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455 records – page 1 of 46.

The 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine for invasive pneumococcal disease in Alaska native children: results of a clinical trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120452
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2013 Mar;32(3):257-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013

The 1994 human parvovirus B19 epidemic in Denmark: diagnostic and epidemiological experience.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33617
Source
APMIS. 1998 Sep;106(9):843-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1998
Author
I P Jensen
O. Schou
B F Vestergaard
Author Affiliation
Department of Virology, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
APMIS. 1998 Sep;106(9):843-8
Date
Sep-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Immunoglobulin G - blood
Immunoglobulin M - blood
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Parvoviridae Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology - immunology
Parvovirus B19, Human - immunology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious - diagnosis - epidemiology - immunology
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Sex Distribution
Abstract
In 1994 the first human parvovirus B19 (B19) epidemic to be documented in Denmark was recorded from February 2 to September 30. In total, 10,333 serum samples were tested for specific B19 IgM and IgG antibodies, using IDEIA Parvovirus B19 IgM and IgG kits. The prevalence of B19 IgM positivity was 11% for the whole period and 29% at the peak of the epidemic in week 14, declining from week 39 and onwards to 1-3%. The prevalence of B19 IgG (IgM-negative samples) was 60%, indicating an earlier infection, and the same for men and women. The gender distribution of tested patients was the same at the beginning of the epidemic as at the end of the epidemic and a year after its peak, i.e. 86% of samples were from women and only 14% from men. Age distribution for women was the same for the three periods (median age 34 years). For men the median age was 32 years, 39 years and 31 years, respectively. Only a few samples from children were tested. No change in test pattern was observed during the three periods. Approximately 75% of all samples tested were from women of childbearing age (18-45 years old), suggesting a fear of fetal complications in an actual or future pregnancy, rather than a serological verification of clinical symptoms. From the sparse clinical information that accompanied the serum sample we were not able to demonstrate that women were more likely than men to have a symptomatic B19 infection. With reservations we estimate that 14% of adverse pregnancy outcome is correlated with a B19 infection.
PubMed ID
9808410 View in PubMed
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Absence of human bocavirus from deceased fetuses and their mothers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146525
Source
J Clin Virol. 2010 Feb;47(2):186-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Anita Riipinen
Elina Väisänen
Anne Lahtinen
Riitta Karikoski
Mika Nuutila
Heljä-Marja Surcel
Helena Taskinen
Klaus Hedman
Maria Söderlund-Venermo
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Topeliuksenkatu 41 a A, FIN-00250 Helsinki, Finland. anita.riipinen@ttl.fi
Source
J Clin Virol. 2010 Feb;47(2):186-8
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Spontaneous - etiology
Adolescent
Adult
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Female
Fetal Death - etiology
Fetus - virology
Finland - epidemiology
Heart - virology
Human bocavirus - isolation & purification
Humans
Immunoglobulin G - blood
Immunoglobulin M - blood
Liver - virology
Middle Aged
Parvoviridae Infections - epidemiology - virology
Placenta - virology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious - epidemiology - virology
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Young Adult
Abstract
The human bocavirus (HBoV), a newly discovered parvovirus, is closely related to the bovine parvovirus and the canine minute virus, which are known to cause adverse pregnancy outcomes. Another human parvovirus, B19, can lead to fetal hydrops, miscarriage and intrauterine fetal death (IUFD).
To determine the prevalence of HBoV DNA in aborted fetuses and IUFDs. The HBoV serology of the mothers was also studied.
We retrospectively studied all available fetuses (N=535) autopsied during 7/1992-12/1995, and 1/2003-12/2005 in Helsinki, Finland. All available formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded fetal tissues - placenta, heart and liver - of 120 miscarriages, 169 IUFDs, and 246 induced abortions were studied by quantitative PCR. We also measured the HBoV IgM and IgG antibodies in the corresponding maternal sera (N=462) mostly of the first trimester. The IgM-positive sera underwent HBoV PCR.
None of the fetal tissues harbored HBoV DNA. A total of 97% (448/462) of the mothers were positive for IgG antibodies to HBoV, while only 0.9% (4/462) exhibited HBoV-specific IgM antibodies without viremia or respiratory symptoms. One IgM-positive mother had an unexplained fetal loss.
We did not find HBoV DNA in any of the deceased fetuses. Almost all pregnant women were HBoV-IgG positive.
PubMed ID
20031484 View in PubMed
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Absence of novel human parvovirus (PARV4) in Danish mothers and children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268747
Source
J Clin Virol. 2015 Apr;65:23-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2015
Author
Marie-Louise von Linstow
Vibeke Rosenfeldt
Ellinor Lindberg
Lise Jensen
Lea Hedman
Xuemeng Li
Elina Väisänen
Klaus Hedman
Päivi Norja
Source
J Clin Virol. 2015 Apr;65:23-5
Date
Apr-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Immunoglobulin G - blood
Immunoglobulin M - blood
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Mothers
Parvoviridae Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology - immunology
Parvovirus - immunology
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Population Surveillance
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Abstract
The recently discovered human parvovirus 4 (PARV4) is found most frequently in injection drug users, HIV-positive patients, and in haemophiliacs. Studies from Ghana report the finding of PARV4 in plasma from 2 to 12% of children without acute infection, and in nasal secretions and faecal samples. Studies of PARV4 in children from industrialized countries are few.
We aimed to describe the occurrence of PARV4 in a population-based birth cohort of 228 Danish mothers and their healthy children who previously participated in a study of respiratory tract infections in infancy.
Children were included over a whole calendar year and were monitored through monthly home visits through the first year of life. Plasma samples for the present study were available from 228 mothers, 176 newborns, and 202 12-months-old children. All samples were analysed for the presence of PARV4 antibodies by enzyme immunoassay, and samples with detectable antibodies were in addition studied by real-time PCR.
One (0.4%) of 228 mothers had PARV4 IgG exceeding the cut-off absorbance level and another had borderline IgG reactivity. No mother among these two had an acute infection, as they were IgM and PARV4 DNA negative. All blood samples from newborns and one-year-old children had IgG and IgM reactivity below cut-off.
PARV4 is rare in Danish mothers and infants. Further studies are needed, in both rural and urban settings, to investigate the epidemiology and clinical significance of this novel human parvovirus.
PubMed ID
25766982 View in PubMed
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[A case of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever in the Anapa District, Krasnodar Territory].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140350
Source
Vopr Virusol. 2010 Jul-Aug;55(4):39-40
Publication Type
Article

[Accelerated aging of immune system of the veterans of special risk subdivisions].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160568
Source
Adv Gerontol. 2007;20(1):96-111
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
N V Alishev
A A Vashkevich
B A Drabkin
T M Koroleva
L S Kositskaia
V M Shubik
Source
Adv Gerontol. 2007;20(1):96-111
Date
2007
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aging, Premature - etiology
Antibodies - blood
Autoimmunity
Female
Humans
Immune System - radiation effects
Immunoglobulin G - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - immunology
Nuclear Weapons
Russia
Stress, Psychological - complications
Veterans
Abstract
Long far after nuclear weapons tests the veterans of special risk subdivisions (SRS) had changes of humoral factors of nonspecific protection, concentration of immunoglobulins in blood serum, lymphocytes sensibleness to respiratory viruses, humoral and cellular autoimmune displacements, raise of turmonecrotic factor content. Some of the revealed changes (complement, lysocim, concentration of immunoglobulins) are bound up with elderly age of examined people and their diseases. The other changes (autoimmune displacements, sensibleness to respiratory viruses) can be bound up with nuclear weapons tests. Some immunology changes occur because of radiation and non-radiation factors, a nervous shock being among them. Estimate of autoimmune changes is important for the health characteristic 20-40 years after nuclear tests and possible radiation influence. The role of such changes is significant in a sick rate of the veterans of special risk subdivisions.
PubMed ID
17969593 View in PubMed
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Adoptive transfer of alveolar macrophages abrogates bronchial hyperresponsiveness.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15196
Source
Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol. 2004 Jul;31(1):22-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2004
Author
Eric Careau
Elyse Y Bissonnette
Author Affiliation
Centre de Recherche, Hôpital Laval, Institut universitaire de Cardiologie et de Pneumologie de l'Université Laval, Québec, Canada. eric.careau@crhl.ulaval.ca
Source
Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol. 2004 Jul;31(1):22-7
Date
Jul-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adoptive Transfer
Animals
Asthma - physiopathology
Bronchi - drug effects - immunology - physiopathology
Bronchial Hyperreactivity - genetics - physiopathology - therapy
Bronchial Provocation Tests
Clodronic Acid
Disease Models, Animal
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Drug Resistance - physiology
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - genetics
Immunoglobulin E - blood
Immunoglobulin G - blood
Liposomes
Macrophages, Alveolar - drug effects - immunology - transplantation
Male
Methacholine Chloride - pharmacology
Ovalbumin - immunology
Rats
Rats, Sprague-Dawley
Reaction Time - drug effects - physiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Increasing evidence suggests that alveolar macrophages (AM) are involved in asthma pathogenesis. To better understand the role that these cells play, we investigated the capacity of AM from allergy-resistant rat, Sprague Dawley (SD), to modulate airway hyperresponsiveness of allergy-susceptible rat, Brown Norway (BN). AM of ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized BN rats were eliminated by intratracheal instillation of liposomes containing clodronate. AM from OVA-sensitized SD rats were transferred into AM-depleted BN rats 24 h before allergen challenge. Airway responsiveness to methacholine was measured the following day. Instillation of liposomes containing clodronate in BN rats eliminated 85% AM after 3 d compared with saline liposomes. Methacholine concentration needed to increase lung resistance by 200% (EC200RL) was significantly lower in OVA-challenged BN rats (27.9 +/- 2.8 mg/ml) compared with SD rats (63.9 +/- 8.6 mg/ml). However, when AM from SD rats were transferred into AM-depleted BN rats, airway responsiveness (64.0 +/- 11.3 mg/ml) was reduced to the level of naïve rats (54.4 +/- 3.7 mg/ml) in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, transfer of AM from BN rats into SD rats did not modulate airway responsiveness. To our knowledge, this is the first direct evidence showing that AM may protect against the development of airway hyperresponsiveness.
Notes
Comment In: Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol. 2004 Jul;31(1):1-215208095
Comment In: Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol. 2004 Jul;31(1):3-715208096
PubMed ID
14962974 View in PubMed
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Adverse pregnancy outcomes and Coxiella burnetii antibodies in pregnant women, Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259464
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2014 Jun;20(6):925-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Stine Yde Nielsen
Kåre Mølbak
Tine Brink Henriksen
Karen Angeliki Krogfelt
Carsten Schade Larsen
Steen Villumsen
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2014 Jun;20(6):925-31
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antibodies, Bacterial - blood
Coxiella burnetii - immunology - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
DNA, Bacterial - urine
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Immunoglobulin G - blood
Immunoglobulin M - blood
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious - epidemiology - immunology - microbiology
Q Fever - complications - epidemiology - immunology - microbiology
Risk
Notes
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PubMed ID
24856281 View in PubMed
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Allergic diseases and asthma in relation to serum immunoglobulins and salivary immunoglobulin A in pre-school children: a follow-up community-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15099
Source
Clin Exp Allergy. 2005 Jan;35(1):64-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2005
Author
B R Lúethvíksson
G J Arason
O. Thorarensen
B. Ardal
H. Valdimarsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Immunology, Institute of Laboratory Medicine, Landspítali University Hospital, Reykjavík, Iceland. bjornlud@landspitali.is
Source
Clin Exp Allergy. 2005 Jan;35(1):64-9
Date
Jan-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asthma - immunology
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Dermatitis, Atopic - immunology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypersensitivity - blood
Immunoglobulin A - analysis - blood
Immunoglobulin E - blood
Immunoglobulin G - blood
Infant, Newborn
Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal - immunology
Saliva - immunology
Skin Tests
Statistics, nonparametric
Time Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: We have previously reported an association between low IgA and allergic manifestations in early childhood (0-2 years) and have now followed our cohort for an additional 2 years. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate in a longitudinal community-based cohort study the association between maturation of Ig production and allergic manifestations in the first 4 years of life. METHODS: A cohort of 161 randomly selected children was followed from birth to the age of 42-48 months and evaluated at 18-23 months (EV1; n = 179) and again at the age of 42-48 months (EV2; n = 161). Diagnoses were made with the help of a clinical questionnaire, physical examination and skin prick tests (SPTs) to 10 common allergens. Serum immunoglobulins were measured at EV1 and EV2, and salivary IgA (sal-IgA) at EV2. RESULTS: Serum IgA, IgE, IgG1, IgG2 and IgG4 increased from 2 to 4 years of age (P
PubMed ID
15649268 View in PubMed
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Allogeneic stem cell transplantation: low immunoglobulin levels associated with decreased survival.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87381
Source
Bone Marrow Transplant. 2008 Feb;41(3):267-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
Norlin A-C
Sairafi D.
Mattsson J.
Ljungman P.
Ringdén O.
Remberger M.
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Immunology, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. anna-carin.norlin@karolinska.se
Source
Bone Marrow Transplant. 2008 Feb;41(3):267-73
Date
Feb-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Agammaglobulinemia - complications - mortality
Aged
Child
Female
Graft vs Host Disease - blood - immunology - mortality
Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation - mortality
Humans
Immunoglobulin G - blood - metabolism
Male
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Survival Analysis
Survival Rate
Sweden - epidemiology
Transplantation, Homologous - immunology - mortality
Abstract
The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects and kinetics of IgG levels after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT). This study retrospectively examines 179 consecutive patients undergoing SCT between 1995 and 2002. Diagnoses included acute and chronic leukemia (n=136), solid tumors (n=11), other malignancies (n=16) and non-malignant diseases (n=16). Standard myeloablative conditioning was given to 146 patients, and 33 patients received reduced intensity conditioning. Serum samples for measurement of IgG levels were collected 3, 6 and 12 months after SCT, and then yearly. IgG levels increased after SCT throughout the study period. Factors that were associated with low IgG levels after SCT were acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), patient age
PubMed ID
17994123 View in PubMed
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455 records – page 1 of 46.