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, Gentofte University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. mejo@fa.dk
Source
Pediatr Pulmonol. 2003 Aug;36(2):142-7
Date
Aug-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Inhalation
Adolescent
Adrenal Cortex Hormones - therapeutic use
Adult
Age Distribution
Age Factors
Allergens - adverse effects
Asthma - drug therapy - mortality
Child
Child, Preschool
Death Certificates
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Hospital Mortality
Humans
Immunotherapy - mortality
Infant
Male
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Seasons
Sex Distribution
Time Factors
Treatment Refusal - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Child death due to asthma is a rare and potentially preventable event. We investigated possible risk factors for death due to asthma in children and adolescents, as a step towards preventing or minimizing asthma death in this age group, and improving asthma management and care. We reviewed all 108 cases of asthma death in 1-19-year-olds in Denmark, 1973-1994. Copies of death certificates, hospital records, information from general practitioners, and autopsy records were obtained. The information was assessed with particular reference to: features and duration of asthma before death; severity of asthma; time and place of death; long-term and ongoing medical treatment; quality of medical care; circumstances of final illness; and medical treatment during the final episode of asthma. Age groups of 1-4 years, 5-14 years, and 15-19 years were analyzed separately and in aggregate. Death occurred predominantly in the 15-19-year age group. Generally, significantly more patients died in the summer. These patients were more atopic, had fewer asthma symptoms, and did not have regular asthma consultations. Nearly all patients had early-onset asthma. The 1-4-year age group was characterized by severe asthma. Major risk factors (all age groups) were: gradual deterioration during the last month; length of final attack (>3 hr); and delay in seeking medical help during the final attack. None of the children died during their first attack. Nonadherence was most frequent among the 15-19-year-olds. All asthmatic children and young adults should regularly receive medical care and assessment, even if they suffer only a few symptoms. This study underlines the need for ongoing education of the patient's family, the patient, and doctors on long-term management and management of acute attacks. Copies of clearly written individual plans for periods with increasing symptoms should be supplied to the patient/family and, where appropriate, to their general practitioners. The object of these measures is that the patient and parents/family learn to recognize the signs of deterioration and to act on them.
PubMed ID
12833494 View in PubMed
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119 records – page 1 of 12.