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Analysis of association and linkage for the interleukin-4 and interleukin-4 receptor b;alpha; regions in Swedish atopic dermatitis families.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188888
Source
Clin Exp Allergy. 2002 Aug;32(8):1199-202
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2002
Author
C. Söderhäll
M. Bradley
I. Kockum
H. Luthman
C-F Wahlgren
M. Nordenskjöld
Author Affiliation
Departments of Molecular Medicine, Karolinska Institute at Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. Cilla.Soderhall@cmm.ki.se
Source
Clin Exp Allergy. 2002 Aug;32(8):1199-202
Date
Aug-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chromosome Mapping
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 16
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 5
Dermatitis, Atopic - genetics - immunology
Genetic Linkage
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Immunoglobulin E - blood
Interleukin-4 - genetics
Receptors, Interleukin-4 - genetics
Severity of Illness Index
Siblings
Sweden
Abstract
Atopic dermatitis (AD) is caused by genetic and environmental factors that interact to determine disease susceptibility and severity. Several lines of evidence suggest that the IL-4 gene and the IL-4-receptor alpha (IL-4Ralpha) gene are involved in the development of atopic diseases.
The objective of this study was to evaluate the possible involvement of the chromosomal regions 5q31 and 16p12, which include the genes coding for the IL-4 and the IL-4Ralpha in AD.
We conducted linkage analysis and association studies using the microsatellite markers D16S298 and D16S403 and a single nucleotide polymorphism in the promoter region of the IL-4 gene (- 590C/T) in 406 Swedish families with at least two siblings affected with AD, in total 1514 individuals.
We report linkage (P
PubMed ID
12190659 View in PubMed
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IgE antibodies in relation to prevalence and multimorbidity of eczema, asthma, and rhinitis from birth to adolescence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277678
Source
Allergy. 2016 Mar;71(3):342-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2016
Author
N. Ballardini
A. Bergström
C-F Wahlgren
M. van Hage
E. Hallner
I. Kull
E. Melén
J M Antó
J. Bousquet
M. Wickman
Source
Allergy. 2016 Mar;71(3):342-9
Date
Mar-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Allergens
Asthma - epidemiology - immunology
Child
Child, Preschool
Comorbidity
Eczema - epidemiology - immunology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Immunoglobulin E - blood - immunology
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Population Surveillance
Prevalence
Rhinitis - epidemiology - immunology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Eczema, asthma, and rhinitis affect a large proportion of children, but their prevalence varies with age. IgE antibodies are also common in the pediatric population. However, the links between IgE, disease, and trajectories are unclear.
To better understand the links between sensitization and disease, we studied IgE sensitization ever in relation to eczema, asthma, and rhinitis, in children followed up to 16 years of age.
From the Swedish population-based birth cohort BAMSE, 2607 children were included. Parental reports from six time points between 1 and 16 years were used to identify children with eczema, asthma, and rhinitis. Blood was collected at 4, 8, and 16 years, and sensitization ever was defined as allergen-specific IgE =0.35 kUA /l to common food and/or inhalant allergens at any time point. Odds ratios for eczema, asthma, rhinitis, and multimorbidity in relation to sensitization ever were calculated using generalized estimating equations.
Fifty-one percent were sensitized at least once up to 16 years. Almost a quarter of ever-sensitized children did not have any disease. After adjustment for potential confounders, sensitization ever was significantly associated with the following: (i) eczema throughout childhood, (ii) multimorbidity of eczema, asthma, and rhinitis from 1 to 16 years (OR for multimorbidity: 5.11, 95% CI: 3.99-6.55), (iii) asthma and rhinitis from 4 to 16 years of age.
Specific IgE is strongly associated with eczema and allergic multimorbidity throughout childhood and with asthma and rhinitis from age 4 years. However, 23% of the children with IgE sensitization do not develop any disease in childhood.
PubMed ID
26505741 View in PubMed
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Susceptibility loci for atopic dermatitis on chromosomes 3, 13, 15, 17 and 18 in a Swedish population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189945
Source
Hum Mol Genet. 2002 Jun 15;11(13):1539-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-15-2002
Author
M. Bradley
C. Söderhäll
H. Luthman
C-F Wahlgren
I. Kockum
M. Nordenskjöld
Author Affiliation
Department of Molecular Medicine, Karolinska Institutet at Karolinska Hospital, SE-171 76 Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Hum Mol Genet. 2002 Jun 15;11(13):1539-48
Date
Jun-15-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chromosome Mapping
Chromosomes, Human
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 13
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 15
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 17
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 18
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 3
Computer simulation
Dermatitis, Atopic - genetics - physiopathology
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Immunoglobulin E - blood
Lod Score
Male
Microsatellite Repeats
Sweden
Abstract
Atopic dermatitis is a hereditary, pruritic, inflammatory and chronic skin disease that typically presents in early childhood and may continue or recur later. The etiology of atopic dermatitis is unknown, but several lines of evidence indicate that it is a multifactorial disorder caused by the combined influence of genetic and environmental factors, even though the relative contributions of genes and environment are not known. To identify important loci that contribute to the development of atopic dermatitis, we conducted a genome-wide linkage analysis with 367 microsatellite markers, using a non-parametric affected relative-pair method in 109 pedigrees. Three qualitative phenotypes and one semi-quantitative phenotype were studied. For the phenotype atopic dermatitis, linkage to chromosome region 3p24-22 was found. For another phenotype, atopic dermatitis combined with raised allergen-specific IgE levels, a suggestive linkage was found to chromosome region 18q21. For the semi-quantitative phenotype severity score of atopic dermatitis, suggestive linkage was found to chromosome regions 3q14, 13q14, 15q14-15 and 17q21. Identifying chromosome regions linked to susceptibility genes for atopic dermatitis provides a platform from which the search for atopic dermatitis genes can proceed.
PubMed ID
12045207 View in PubMed
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