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Activation of maternal Epstein-Barr virus infection and risk of acute leukemia in the offspring.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80490
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2007 Jan 15;165(2):134-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-15-2007
Author
Tedeschi Rosamaria
Bloigu Aini
Ogmundsdottir Helga M
Marus Alessia
Dillner Joakim
dePaoli Paolo
Gudnadottir Margret
Koskela Pentti
Pukkala Eero
Lehtinen Tuula
Lehtinen Matti
Author Affiliation
Department of Microbiology, Oncological Center, Aviano, Italy.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2007 Jan 15;165(2):134-7
Date
Jan-15-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Antibodies, Anti-Idiotypic - immunology
Antigens, Viral - immunology
Capsid Proteins - immunology
Child
Child, Preschool
Epstein-Barr Virus Infections - complications - epidemiology - virology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Herpesvirus 4, Human - immunology
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Immunoglobulin G - immunology
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute - epidemiology - etiology - virology
Maternal Exposure
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Time Factors
Abstract
After identifying an association between maternal Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) reactivation and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the authors analyzed a nested case-control study within Finnish and Icelandic maternity cohorts with 7 million years of follow-up to confirm EBV's role in ALL. Offspring of 550,000 mothers were followed up to age 15 years during 1975-1997 by national cancer registries to identify leukemia cases. Mothers of cases and three quarters of matched mothers of controls were identified by national population registers. First-trimester sera from mothers of 304 ALL cases and 39 non-ALL cases and from 943 mothers of controls were analyzed for antibodies to viral capsid antigen, early antigen, and EBV transactivator protein ZEBRA. Relative risk, estimated as odds ratio (95% confidence interval), was adjusted for birth order and sibship size. Combining early antigen and/or ZEBRA immunoglobulin G antibodies with the presence of viral capsid antigen immunoglobulin M antibodies did not increase the estimate for ALL risk for viral capsid antigen immunoglobulin M alone (odds ratio = 1.9, 95% confidence interval: 1.2, 3.0). Both ZEBRA immunoglobulin G antibodies and viral capsid antigen immunoglobulin M antibodies were associated with an increased risk of non-ALL in the offspring (odds ratio = 4.5, 95% confidence interval: 1.3, 16; odds ratio = 5.6, 95% confidence interval: 1.1, 29, respectively), suggesting EBV reactivation in the mothers of non-ALL cases. EBV reactivation may be associated with a proportion of childhood leukemia.
PubMed ID
17005627 View in PubMed
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Age-related dystrophin-glycoprotein complex structure and function in the rat extensor digitorum longus and soleus muscle.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79421
Source
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2006 Nov;61(11):1119-29
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
Rice Kevin M
Preston Deborah L
Neff David
Norton Michael
Blough Eric R
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Molecular Physiology, Suite 311, Science Building, Department of Biological Sciences, 1 John Marshall Drive, Marshall University, Huntington, WV 25755-1090, USA.
Source
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2006 Nov;61(11):1119-29
Date
Nov-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging - physiology
Animals
Antibodies - metabolism
Dystroglycans - metabolism
Dystrophin - metabolism
Dystrophin-Associated Protein Complex - physiology
Immunoblotting
Immunoglobulin G - immunology
Muscle Contraction - physiology
Muscle Fibers - metabolism - pathology
Muscle, Skeletal - metabolism - pathology
Rats
Sarcoglycans - metabolism
Abstract
This study tested the hypothesis that age-related changes in the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC) may precede age-associated alterations in muscle morphology and function. Compared to those in adult (6 month) rats, extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and soleus muscle mass was decreased in old (30 month) and very old (36 month) Fischer 344/NNiaHSD x Brown Norway/BiNia rats. The amount of dystrophin, beta-dystroglycan, and alpha-sarcoglycan increased with aging in the EDL and decreased with aging in the soleus. alpha-Dystroglycan levels were increased with aging in both muscles and displayed evidence of altered glycosylation. Immunostaining for the presence of antibody infiltration and dystrophin following increased muscle stretch suggested that the aging in the soleus was characterized by diminished membrane integrity. Together, these data suggest that aging is associated with alterations in EDL and soleus DGC protein content and localization. These results may implicate the DGC as playing a role in age-associated skeletal muscle remodeling.
PubMed ID
17167152 View in PubMed
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Allergenic and immunogenic components of house dust mite, Dermatophagoides farinae.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3845
Source
Ann Allergy. 1986 Feb;56(2):150-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1986
Author
S. Nakada
M. Haida
T. Nakagawa
K. Ito
T. Miyamoto
Source
Ann Allergy. 1986 Feb;56(2):150-5
Date
Feb-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Allergens
Animals
Antibodies, Anti-Idiotypic - analysis
Asthma - blood - immunology
Chromatography, Gel
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Humans
Immunoglobulin G - immunology
Mice
Mice, Inbred BALB C
Mites - immunology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Skin Tests
Tissue Extracts - isolation & purification
Abstract
The house dust mite, Dermatophagoides farinae, was fractionated by a Sephadex G-200 column. Its allergenic (IgE-reacting) and immunogenic (IgG-reacting) components were investigated. By means of skin test, the molecular weight (MW) of major allergenic components of mite was found to be approximately 9,000 to 21,000 daltons. Immunogenic components were investigated by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay using each fraction as an antigen and mice plasma and human serum as antibodies. With mouse plasma, high IgG antibody titers were observed in fractions that contained the part of the mite with high MW (greater than 150,000). With human sera, high IgG antibody titers were observed in fractions that contained the part of the mite with MW more than 30,000. Heterogeneity of human IgG antibody responses against mite antigen was also suggested.
PubMed ID
3484919 View in PubMed
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Analysis of clinical experience of using formula nutrilon for bottle feeding of the first year of life in Ukraine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93319
Source
Georgian Med News. 2008 Mar;(156):40-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Niankovskii S.
Ivakhnenko O.
Author Affiliation
Danylo Halytskiy Lviv National Medical University, Department of Faculty and Hospital Pediatrics, Lviv, Ukraine.
Source
Georgian Med News. 2008 Mar;(156):40-6
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bottle Feeding - statistics & numerical data
Energy intake
Humans
Immunoglobulin A - immunology
Immunoglobulin G - immunology
Infant
Infant Formula - statistics & numerical data
Ukraine - epidemiology
Abstract
The article describes some current issues of bottle feeding of first year children. Human milk oligosaccharides play an important role in postnatal development of the intestinal flora and development of protective functions of child's organism. Dietary modulation of the intestinal microflora and immune response is one of the important problems in the nutritional sciences today. The present review summarizes the data of experimental research and clinical studies concerning the possible effects of probiotic mixture of galacto-oligosaccharides and fructo-oligosaccharides in Ukraine. The data demonstrate that prebiotic oligosaccharides such as studied mixture provide beneficial effects for formula-fed infants. The results from several studies in Ukraine demonstrate that probiotic oligosaccharides stimulate the growth of bifidobacteria and lactobacilli, reduce the growth of pathogens, decrease faecal pH, normalize the stool consistency and modulate immune system as human milk does.
PubMed ID
18403808 View in PubMed
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Antibodies against human papillomavirus type 6 capsids are elevated in men with previous condylomas.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207214
Source
APMIS. 1997 Nov;105(11):884-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1997
Author
A. Wikström
C. Eklund
G. von Krogh
P. Lidbrink
J. Dillner
Author Affiliation
Microbiology & Tumorbiology Center. Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
APMIS. 1997 Nov;105(11):884-8
Date
Nov-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antibodies, Viral - immunology
Capsid - immunology
Condylomata Acuminata - immunology - virology
Humans
Immunoglobulin G - immunology
Male
Papillomaviridae - immunology
Sweden
Abstract
Serum samples from 47 men with current condylomas, 32 men with a history of condylomas and from 205 men with no history of genital wart disease, who were attending sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinics at two different hospitals in Stockholm, were analyzed for the presence of immunoglobulin G (IgG) and A (IgA) antibodies to capsids of human papillomavirus types 6 and 11. IgG to HPV type 6 was found among 35% of patients with a history of condylomas compared to 10% of controls (p = 0.0003), but only among 27% of patients with current condylomas. Antibodies to HPV 6 and to HPV 11 showed a very limited correlation, suggesting that the antibodies are HPV-type restricted. The results strengthen conclusions from a previous serological study indicating that IgG antibodies against HPV 6 develop late during condylomatous disease and mostly reflect previous exposure to the virus.
PubMed ID
9393560 View in PubMed
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Anti-interferon autoantibodies in autoimmune polyendocrinopathy syndrome type 1.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81808
Source
PLoS Med. 2006 Jul;3(7):e289
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2006
Author
Meager Anthony
Visvalingam Kumuthini
Peterson Pärt
Möll Kaidi
Murumägi Astrid
Krohn Kai
Eskelin Petra
Perheentupa Jaakko
Husebye Eystein
Kadota Yoshihisa
Willcox Nick
Author Affiliation
Biotherapeutics, National Institute for Biological Standards and Control, South Mimms, United Kingdom. ameager@nibsc.ac.uk
Source
PLoS Med. 2006 Jul;3(7):e289
Date
Jul-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alopecia - etiology - immunology
Antibody Specificity
Antigen Presentation
Autoantibodies - blood - immunology
Autoimmunity - immunology
Candidiasis, Chronic Mucocutaneous - etiology - immunology
Cell Line, Tumor
Child, Preschool
Dendritic Cells - immunology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Genotype
HLA Antigens - immunology
Humans
Immunoglobulin G - immunology
Interferon Type I - immunology
Interferon-alpha - immunology
Interferons - classification - immunology - physiology
Interleukins - immunology
Keratoconjunctivitis - etiology - immunology
Lymphocyte Subsets - immunology
Lymphoid Tissue - immunology - pathology
Male
Middle Aged
Myasthenia Gravis - etiology - immunology
Neutralization Tests
Norway - epidemiology
Polyendocrinopathies, Autoimmune - diagnosis - epidemiology - genetics - immunology
Self Tolerance - genetics - immunology
Thymoma - complications - immunology
Thymus Gland - immunology - ultrastructure
Thymus Neoplasms - complications - immunology
Tonsil - immunology
Transcription Factors - deficiency - genetics
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene influences thymic self-tolerance induction. In autoimmune polyendocrinopathy syndrome type 1 (APS1; OMIM 240300), recessive AIRE mutations lead to autoimmunity targetting endocrine and other epithelial tissues, although chronic candidiasis usually appears first. Autoimmunity and chronic candidiasis can associate with thymomas as well. Patients with these tumours frequently also have high titre immunoglobulin G autoantibodies neutralising type I interferon (IFN)-alpha and IFN-omega, which are secreted signalling proteins of the cytokine superfamily involved in both innate and adaptive immunity. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We tested for serum autoantibodies to type I IFNs and other immunoregulatory cytokines using specific binding and neutralisation assays. Unexpectedly, in 60/60 Finnish and 16/16 Norwegian APS1 patients with both AIRE alleles mutated, we found high titre neutralising immunoglobulin G autoantibodies to most IFN-alpha subtypes and especially IFN-omega (60% homologous to IFN-alpha)-mostly in the earliest samples. We found lower titres against IFN-beta (30% homologous to IFN-alpha) in 23% of patients; two-thirds of these (from Finland only) also had low titres against the distantly related "type III IFN" (IFN-lambda1; alias interleukin-29). However, autoantibodies to the unrelated type II IFN, IFN-gamma, and other immunoregulatory cytokines, such as interleukin-10 and interleukin-12, were much rarer and did not neutralise. Neutralising titres against type I IFNs averaged even higher in patients with APS1 than in patients with thymomas. Anti-type I IFN autoantibodies preceded overt candidiasis (and several of the autoimmune disorders) in the informative patients, and persisted for decades thereafter. They were undetectable in unaffected heterozygous relatives of APS1 probands (except for low titres against IFN-lambda1), in APS2 patients, and in isolated cases of the endocrine diseases most typical of APS1, so they appear to be APS1-specific. Looking for potentially autoimmunising cell types, we found numerous IFN-alpha(+) antigen-presenting cells-plus strong evidence of local IFN secretion-in the normal thymic medulla (where AIRE expression is strongest), and also in normal germinal centres, where it could perpetuate these autoantibody responses once initiated. IFN-alpha2 and IFN-alpha8 transcripts were also more abundant in antigen-presenting cells cultured from an APS1 patient's blood than from age-matched healthy controls. CONCLUSIONS: These apparently spontaneous autoantibody responses to IFNs, particularly IFN-alpha and IFN-omega, segregate like a recessive trait; their high "penetrance" is especially remarkable for such a variable condition. Their apparent restriction to APS1 patients implies practical value in the clinic, e.g., in diagnosing unusual or prodromal AIRE-mutant patients with only single components of APS1, and possibly in prognosis if they prove to predict its onset. These autoantibody responses also raise numerous questions, e.g., about the rarity of other infections in APS1. Moreover, there must also be clues to autoimmunising mechanisms/cell types in the hierarchy of preferences for IFN-omega, IFN-alpha8, IFN-alpha2, and IFN-beta and IFN-lambda1.
Notes
Comment In: PLoS Med. 2006 Jul;3(7):e29216756392
PubMed ID
16784312 View in PubMed
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Association between Chlamydia trachomatis antibodies and subfertility in the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966 (NFBC 1966), at the age of 31 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70887
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2004 Oct;132(5):977-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2004
Author
L. Karinen
A. Pouta
A L Hartikainen
A. Bloigu
M. Paldanius
M. Leinonen
P. Saikku
M R Järvelin
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University Hospital of Oulu, 90029 OYS, Finland.
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2004 Oct;132(5):977-84
Date
Oct-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antibodies, Bacterial - analysis
Case-Control Studies
Chlamydia Infections - complications - epidemiology
Chlamydia trachomatis - immunology
Cohort Studies
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Immunoglobulin G - immunology
Infertility, Female - complications - epidemiology
Infertility, Male - complications - epidemiology
Male
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
The objective of this study was to assess the serological association between previous Chlamydia trachomatis infection and subfertility in a general population sample. A nested case (n = 493)-control (n = 986) study in a population-based birth cohort consisting of 12,058 live births from the year 1966 was conducted. The analysis was restricted to those 6007 cohort members who replied to a postal inquiry and participated in a health examination including blood samples at the age of 31 years. The presence of C. trachomatis-specific serum IgG antibodies was screened by a synthetic peptide-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. All the positive sera were further tested by the microimmunofluorescence method using immunotype pools and individual immunotypes of C. trachomatis as antigens. An association was found between the detection of immunotype-specific C. trachomatis antibodies and subfertility both in men and women. The results of the present study confirm the serological association between past C. trachomatis infections and subfertility in male or female partners of the couple in the population-based sample.
PubMed ID
15473162 View in PubMed
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Association of Helicobacter pylori IgA antibodies with the risk of peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171090
Source
World J Gastroenterol. 2005 Nov 21;11(43):6871-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-21-2005
Author
Timo U Kosunen
Kari Seppala
Seppo Sarna
Arpo Aromaa
Paul Knekt
Jarmo Virtamo
Anniina Salomaa-Rasanen
Hilpi Rautelin
Author Affiliation
Department of Bacteriology and Immunology, University of Helsinki, PO Box 21, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland. timo.kosunen@helsinki.fi
Source
World J Gastroenterol. 2005 Nov 21;11(43):6871-4
Date
Nov-21-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antibodies, Bacterial - blood
Antigens, Bacterial - immunology
Finland
Helicobacter Infections - immunology
Helicobacter pylori - immunology
Humans
Immunoglobulin A - blood
Immunoglobulin G - immunology
Middle Aged
Peptic Ulcer - immunology - microbiology
Risk factors
Stomach Neoplasms - immunology - microbiology
Abstract
To compare the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) IgG and IgA antibodies between adult subjects, with defined gastric diseases, non-defined gastric disorders and those representing the population.
Data on H pylori IgG and IgA antibodies, determined by enzyme immunoassay, were analyzed in 3,252 subjects with DGD including 482 patients with gastric ulcer, 882 patients with duodenal ulcer, 1,525 patients with chronic gastritis only and 363 subjects with subsequent gastric cancer, 19,145 patients with NoDg and 4,854 POPUL subjects. The age-adjusted prevalences were calculated for 1- and 20-year age cohorts.
The prevalences of IgG antibodies were equally high (89-96%) in all 20-year age cohorts of the DGD groups, whereas the prevalences of IgG antibodies were lower and increased by age in the POPUL and NoDg groups. The prevalences of IgA antibodies were also higher in the DGD groups; among them CA (84-89%) and GU groups (78-91%) showed significantly higher prevalences than DU (68-77%) and CG patients (59-74%) (OR 2.49, 95%CI 1.86-3.34 between the GU and DU groups). In the CA, GU, and DU groups, the IgA prevalences showed only minor variation according to age, while they increased by age in the CG, POPUL, and NoDg groups (P
PubMed ID
16425400 View in PubMed
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Borrelia burgdorferi antibodies in outdoor and indoor workers in south-west Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195504
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2001;33(2):128-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
M. Werner
P. Nordin
B. Arnholm
B. Elgefors
I. Krantz
Author Affiliation
Department of Infectious Diseases, Bords Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2001;33(2):128-31
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Agriculture
Antibodies, Bacterial - blood
Borrelia burgdorferi Group - immunology
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Female
Forestry
Humans
Immunoglobulin G - immunology
Lyme Disease - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Predictive value of tests
Risk factors
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Two hundred and fifty-three farmers and forest workers and 249 clerks from south-west Sweden were recruited to a cross-sectional seroprevalence study to find out if individuals working outdoors are more prone to acquire Borrelia burgdorferi infection than indoor workers and to find undiagnosed cases of Lyme borreliosis. The participants answered a questionnaire and blood specimens were collected to estimate the prevalence of antibodies to B. burgdorferi in each group. Sera were analysed with an enzyme-linked immunoassay technique to determine IgG antibodies to B. burgdorferi flagellum. The prevalence of B. burgdorferi antibodies was 7.6% in the farmers and forest workers vs. 5.3% in the clerks (adjusted odds ratio [age, sex] = 1.2 [95% confidence interval = 0.5-2.8]). One case of Lyme borreliosis was diagnosed. The positive predictive value of the antibody test was estimated to be 3% in the studied populations. B. burgdorferi infection is of low endemicity in south-west Sweden and is probably not an occupational risk among outdoor workers. Undiagnosed cases of Lyme borreliosis are uncommon. The test used is not acceptable for screening purposes.
PubMed ID
11233848 View in PubMed
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95 records – page 1 of 10.