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Antibiotic exposure and the development of coeliac disease: a nationwide case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112424
Source
BMC Gastroenterol. 2013;13:109
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Karl Mårild
Weimin Ye
Benjamin Lebwohl
Peter H R Green
Martin J Blaser
Tim Card
Jonas F Ludvigsson
Author Affiliation
Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. karlmarild@gmail.com
Source
BMC Gastroenterol. 2013;13:109
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Bacterial Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Case-Control Studies
Celiac Disease - epidemiology - etiology - immunology
Child
Child, Preschool
Enteritis - pathology
Female
GTP-Binding Proteins - immunology
Gliadin - immunology
Humans
Immunoglobulin A - blood
Immunoglobulin G - blood
Infant
Intestinal Mucosa - pathology
Intestines - microbiology - pathology
Male
Metagenome
Middle Aged
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Transglutaminases - immunology
Young Adult
Abstract
The intestinal microbiota has been proposed to play a pathogenic role in coeliac disease (CD). Although antibiotics are common environmental factors with a profound impact on intestinal microbiota, data on antibiotic use as a risk factor for subsequent CD development are scarce.
In this population-based case-control study we linked nationwide histopathology data on 2,933 individuals with CD (Marsh stage 3; villous atrophy) to the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register to examine the association between use of systemic antibiotics and subsequent CD. We also examined the association between antibiotic use in 2,118 individuals with inflammation (Marsh 1-2) and in 620 individuals with normal mucosa (Marsh 0) but positive CD serology. All individuals undergoing biopsy were matched for age and sex with 28,262 controls from the population.
Antibiotic use was associated with CD (Odds ratio [OR]?=?1.40; 95% confidence interval [CI]?=?1.27-1.53), inflammation (OR?=?1.90; 95% CI?=?1.72-2.10) and normal mucosa with positive CD serology (OR?=?1.58; 95% CI?=?1.30-1.92). ORs for prior antibiotic use in CD were similar when we excluded antibiotic use in the last year (OR?=?1.30; 95% CI?=?1.08-1.56) or restricted to individuals without comorbidity (OR?=?1.30; 95% CI?=?1.16 - 1.46).
The positive association between antibiotic use and subsequent CD but also with lesions that may represent early CD suggests that intestinal dysbiosis may play a role in the pathogenesis of CD. However, non-causal explanations for this positive association cannot be excluded.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23834758 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antibodies against cardiolipin and oxidatively modified LDL in 50-year-old men predict myocardial infarction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54451
Source
Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 1997 Nov;17(11):3159-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1997
Author
R. Wu
S. Nityanand
L. Berglund
H. Lithell
G. Holm
A K Lefvert
Author Affiliation
Immunological Research Laboratory, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 1997 Nov;17(11):3159-63
Date
Nov-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Antibodies, Anticardiolipin - blood - immunology
Autoantibodies - blood - immunology
Body mass index
Cardiolipins - immunology
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Immunoglobulin A - blood - immunology
Immunoglobulin G - blood - immunology
Immunoglobulin M - blood - immunology
Incidence
Lipids - blood
Lipoproteins, LDL - immunology
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - immunology - prevention & control
Odds Ratio
Predictive value of tests
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Survival Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Autoantibodies against oxidatively modified low-density lipoproteins (oxLDL) and cardiolipin occur in patients with vascular diseases, including atherosclerosis. The ability of such antibodies to predict myocardial infarction (MI) was investigated in a prospective nested case-control study in which healthy 50-year-old men were followed up for 20 years. Raised levels of antibodies against oxLDL and cardiolipin at 50 years of age correlated positively with the incidence of MI and mortality related to MI 10 to 20 years later. IgG and IgA antibodies against cardiolipin were associated with MI between 50 to 60 years of age and IgG and IgA antibodies against oxLDL with MI at 60 to 70 years of age. Moreover, higher antibody levels were noted in those who died from acute MI in comparison to those who survived. The predictive power of IgA and IgG antibodies was strong and largely independent of that of other strong risk factors. In conclusion, raised levels of antibodies against oxLDL and cardiolipin may predict MI and MI-related death.
PubMed ID
9409306 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antibodies against cyclic citrullinated peptide and IgA rheumatoid factor predict the development of rheumatoid arthritis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13865
Source
Arthritis Rheum. 2003 Oct;48(10):2741-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2003
Author
Solbritt Rantapää-Dahlqvist
Ben A W de Jong
Ewa Berglin
Göran Hallmans
Göran Wadell
Hans Stenlund
Ulf Sundin
Walther J van Venrooij
Author Affiliation
Umeå Universitet, Umea, Sweden. solbritt.rantapaa.dahlqvist@medicin.umu.se
Source
Arthritis Rheum. 2003 Oct;48(10):2741-9
Date
Oct-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - diagnosis - epidemiology - immunology
Autoantibodies - blood
Case-Control Studies
Citrulline - immunology
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Immunoglobulin A - blood
Immunoglobulin G - blood
Immunoglobulin M - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Predictive value of tests
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Rheumatoid Factor - metabolism
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the prevalence and predictive value of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) antibodies in individuals who subsequently developed rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and to determine the relationship to rheumatoid factor (RF) of any isotype. METHODS: A case-control study was nested within the Northern Sweden Health and Disease Study and the Maternity cohorts of Northern Sweden. Patients with RA were identified among blood donors whose samples had been taken years before the onset of symptoms. Control subjects matched for age, sex, date of sampling, and residential area were selected randomly from the same cohorts. Anti-CCP antibody and RFs were determined using enzyme immunoassays. RESULTS: Eighty-three individuals with RA were identified as having donated blood before presenting with any symptoms of joint disease (median 2.5 years [interquartile range 1.1-4.7] before RA). In samples obtained before the onset of RA, the prevalence of autoantibodies was 33.7% for anti-CCP, 16.9% for IgG-RF, 19.3% for IgM-RF, and 33.7% for IgA-RF (all highly significant compared with controls). The sensitivities for detecting these autoantibodies >1.5 years and
Notes
Comment In: Arthritis Rheum. 2003 Oct;48(10):2701-514558071
PubMed ID
14558078 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antibodies against cyclic citrullinated peptides of IgG, IgA and IgM isotype and rheumatoid factor of IgM and IgA isotype are increased in unaffected members of multicase rheumatoid arthritis families from northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129227
Source
Ann Rheum Dis. 2012 Jun;71(6):825-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Lisbeth Ärlestig
Mohammed Mullazehi
Heidi Kokkonen
Joacim Rocklöv
Johan Rönnelid
Solbritt Rantapää Dahlqvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Ann Rheum Dis. 2012 Jun;71(6):825-9
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - epidemiology - genetics - immunology
Family
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - epidemiology
Humans
Immunoenzyme Techniques
Immunoglobulin A - blood
Immunoglobulin G - blood
Immunoglobulin M - blood
Isoantibodies - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Peptides, Cyclic - immunology
Predictive value of tests
Rheumatoid Factor - blood
Risk factors
Sensitivity and specificity
Smoking - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Rheumatoid factors (RFs) and antibodies against cyclic citrullinated peptides (CCPs) of IgG, IgA and IgM isotype have been shown to precede disease onset by years.
To evaluate serological risk markers in first-degree relatives from multicase families in relation to genetic and environmental risk factors.
51 multicase families consisting of 163 individuals with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) (mean±SD age, 60±14 years; disease duration 21 years; 71.8% female) and with 157 first-degree relatives unaffected by RA (54±17 years; 59.9% female) were recruited. Isotypes of antibodies against CCPs (IgG, IgA and IgM) and RFs (IgM and IgA) were determined using automated enzyme immunoassays. Cut-off levels were established using receiver operating characteristic curves based on values for 100 unrelated healthy controls.
The concentrations and frequencies of all anti-CCP and RF isotypes were significantly increased in first-degree relatives and patients with RA compared with unrelated healthy controls. The relative distribution of IgA and IgM isotypes was higher than IgG in the relatives, whereas the IgG isotype dominated in patients with RA. The patients carried human leucocyte antigen-shared epitope (HLA-SE) significantly more often than the relatives (71.4% vs 53.9%, p=0.01), while the frequency of the PTPN22 T variant was similar. HLA-SE, combined with smoking, was significantly related to all combinations of anti-CCP and RF isotypes in patients with RA. No such relationships were found for the first-degree relatives.
All anti-CCP and RF isotypes analysed occurred more commonly in unaffected first-degree relatives from multicase families than in controls, but with different isotype distribution from patients with RA.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22128080 View in PubMed
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Antibodies to early EBV, CMV, and HHV6 antigens in systemic lupus erythematosus patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262545
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 2015;44(2):143-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
N S Rasmussen
A H Draborg
C T Nielsen
S. Jacobsen
G. Houen
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 2015;44(2):143-9
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Antigens, Viral - immunology
Case-Control Studies
Cytomegalovirus - immunology
Denmark
Female
Herpesvirus 4, Human - immunology
Herpesvirus 6, Human - immunology
Humans
Immunoglobulin A - blood
Immunoglobulin G - blood
Immunoglobulin M - blood
Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic - blood - diagnosis - immunology
Male
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
We investigated the antibody levels against early antigens of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), and human herpesvirus 6 (HHV6) in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients and healthy controls, and further correlated these antibodies to haematology/biochemistry, serology, and disease activity measures.
Immunoglobulin (Ig)M, IgG, and IgA levels against the DNA polymerase processivity factors of EBV, CMV, and HHV6, termed early antigen diffuse (EA/D), pp52, and p41, respectively, were determined in plasma samples from 77 SLE patients and 29 healthy controls by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs).
IgM, IgG, and IgA levels against EBV EA/D, and IgG and IgA levels against CMV pp52, were significantly higher in SLE patients compared with healthy controls. Furthermore, EBV EA/D- and CMV pp52-directed IgG levels were inversely and positively associated, respectively, with lymphocyte counts in SLE patients. None of the findings seemed to be associated with use of immunosuppressive medication.
Our results suggest strong, but opposite, associations of lytic EBV and CMV infections with SLE. The amplified humoral responses to EBV EA/D and CMV pp52 in our SLE patient cohort probably reflect aberrant control of EBV and CMV reactivation. However, reactivation of EBV appeared to correlate with lymphopenic manifestations in SLE patients whereas CMV reactivation seemed to correlate with increments in lymphocyte levels.
PubMed ID
25562120 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antibodies to filamentous hemagglutinin of Bordetella pertussis and protection against whooping cough in schoolchildren.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217372
Source
J Infect Dis. 1994 Sep;170(3):705-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1994
Author
Q. He
M K Viljanen
R M Olander
H. Bogaerts
D. De Grave
O. Ruuskanen
J. Mertsola
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Turku, Finland.
Source
J Infect Dis. 1994 Sep;170(3):705-8
Date
Sep-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adhesins, Bacterial
Antibodies, Bacterial - blood
Base Sequence
Bordetella pertussis - immunology - isolation & purification
Child
DNA Primers
DNA, Bacterial - analysis - genetics
Disease Outbreaks
Finland - epidemiology
Hemagglutinins - immunology
Humans
Immunoglobulin A - blood
Immunoglobulin G - blood
Immunoglobulin M - blood
Molecular Sequence Data
Pertussis Vaccine - administration & dosage
Polymerase Chain Reaction - methods
Prospective Studies
Reference Values
Virulence Factors, Bordetella
Whooping Cough - epidemiology - immunology
Abstract
A pertussis outbreak was studied prospectively in an elementary school with 39 pupils. All had been immunized with at least three doses of Finnish diphtheria-tetanus toxoid-pertussis vaccine. Diagnosis of pertussis was based on culture, polymerase chain reaction results, and EIA serology using filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA), pertussis toxin, and 69-kDa outer membrane protein as antigens. At the first sampling, 21 children had symptoms suggestive of pertussis, and 18 were healthy. Of the latter, 8 remained healthy without any antibiotic treatment and 9 developed clinical pertussis 1-22 days later. One child developed cough later, but this symptom did not meet criteria for pertussis. The mean levels of IgG, IgM, and IgA antibodies to FHA were significantly higher in 8 healthy children than in 9 children who developed pertussis after the first sampling (P
PubMed ID
8077734 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antibodies to human herpesvirus 8 latent and lytic antigens in blood donors and potential high-risk groups in Sweden: variable frequencies found in a multicenter serological study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20138
Source
J Med Virol. 2000 Dec;62(4):498-504
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2000
Author
M. Enbom
J. Sheldon
E. Lennette
T. Schulz
D V Ablashi
F. Neipel
P. Biberfeld
H. Carlberg
P. Ljungman
A. Nilsson
T. Söderström
J. Wadström
A. Linde
Author Affiliation
Department of Virology, Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control, Microbiology and Tumor Biology Center, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. malin_enbom@hotmail.com
Source
J Med Virol. 2000 Dec;62(4):498-504
Date
Dec-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Antibodies, Viral - blood - immunology
Antigens, Viral - immunology
Blood Donors
Bone Marrow Transplantation - adverse effects - immunology
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay - methods
Female
Fluorescent Antibody Technique
Herpesvirus 8, Human - immunology
Humans
Immunoglobulin A - blood - immunology
Immunoglobulin G - blood - immunology
Immunoglobulin M - blood - immunology
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Risk-Taking
Sarcoma, Kaposi - blood - immunology
Sweden
Virion - immunology
Virus Latency
Abstract
Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) is a herpesvirus associated with Kaposi's sarcoma (KS). An immunofluorescence assay was used for detection of IgG, IgM, and IgA antibodies against lytic and latent HHV-8 antigens to analyse samples from KS patients (n = 8), healthy blood donors (n = 162), individuals with a high risk sexual behaviour (n = 114), and bone marrow transplant patients (with high risk for bloodborne infections) (n = 34) in Sweden. Of the KS patients, 88% had IgG antibodies to both lytic and latent antigens by immunofluorescence. In all other groups, antilatent antibodies were rare (0-2.6%). IgG antibodies to the lytic antigens were found, by immunofluorescence, in 20% of the blood donors, 31% of the high risk patients, and in 24 and 29% of the bone marrow transplant patients (pre- and post-transplant samples, respectively). For verification of the specificity of the anti-lytic antibodies, 170 of the samples were also tested blindly at different laboratories world-wide with five other assays shown previously to detect HHV-8 antibodies in most KS patients. By using two recombinant HHV-8 proteins (ORF65/vp17 and K8.1/gp 35-37) in ELISA, a whole-virion ELISA and two immunofluorescence assays confirmation of the reactivity against lytic viral antigens was sought. The comparison of the different methods suggested the K8.1 ELISA to be highly specific and also showed a good agreement between two of the immunofluorescence assays. However, generally there was a poor correlation for positive results, indicating the need of further methodological development.
PubMed ID
11074479 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antibodies to periodontal pathogens and stroke risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179360
Source
Stroke. 2004 Sep;35(9):2020-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
Pirkko J Pussinen
Georg Alfthan
Harri Rissanen
Antti Reunanen
Sirkka Asikainen
Paul Knekt
Author Affiliation
Institute of Dentistry, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 63 (Haartmaninkatu 8), FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland. pirkko.pussinen@helsinki.fi
Source
Stroke. 2004 Sep;35(9):2020-3
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans - immunology
Antibodies, Bacterial - blood - immunology
Antibody Specificity
Case-Control Studies
Comorbidity
Coronary Disease - epidemiology - immunology
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology
Immunoglobulin A - blood - immunology
Immunoglobulin G - blood - immunology
Male
Middle Aged
Periodontitis - immunology - microbiology
Porphyromonas gingivalis - immunology
Risk
Stroke - epidemiology - immunology
Abstract
The association between cerebrovascular events and periodontitis has been found in few studies based on clinical periodontal examinations. However, evidence on the association between periodontal pathogens and stroke is lacking. Therefore, the aim of the study was to investigate whether elevated levels of serum antibodies to major periodontal pathogens predict stroke in a case-control study.
The study population comprised 6950 subjects (aged 45 to 64 years) who participated in the Mobile Clinic Health Survey in 1973 to 1976 in Finland. During a follow-up of 13 years, a total of 173 subjects had a stroke. From these, 64 subjects had already experienced a stroke or had signs of coronary heart disease (CHD) at baseline, whereas 109 subjects were apparently healthy. Two controls per case were matched for age, gender, municipality, and disease status. Serum IgG and IgA class antibody levels to the periodontal pathogens, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and Porphyromonas gingivalis, were determined by multiserotype enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.
The cases identified during the follow-up that were free of stroke or CHD at baseline were more often IgA-seropositive for A. actinomycetemcomitans than were their controls, 41.3% versus 29.3%. Compared with the seronegative, the seropositive subjects had a multivariate odds ratio of 1.6 (95% CI, 1.0 to 2.6) for stroke. The patients with a history of stroke or CHD at baseline were more often IgA-seropositive for P. gingivalis than were their controls, 79.7% versus 70.2%. When compared with the seronegative, the seropositive subjects had an odds ratio of 2.6 (1.0 to 7.0) for secondary stroke.
The present prospective study provides serological evidence that an infection caused by major periodontal pathogens is associated with future stroke.
PubMed ID
15232116 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antibodies to porphyromonas gingivalis are associated with anticitrullinated protein antibodies in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and their relatives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143848
Source
J Rheumatol. 2010 Jun;37(6):1105-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
Carol A Hitchon
Fatiha Chandad
Elizabeth D Ferucci
Annemiek Willemze
Andreea Ioan-Facsinay
Diane van der Woude
Janet Markland
David Robinson
Brenda Elias
Marianna Newkirk
Rene M Toes
Tom W J Huizinga
Hani S El-Gabalawy
Author Affiliation
University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.
Source
J Rheumatol. 2010 Jun;37(6):1105-12
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antibodies, Anti-Idiotypic - blood - immunology
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - blood - immunology - microbiology
Canada - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Dental Caries - blood - immunology - microbiology
Female
Humans
Immunoglobulin A - blood - immunology
Immunoglobulin M - blood - immunology
Indians, North American
Lipopolysaccharides - immunology
Male
Middle Aged
Peptides, Cyclic - blood - immunology
Porphyromonas gingivalis - immunology - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Rheumatoid Factor - blood - immunology
Abstract
Anticitrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA) are relatively specific for rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and predate disease. The oral pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis may play a role in breaking immune tolerance to citrullinated antigens. We studied a cohort of patients with RA and their relatives looking for associations between anti-P. gingivalis antibodies and ACPA.
Patients with RA (n = 82) and their relatives (n = 205) from a North American Native (NAN) population were studied, along with 47 NAN and 60 non-NAN controls. IgM and IgA rheumatoid factor (RF) were tested by nephelometry and ELISA. Second-generation anticyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP2) isotypes and IgG anti-P. gingivalis lipopolysaccharides were tested by ELISA. HLA-DRB1 typing was performed by sequencing. Oral hygiene and smoking habits were assessed by questionnaires.
Autoantibody frequency in patients with RA and relatives: ACPA 91% vs 19%, respectively; IgM RF 82% vs 17%; IgA RF 48% vs 22%. Anti-P. gingivalis levels were higher in patients with RA compared to relatives and controls (p = 0.005) and higher in ACPA-positive patients with RA than in ACPA-negative patients with RA (p = 0.04) and relatives (p
Notes
Comment In: J Rheumatol. 2010 Jun;37(6):1083-520516033
PubMed ID
20436074 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antibodies to the Epstein-Barr virus transactivator protein (ZEBRA) as a valuable biomarker in young patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3982
Source
Int J Cancer. 2000 Apr 1;86(1):71-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1-2000
Author
R. Dardari
M. Khyatti
A. Benider
H. Jouhadi
A. Kahlain
C. Cochet
A. Mansouri
B. El Gueddari
A. Benslimane
I. Joab
Author Affiliation
Institut Pasteur du Maroc, Casablanca, Morocco.
Source
Int J Cancer. 2000 Apr 1;86(1):71-5
Date
Apr-1-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Antibodies, Neoplasm - blood - immunology
Antibodies, Viral - blood - immunology
Antibody Specificity
Antigens, Viral - immunology
Capsid - immunology
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
DNA-Binding Proteins - immunology
Female
Herpesvirus 4, Human - immunology
Humans
Immunoglobulin A - blood - immunology
Immunoglobulin G - blood - immunology
Male
Nasopharyngeal Neoplasms - blood - immunology - pathology - virology
Neoplasm Staging
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Trans-Activators - immunology
Tumor Markers, Biological - blood - immunology
Viral Proteins - immunology
Abstract
Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) generally occurs in adults, especially in high-prevalence populations such as the Chinese and Eskimos. In Maghrebian populations, young patients affected with this malignancy represent 25% of the total NPC cases. In adults with NPC, relatively high titers of IgA antibodies to the EBV viral capsid antigen (VCA) and early antigen (EA) represent important markers. However, nearly 50% of young NPC patients are negative for IgA-anti-VCA and -EA or exhibit very low titers of these antibodies. We report here that 92% of sera from young NPC patients negative for IgA-EA and 89% of those negative for IgA-VCA were positive for IgG antibodies to the EBV transactivator protein (ZEBRA) at very high titers. Our results show that in young patients with NPC these antibodies represent the most reliable marker for diagnosis and prognosis, particularly when compared with conventional NPC markers, i.e., IgA-VCA (58%) and anti-EA (25%). The titers of IgG-ZEBRA antibodies increased along with lymph node involvement only in the young patient group, suggesting a prognostic value of this marker in this patient group.
PubMed ID
10728597 View in PubMed
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