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5-oxo-ETE induces pulmonary eosinophilia in an integrin-dependent manner in Brown Norway rats.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10761
Source
J Clin Invest. 1998 Dec 15;102(12):2165-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-15-1998
Author
P. Stamatiou
Q. Hamid
R. Taha
W. Yu
T B Issekutz
J. Rokach
S P Khanapure
W S Powell
Author Affiliation
Meakins-Christie Laboratories, Department of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, H2X 2P2.
Source
J Clin Invest. 1998 Dec 15;102(12):2165-72
Date
Dec-15-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antibodies, Monoclonal - pharmacology
Antigens, CD - metabolism
Arachidonic Acids - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Chemotactic Factors - pharmacology
Immunohistochemistry
Integrin alpha4
Integrins - metabolism
Intubation, Intratracheal - methods
Leukotrienes - pharmacology
Lung - cytology - drug effects
Macrophage-1 Antigen - metabolism
Male
Platelet Activating Factor - pharmacology
Pulmonary Eosinophilia - chemically induced
Rats
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Time Factors
Abstract
We have shown previously that the 5-lipoxygenase product 5-oxo-6,8, 11,14-eicosatetraenoic acid (5-oxo-ETE) is a highly potent eosinophil chemoattractant in vitro. To determine whether this substance can induce pulmonary eosinophil infiltration in vivo, it was administered to Brown Norway rats by tracheal insufflation. Eosinophils were then counted in lung sections that had been immunostained with an antibody to eosinophil major basic protein. 5-Oxo-ETE induced a dramatic increase in the numbers of eosinophils (ED50, 2.5 microg) around the walls of the airways, which reached maximal levels (five times control levels) between 15 and 24 h after administration, and then declined. LTB4 also induced pulmonary eosinophil infiltration with a similar ED50 but appeared to be somewhat less effective. In contrast, LTD4 and LTE4 were inactive. 5-Oxo-ETE-induced eosinophilia was unaffected by the LTB4 and PAF antagonists LY255283 and WEB 2170, respectively. However, it was inhibited by approximately 75% by monoclonal antibodies to CD49d (VLA-4) or CD11a (LFA-1) but was not significantly affected by an antibody to CD11b (Mac-1). In conclusion, 5-oxo-ETE induces pulmonary eosinophilia in Brown Norway rats, raising the possibility that it may be a physiological mediator of inflammation in asthma.
PubMed ID
9854052 View in PubMed
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8-Hydroxydeoxyguanosine: a new potential independent prognostic factor in breast cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97933
Source
Br J Cancer. 2010 Mar 16;102(6):1018-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-16-2010
Author
H. Sova
A. Jukkola-Vuorinen
U. Puistola
S. Kauppila
P. Karihtala
Author Affiliation
Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, Oulu University Hospital, Finland. henrijuh@mail.student.oulu.fi
Source
Br J Cancer. 2010 Mar 16;102(6):1018-23
Date
Mar-16-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis - metabolism - mortality - pathology
Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast - diagnosis - metabolism - mortality - pathology
Deoxyguanosine - analogs & derivatives - blood - metabolism
Female
Humans
Immunohistochemistry
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Staging
Prognosis
Survival Analysis
Tumor Markers, Biological - analysis - metabolism
Abstract
BACKGROUND: 8-Hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) is the commonly used marker of oxidative stress-derived DNA damage. 8-OxodG formation is regulated by local antioxidant capacity and DNA repair enzyme activity. Earlier studies have reported contradictory data on the function of 8-oxodG as a prognostic factor in different cancer types. METHODS: We assessed pre-operative serum 8-oxodG levels with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in a well-defined series of 173 breast cancer patients. 8-OxodG expression in the nuclei of cancer cells from 150 of these patients was examined by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: The serum 8-oxodG levels and immunohistochemical 8-oxodG expression were in concordance with each other (P
PubMed ID
20179711 View in PubMed
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[10 years of testing of the HER2 status in breast cancer in Russia].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116989
Source
Arkh Patol. 2012 Sep-Oct;74(5):3-6
Publication Type
Article

17beta-estradiol induces the proliferation of the in vitro cultured human urothelium.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89268
Source
Scand J Urol Nephrol. 2009;43(3):179-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Koskela Sanna
Lehtonen Siri
Santala Markku
Venhola Mika
Parpala-Spårman Teija
Lehenkari Petri
Author Affiliation
Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland. sannako@paju.oulu.fi
Source
Scand J Urol Nephrol. 2009;43(3):179-85
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Blotting, Western
Cell Nucleus - metabolism
Cell Proliferation - drug effects
Cells, Cultured
Child
Child, Preschool
Cytoplasm - metabolism
Estradiol - pharmacology
Female
Humans
Immunohistochemistry
Keratin-7 - metabolism
Male
Middle Aged
Urothelium - cytology
Young Adult
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The genitourinary tract is considered to be a target for the actions of sex steroid hormones. Decreased ovarian function and lack of estrogen after menopause are associated with lower genitourinary tract symptoms as well as bladder dysfunctions such as incontinence. Estrogen may also affect urothelial cells. The estrogen receptors (ERs) are found in the mucosa of the urinary tract. The purpose of this study was to culture human urothelial cells (HUCs) originating from urothelial tissue biopsies and to use them as a reproducible test platform to evaluate the effect of 17beta-estradiol (E2). MATERIAL AND METHODS: Urothelial tissue biopsies were obtained from 95 patients undergoing gynaecological open surgery for urinary incontinence, paediatric vesicoureteral reflux or transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) for benign prostatic hyperplasia. HUCs originating from biopsies were cultured in vitro in the absence or in the presence of 0.1 nmol, 0.01 micromol and 1 micromol of E2. ER expression of the cultured HUCs was examined by Western analysis and immunofluorescence microscopy, which was also used for HUC characterization. The effect of E2 in the proliferation of the HUCs was determined by tetrazolium salt 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT)-assay. RESULTS: HUCs were cultured successfully in four to six passages but there was variation between samples. The cultured cells showed expression of beta(4)-integrin, E-cadherin and cytokeratins 7, 8, 9 and 19, indicating the epithelial origin of the cells. Both types of ERs, ERalpha and ERbeta, were found in the in vitro cultured HUCs. E2 treatment of HUCs did not affect remarkably the expression of ERalpha but cell proliferation was induced. However, no concentration-dependent effect was seen. CONCLUSIONS: This study indicates that HUCs originating from small tissue biopsies can be cultured in several passages in vitro and could have potential in repairing or restoring urinary tract tissue by tissue engineering therapy. HUCs serve as a good in vitro test platform, as shown by analysing E2-treated HUCs. E2 induced the proliferation of cultured HUCs even though concentration dependency was not observed. The findings of this study may have relevance in determining the mechanisms of estrogen therapy in postmenopausal urinary tract symptoms and in the future development of tissue engineering technology.
PubMed ID
19384677 View in PubMed
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17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 is an independent prognostic marker in breast cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17431
Source
Cancer Res. 2004 Oct 15;64(20):7604-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-15-2004
Author
Olayiwola O Oduwole
Yan Li
Veli V Isomaa
Anne Mäntyniemi
Anitta E Pulkka
Ylermi Soini
Pirkko T Vihko
Author Affiliation
Biocenter Oulu and Research Center for Molecular Endocrinology, WHO Collaborating Centre for Research on Reproductive Health, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Cancer Res. 2004 Oct 15;64(20):7604-9
Date
Oct-15-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
17-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenases - biosynthesis - genetics
Breast Neoplasms - enzymology - genetics - metabolism - pathology
Estrogen Receptor alpha - biosynthesis - genetics
Estrogen Receptor beta - biosynthesis - genetics
Female
Humans
Immunohistochemistry
In Situ Hybridization
Isoenzymes
Ki-67 Antigen - biosynthesis - genetics
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Staging
Paraffin Embedding
Prognosis
RNA, Messenger - biosynthesis - genetics
Receptor, erbB-2 - biosynthesis - genetics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Tumor Markers, Biological - biosynthesis - genetics
Abstract
Estrogens have an important role in the development and progression of breast cancer. 17beta-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (17HSD1), type 2 (17HSD2), and type 5 (17HSD5) are associated with sex steroid metabolism in normal and cancerous breast tissue. The mRNA expressions of the 17HSD1, 17HSD2, and 17HSD5 enzymes were analyzed in 794 breast carcinoma specimens by using tissue microarrays and normal histologic sections. The results were correlated with the estrogen receptor alpha (ER-alpha) and beta (ER-beta), progesterone receptor, Ki67, and c-erbB-2 expressions analyzed by immunohistochemical techniques and with the Tumor-Node-Metastasis classification, tumor grade, disease-free interval, and survival of the patients. Signals for 17HSD1 mRNA were detected in 16%, 17HSD2 in 25%, and 17HSD5 in 65% of the breast cancer specimens. No association between the 17HSD1, 17HSD2, and 17HSD5 expressions was detected. A significant association was observed between ER-alpha and ER-beta (P = 0.02; odds ratio, 1.96) expressions. There was also a significant inverse association between ER-alpha and 17HSD1 (P = 0.04; odds ratio, 0.53), as well as ER-alpha and 17HSD5 (P = 0.001; odds ratio, 0.35). Patients with tumors expressing 17HSD1 mRNA or protein had significantly shorter overall and disease-free survival than the other patients (P = 0.0010 and 0.0134, log rank). The expression of 17HSD5 was significantly higher in breast tumor specimens than in normal tissue (P = 0.033; odds ratio, 5.56). The group with 17HSD5 overexpression had a worse prognosis than the other patients (P = 0.0146). ER-alpha also associated with survival (P = 0.045). Cox multivariate analyses showed that 17HSD1 mRNA, tumor size, and ER-alpha had independent prognostic significance.
PubMed ID
15492288 View in PubMed
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Aberrant expression of E-cadherin and beta-catenin in association with transforming growth factor-beta1 in urinary bladder lesions in humans after the Chernobyl accident.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16573
Source
Cancer Sci. 2006 Jan;97(1):45-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2006
Author
Alina Romanenko
Keiichirou Morimura
Anna Kinoshita
Hideki Wanibuchi
Alexander Vozianov
Shoji Fukushima
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, Institute of Urology, Academy of Medical Sciences of Ukraine, 9a, Yu. Kotzubinsky Street, 04053, Kiev, Ukraine.
Source
Cancer Sci. 2006 Jan;97(1):45-50
Date
Jan-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bladder Neoplasms - metabolism - pathology
Cadherins - metabolism
Chernobyl Nuclear Accident
Female
Gene Expression Regulation
Humans
Immunohistochemistry
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Transforming Growth Factor beta - metabolism
beta Catenin - metabolism
Abstract
This study examines the molecular pathways of cell-cell communication in chronic inflammatory processes associated with long-term low-dose urinary bladder exposure to ionizing radiation in people without major disease living more than 19 years in radio-contaminated areas of Ukraine after the Chernobyl accident. Patterns of components of the E-cadherin/beta-catenin complex, and transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression were immunohistochemically evaluated in urinary bladder biopsies from 52 males with benign prostate hyperplasia and 8 females with chronic cystitis (group 1). For comparison, 25 males and 6 females living in non-contaminated areas of Ukraine were also investigated (group 2). Fourteen patients with primary urothelial carcinomas, which were operated on before the Chernobyl accident, were included as a carcinoma group. Chronic proliferative atypical cystitis ('Chernobyl cystitis') was observed in group 1 patients. Foci of dysplasia and carcinoma in situ were found in 51 (85%) and 34 (57%) of the 60 cases, respectively. Chronic cystitis with areas of dysplasia was detected in only 4 (13%) cases of 31 group 2 patients. Statistically significant differences in immunohistochemical scores for TGF-beta1 in the urothelium and lamina propria, iNOS in the urothelium and both beta-catenin and E-cadherin in the cytoplasm were observed between groups 1 and 2 with marked expression in group 1. Furthermore, TGF-beta1 overexpression and alteration in E-cadherin/beta-catenin complexes in bladder urothelium might play a crucial role in urinary bladder carcinogenesis in humans exposed to long-term low-dose ionizing radiation.
PubMed ID
16367920 View in PubMed
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Aberrant expression of the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 oncogene is not a common feature in osteosarcoma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101871
Source
Hum Pathol. 2011 Jun;42(6):859-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Daniel Baumhoer
Jan Smida
Katja Specht
Karin Bink
Leticia Quintanilla-Martinez
Michael Rosemann
Heide Siggelkow
Walter B J Nathrath
Michael J Atkinson
Stefan Bielack
Gernot Jundt
Michaela Nathrath
Author Affiliation
Institute of Pathology, University Hospital Basel, 4031 Basel, Switzerland. dbaumhoer@mac.com
Source
Hum Pathol. 2011 Jun;42(6):859-66
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Bone Neoplasms - genetics - metabolism - pathology
Child
Child, Preschool
DNA, Neoplasm - analysis
Female
Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic - physiology
Humans
Immunohistochemistry
In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence
Male
Middle Aged
Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis
Osteosarcoma - genetics - metabolism - pathology
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Prognosis
RNA, Messenger - metabolism
Receptor, erbB-2 - genetics - metabolism
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Tumor Markers, Biological - genetics - metabolism
Young Adult
Abstract
Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 expression in osteosarcoma and its relationship to prognosis have been the subject of several conflicting reports, most of them relying on immunohistochemical studies. Because the urgent need of prognostic markers and effective new treatment options for osteosarcoma patients, we evaluated the role of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 in 2 well-characterized sets of pretherapeutic osteosarcoma samples (46 paraffin-embedded and 46 fresh-frozen biopsy samples) using immunohistochemistry with 2 different antibodies [DAKO A0485 (Glostrup, Denmark) and Novocastra CB11 (Newcastle, UK)] as well as fluorescence in situ hybridization, real-time polymerase chain reaction, and SNP array analyses and correlated our findings with clinicopathological parameters. However, our study failed to detect unequivocal evidence of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 gene amplification or overexpression of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 messenger RNA or protein in any of the investigated tumors. Only in a small subset of samples, a moderate increase in messenger RNA levels (13.6%) or focal membranous immunoreactivity (8.7%; A0485) was detected but did not correlate with survival or response to chemotherapy. Cytoplasmic staining was identified more frequently (63%; CB11) but again did not show any association with clinicopathological parameters. In conclusion, our study does not support a role for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 as a prognostic marker in osteosarcoma.
PubMed ID
21292304 View in PubMed
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Aberrant type I and type III collagen gene expression in human breast cancer in vivo.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21082
Source
J Pathol. 1998 Nov;186(3):262-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1998
Author
S. Kauppila
F. Stenbäck
J. Risteli
A. Jukkola
L. Risteli
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Biochemistry, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
J Pathol. 1998 Nov;186(3):262-8
Date
Nov-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast - chemistry
Breast Neoplasms - metabolism - pathology
Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast - metabolism - pathology
Female
Fibroadenoma - metabolism - pathology
Humans
Immunohistochemistry
In Situ Hybridization
Mucins - genetics
Peptide Fragments - genetics
Procollagen - genetics
RNA, Messenger - analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Tumor Markers, Biological - analysis
Abstract
Increased synthesis and degradation of extracellular matrix components are associated with breast cancer development. This study evaluated type I and type III procollagen mRNA expression and the corresponding protein synthesis and maturation, as well as the tissue distribution of these collagens, in benign breast lesions, infiltrating ductal carcinomas, and their metastases by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. In the benign lesions, the type I and type III collagen bundles were regularly organized and the expression of the corresponding mRNA was weak, indicating a relatively slow collagen turnover. In the malignant tumours, increased expression of type I and type III procollagen mRNAs was observed in the fibroblastic cells of the stroma; the malignant epithelial cells did not participate. The staining of corresponding newly-synthesized pN-collagens showed aberrant bundles in the invasive front of the malignant tumours. Newly-synthesized type I and type III procollagens were occasionally observed in fibroblastic cells, particularly in grade 2 and grade 3 tumours. Metastases of breast carcinoma resembled poorly differentiated primary tumours with respect to their collagen synthesis and deposition. The increased synthesis of fibrillar type I and type III procollagens may serve as a pathway for tumour invasion. The enhanced synthesis is associated with the formation of aberrant collagen bundles, which may be more readily degradable and may thus facilitate breast tumour invasion.
PubMed ID
10211114 View in PubMed
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The absence of immunoreactivity for tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1), but not for TIMP-2, protein is associated with a favorable prognosis in aggressive breast carcinoma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16897
Source
Oncology. 2005;68(2-3):196-203
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Paula Kuvaja
Anne Talvensaari-Mattila
Paavo Pääkkö
Taina Turpeenniemi-Hujanen
Author Affiliation
Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Oncology. 2005;68(2-3):196-203
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Breast Neoplasms - enzymology - pathology
Carcinoma - enzymology - pathology
Disease Progression
Female
Gene Expression Regulation, Enzymologic
Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic
Humans
Immunohistochemistry
Middle Aged
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Survival Analysis
Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-1 - analysis - immunology
Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-2 - analysis - immunology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: High tumor grade and lymph node positivity are associated with poor prognosis in breast carcinoma. Prognostic markers are used to define which patient groups benefit from different treatment modalities, some of which are potentially very toxic. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) degrade the extracellular matrix, and type IV collagenases MMP-2 and -9 have been linked to invasive behavior of several malignancies. Tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) -1 and -2 inhibit their activity and are therefore considered to have an inhibitory effect on tumor progression. The role of TIMPs in progression of breast carcinoma is, however, still poorly known. Here the effect of TIMP-1 and -2 on survival was examined in lymph node-positive breast carcinoma patients. METHODS: TIMP-1 or -2 was evaluated with avidin-biotin immunohistochemical staining from paraffin-embedded sections of primary breast carcinoma of 132 cases. RESULTS: Positive staining for TIMP-1 and -2 was observed in 81 and 84% of the tumors respectively. TIMP-1 correlated to the grade of the tumor (p = 0.047). Absence of TIMP-1 protein correlated with favorable disease-specific survival of the patients with high-grade tumors. After 10 years of follow-up as high as 88% of patients with a grade 2-3, but TIMP-1-negative tumor were alive, when only 61% of the TIMP-1-positive cases in this group survived by that time (p = 0.03). CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that lack of TIMP-1 protein expression is associated with a favorable prognosis in patients with node-positive high-grade breast carcinoma.
PubMed ID
16006757 View in PubMed
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Abundance of the longer A beta 42 in neocortical and cerebrovascular amyloid beta deposits in Swedish familial Alzheimer's disease and Down's syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211852
Source
Neuroreport. 1996 May 31;7(8):1377-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-31-1996
Author
R N Kalaria
D L Cohen
B D Greenberg
M J Savage
N E Bogdanovic
B. Winblad
L. Lannfelt
A. Adem
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA.
Source
Neuroreport. 1996 May 31;7(8):1377-81
Date
May-31-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - genetics - metabolism
Amyloid beta-Peptides - analysis - genetics
Amyloid beta-Protein Precursor - genetics
Cerebral Cortex - chemistry
Cerebrovascular Circulation - physiology
Down Syndrome - genetics - metabolism
Humans
Immunohistochemistry
Middle Aged
Mutation
Nerve Tissue Proteins - analysis - genetics
Periodicity
Sweden
Abstract
Recent studies have demonstrated the deposition of amyloid beta (A beta) protein with carboxyl- and aminoterminal heterogeneity in cortical and cerebrovascular deposits of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Using carboxyl end-terminal specific antibodies to A beta peptides, we examined the immunocytochemical distribution of A beta 40 and A beta 42 species in brain tissue from a Swedish subject with familial AD (FAD) bearing the double mutation at codons 670/671 in the amyloid beta precursor protein (A beta PP), and from subjects with Down's syndrome and sporadic AD. In the Swedish subject, we found profound parenchymal A beta deposits and cerebral amyloid angiopathy in all four cortical lobes and cerebellum. A beta 42 was evident in almost all parenchymal deposits as well as many vascular deposits. Although A beta 40 was present in meningeal and intraparenchymal vessels, deposits containing this shorter peptide reactivity were sparse. Surprisingly, our observations in Swedish FAD showing a remarkable abundance of A beta 42 in both parenchymal and vascular deposits were qualitatively similar to the Down's syndrome and most sporadic AD cases, and to previously published A beta PP717 FAD. While previous transfection studies in different cell cultures indicate substantially increased soluble A beta production and A beta 40 species to be predominant, it would appear that the double A beta PP mutations in Swedish FAD largely result in the deposition of the longer A beta 42 in vivo.
PubMed ID
8856679 View in PubMed
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778 records – page 1 of 78.