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A 1-year evaluation of Syva MicroTrak Chlamydia enzyme immunoassay with selective confirmation by direct fluorescent-antibody assay in a high-volume laboratory.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217461
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 1994 Sep;32(9):2208-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1994
Author
E L Chan
K. Brandt
G B Horsman
Author Affiliation
Laboratory and Disease Control Services, Saskatchewan Health, Regina, Canada.
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 1994 Sep;32(9):2208-11
Date
Sep-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Algorithms
Chlamydia Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology - microbiology
Chlamydia trachomatis - immunology - isolation & purification
Cost Control
Densitometry
Diagnostic Tests, Routine - economics
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Female
Fluorescent Antibody Technique - economics
Humans
Immunoenzyme Techniques - economics
Male
Predictive value of tests
Prevalence
Reagent kits, diagnostic
Saskatchewan - epidemiology
Seasons
Sensitivity and specificity
Urethritis - diagnosis - epidemiology - microbiology
Uterine Cervicitis - diagnosis - epidemiology - microbiology
Abstract
TThe Syva MicroTrak Chlamydia enzyme immunoassay (EIA; Syva Company, San Jose, Calif.) with cytospin and direct fluorescent-antibody assay (DFA) confirmation was evaluated on 43,630 urogenital specimens over a 1-year period in the Provincial Laboratory in Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada. This was a two-phase study intended to define a testing algorithm for Chlamydia trachomatis that would be both highly accurate and cost-effective in our high-volume (> 3,000 tests per month) laboratory. The prevalence of C. trachomatis infection in our population is moderate (8 to 9%). In phase 1, we tested 6,022 male and female urogenital specimens by EIA. All specimens with optical densities above the cutoff value and those within 30% below the cutoff value were retested by DFA. This was 648 specimens (10.8% of the total). A total of 100% (211 of 211) of the specimens with optical densities equal to or greater than 1.00 absorbance unit (AU) above the cutoff value, 98.2% (175 of 178) of the specimens with optical densities of between 0.500 and 0.999 AU above the cutoff value, and 83% (167 of 201) of the specimens with optical densities within 0.499 AU above the cutoff value were confirmed to be positive. A total of 12% (7 of 58) of the specimens with optical densities within 30% below the cutoff value were positive by DFA. In phase 2, we tested 37,608 specimens (32,495 from females; 5,113 from males) by EIA. Only those specimens with optical densities of between 0.499 AU above and 30% below the cutoff value required confirmation on the basis of data from phase 1 of the study. This was 4.5% of all specimens tested. This decrease in the proportion of specimens requiring confirmation provides a significant cost savings to the laboratory. The testing algorithm gives us a 1-day turnaround time to the final confirmed test results. The MicroTrak EIA performed very well in both phases of the study, with a sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of 96.1, 99.1, 90.3, and 99.7%, respectively, in phase 2. We suggest that for laboratories that use EIA for Chlamydia testing, a study such as this one will identify an appropriate optical density range for confirmatory testing for samples from that particular population.
Notes
Cites: Epidemiol Rev. 1983;5:96-1236357824
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1993 Jun;31(6):1646-78315010
Cites: Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis. 1992 Nov-Dec;15(8):663-81478048
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1990 Nov;28(11):2473-62254422
PubMed ID
7814548 View in PubMed
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72 KD and 92 KD type IV collagenase, type IV collagen, and laminin mRNAs in breast cancer: a study by in situ hybridization.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23611
Source
J Histochem Cytochem. 1994 Jul;42(7):945-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1994
Author
Y. Soini
T. Hurskainen
M. Höyhtyä
A. Oikarinen
H. Autio-Harmainen
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
J Histochem Cytochem. 1994 Jul;42(7):945-51
Date
Jul-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Breast Neoplasms - chemistry - enzymology
Collagen - analysis
Collagenases - analysis
Female
Gelatinase B
Humans
Immunoenzyme Techniques
In Situ Hybridization
Laminin - analysis
Middle Aged
RNA Probes
RNA, Messenger - analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
It is widely accepted that basement membrane (BM) components are synthesized by epithelial cells and that production of BM-degrading proteases by cancer cells is necessary for invasive growth. In this study we used nucleic acid in situ hybridization (ISH) to investigate the presence of mRNAs for 72 KD and 92 KD Type IV collagenase, alpha 1 (IV) chain of Type IV collagen, and laminin B1 chain in 20 breast carcinomas of various histological types. The mRNA signals for 72 KD Type IV collagenase, Type IV collagen, and laminin were much more abundant in stromal fibroblasts and endothelial cells than in carcinoma cells. The signal for 92 KD Type IV collagenase mRNA was strong in carcinoma cells and considerably weaker in stromal fibroblasts and endothelial cells. Labeling for 72 KD and 92 KD Type IV collagenase mRNA was also found in benign fibroadenomas and for 92 KD Type IV collagenase in non-neoplastic ducts and acini. The results indicate that stromal cells have a more important role in the synthesis and degradation of BMs in breast carcinomas than previously thought and that production of these enzymes is not restricted to malignancy.
PubMed ID
8014478 View in PubMed
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1991 Volvo Award in basic sciences. Collagen types around the cells of the intervertebral disc and cartilage end plate: an immunolocalization study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225725
Source
Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 1991 Sep;16(9):1030-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1991
Author
S. Roberts
J. Menage
V. Duance
S. Wotton
S. Ayad
Author Affiliation
Charles Salt Research Centre, Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic Hospital, Oswestry, Shropshire, England.
Source
Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 1991 Sep;16(9):1030-8
Date
Sep-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Animals
Awards and Prizes
Cartilage - chemistry - pathology
Cattle
Collagen - analysis - classification
Humans
Immunoenzyme Techniques
Intervertebral Disc - chemistry - pathology
Middle Aged
Rats
Sweden
Abstract
Several types of collagen are known to exist in the intervertebral disc in addition to the fibrillar collagens, Types I and II. Although they constitute only a small percentage of the total collagen content, these minor collagens may have important functions. This study was designed to investigate the presence of Types I, II, III, IV, VI, and IX collagens in the intervertebral disc and cartilage end plate by immunohistochemistry, thereby establishing their location within the tissues. Types III and VI collagen have a pericellular distribution in animal and human tissue. No staining for Type IX collagen was present in normal human disc, but in rat and bovine intervertebral disc, it was also located pericellularly. These results show that cells of the intervertebral disc and cartilage end plate sit in fibrous capsules, forming chondrons similar to those described in articular cartilage. In pathologic tissue the amount and distribution of the collagen types, and the organization of the pericellular capsule, differ from that seen in control material.
PubMed ID
1948394 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of rapid antigen detection test for group B streptococci in the indigenous vaginal bacterial flora.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199127
Source
Arch Gynecol Obstet. 1999 Nov;263(1-2):34-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1999
Author
G G Donders
A. Vereecken
G. Salembier
B. Spitz
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium.
Source
Arch Gynecol Obstet. 1999 Nov;263(1-2):34-6
Date
Nov-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bacteriological Techniques
Female
Humans
Immunoenzyme Techniques
Sensitivity and specificity
Streptococcal Infections - diagnosis - microbiology
Streptococcus agalactiae - isolation & purification
Vagina - microbiology
Vaginal Diseases - diagnosis - microbiology
Abstract
To test the sensitivity of the rapid group B streptococci (GBS) antigen test ICONR and compare its accuracy in women with vaginal enterococci or with non-specific disturbance of the lactobacillary flora.
The ICONR, aerobic culture and a microscopic wet mount evaluation were done on a vaginal sample in 254 unselected women presenting for routine gynecologic care in an academic hospital in Flanders, Belgium and tested by Chi2 [diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) and its 95 percent confidence limits].
Sensitivity of the test was 70%, specificity 99.5%. Prevalence of GBS was 10.6% overall, 23% in the group with abnormal vaginal flora and 7% in the normal group (p=0.002). Accuracy of the ICONR was not affected by abnormal vaginal flora, but was significantly lower in the presence of enterococci: the DOR decreased from 490 to 58, and the positive predictive value from 94 to 80%.
With a sensitivity of 70% the enzyme immunoassay ICONR does not appear to be suitable as a practical screening tool for detecting GBS carriage in normal or preterm laboring women. In the presence of enterococci the test performed less well, with a DOR falling by 8 to 9 fold. We presume this is due to lower specificity in vivo in the presence of enterococci, as non-specific disturbance of the lactobacillary flora did not interfere with test results.
PubMed ID
10728626 View in PubMed
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Acute interstitial pneumonia in mink kits: experimental reproduction of the disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4624
Source
Vet Pathol. 1986 Sep;23(5):579-88
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1986
Author
S. Alexandersen
Source
Vet Pathol. 1986 Sep;23(5):579-88
Date
Sep-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Aleutian Mink Disease - pathology
Aleutian Mink Disease Virus - isolation & purification
Animals
Female
Immunoenzyme Techniques
Lung - pathology - ultrastructure
Male
Microscopy, Electron
Microscopy, Fluorescence
Mink
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious - pathology - veterinary
Pulmonary Fibrosis - pathology - veterinary
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Organ homogenates from kits that died of interstitial pneumonia were inoculated into adult Aleutian disease virus (ADV)-negative mink and shown to contain infectious ADV. Acute interstitial pneumonia was experimentally reproduced with the organ homogenate but only by inoculation of newborn kits born from ADV-negative dams. Older kits and kits from ADV-positive dams did not develop interstitial pneumonia, but later developed the classic form of Aleutian disease. Electron microscopic examination was done on purified suspensions of defined ADV isolates and on purified organ homogenates from kits with spontaneous or experimental interstitial pneumonia. In kits from both groups a virus, morphologically resembling the defined ADV isolates, was demonstrated. Findings of intranuclear inclusion bodies and intranuclear ADV antigen in alveolar type-II cells in affected lungs and the lack of immunologically mediated lesions suggest that lung lesions result from primary viral injury to alveolar type-II cells. Experiments also showed that infection of dams with ADV before pregnancy decreased the number of kits per mated dam and infection with ADV in mid-pregnancy caused fetal death, fetal resorption, or abortion.
PubMed ID
3022453 View in PubMed
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Adiposity, compared with masculinity, serves as a more valid cue to immunocompetence in human mate choice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118562
Source
Proc Biol Sci. 2013 Jan 22;280(1751):20122495
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-22-2013
Author
Markus J Rantala
Vinet Coetzee
Fhionna R Moore
Ilona Skrinda
Sanita Kecko
Tatjana Krama
Inese Kivleniece
Indrikis Krams
Author Affiliation
Department of Biology, Section of Ecology, University of Turku, 20014 Turku, Finland.
Source
Proc Biol Sci. 2013 Jan 22;280(1751):20122495
Date
Jan-22-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue
Adiposity - genetics
Adult
Body Weights and Measures
Choice Behavior
Cues
European Continental Ancestry Group
Face
Female
Finland
Hepatitis B Antibodies - blood
Humans
Immunocompetence - genetics
Immunoenzyme Techniques
Latvia
Male
Masculinity
Regression Analysis
Sexual Behavior - physiology
Testosterone - blood
Abstract
According to the 'good genes' hypothesis, females choose males based on traits that indicate the male's genetic quality in terms of disease resistance. The 'immunocompetence handicap hypothesis' proposed that secondary sexual traits serve as indicators of male genetic quality, because they indicate that males can contend with the immunosuppressive effects of testosterone. Masculinity is commonly assumed to serve as such a secondary sexual trait. Yet, women do not consistently prefer masculine looking men, nor is masculinity consistently related to health across studies. Here, we show that adiposity, but not masculinity, significantly mediates the relationship between a direct measure of immune response (hepatitis B antibody response) and attractiveness for both body and facial measurements. In addition, we show that circulating testosterone is more closely associated with adiposity than masculinity. These findings indicate that adiposity, compared with masculinity, serves as a more important cue to immunocompetence in female mate choice.
Notes
Cites: JAMA. 1999 Oct 27;282(16):1523-910546691
Cites: Nature. 1998 Aug 27;394(6696):884-79732869
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Cites: Proc Biol Sci. 1998 May 22;265(1399):927-339633114
Cites: Br J Psychol. 2000 Feb;91 ( Pt 1):125-4010717775
Cites: Nat Commun. 2012;3:69422353724
Cites: PLoS One. 2010;5(10):e1358521048972
Cites: Perception. 2009;38(11):1700-1120120267
Cites: Demography. 2009 Feb;46(1):27-4119348107
Cites: Evolution. 2008 Oct;62(10):2473-8618691260
Cites: Behav Res Methods. 2008 Aug;40(3):879-9118697684
Cites: Circulation. 2007 Oct 23;116(17):1942-5117965405
Cites: Horm Behav. 2007 May;51(5):633-917466990
Cites: J Nutr. 2006 May;136(5):1141-416614394
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Cites: JAMA. 2003 Jan 1;289(1):76-912503980
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2000 Sep;72(3):694-70110966886
PubMed ID
23193134 View in PubMed
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Advanced glycation end product in familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy (FAP).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198719
Source
J Intern Med. 2000 Apr;247(4):485-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2000
Author
N. Nyhlin
Y. Ando
R. Nagai
O. Suhr
M. El Sahly
H. Terazaki
T. Yamashita
M. Ando
S. Horiuchi
Author Affiliation
Gastroenterology and Hepatology Section, Department of Medicine, Umeå University Hospital, S-901 85 Umeå, Sweden.
Source
J Intern Med. 2000 Apr;247(4):485-92
Date
Apr-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Amyloid Neuropathies - genetics - pathology - surgery
Biopsy
Connective Tissue - pathology
Female
Glycosylation End Products, Advanced - analysis
Humans
Immunoenzyme Techniques
Intestinal Mucosa - pathology
Liver Transplantation
Male
Middle Aged
Muscle, Smooth, Vascular - pathology
Vitrectomy
Vitreous Body - pathology
Abstract
Advanced glycation end products (AGE) are present in amyloid deposits in beta2-microglobulin amyloidosis, and it has been postulated that glycation of beta2-microglobulin may be involved in fibril formation. The aim of this paper was to ascertain whether AGE occur in amyloid deposits in familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy (FAP).
Department of Medicine, Umeå University Hospital and First Department of Internal Medicine, Kumamoto University School of Medicine.
The presence of AGE was sought immunohistochemically and biochemically in amyloid-rich tissues from patients with FAP.
Biopsy specimens from nine patients and 10 controls were used for the immunohistochemical analysis. For amyloid preparation, vitreous samples from three FAP patients were used.
Immunohistochemical studies using a polyclonal anti-AGE antibody revealed positive immunoreactivity in intestinal materials, but the pattern of reactivity was unevenly distributed; it was often present in the border of amyloid deposits, or surrounding them. Non-amyloid associated immunoreactivity was also observed in a few regions of the specimens, although the AGE-positive structures were situated in areas containing amyloid deposits. Western blotting of purified amyloid from the vitreous body of FAP patients revealed a significant association of AGE with amyloid fibrils.
The immunoreactivity for the AGE antibody suggests that AGE may be involved in fibril formation in FAP.
PubMed ID
10792563 View in PubMed
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Age-dependent increase of Campylobacter pylori antibodies in blood donors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231679
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 1989 Jan;24(1):110-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1989
Author
T U Kosunen
J. Höök
H I Rautelin
G. Myllylä
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Bacteriology and Immunology, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 1989 Jan;24(1):110-4
Date
Jan-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Antibodies, Bacterial - analysis
Blood Donors
Campylobacter - immunology
Female
Finland
Humans
Immunoenzyme Techniques
Male
Middle Aged
Abstract
Antibodies against Campylobacter pylori were determined in 500 blood donors aged 18 to 65 years. Acid extract from a C. pylori strain was used as antigen in enzyme immunoassay. The proportion of donors with high antibody titers increased with age. For IgG antibodies it was 10% in the age group from 18 to 25 years but 60% in the group from 56 to 65 years; the increase for IgA and IgM antibodies was from 5 to 42% and from 7 to 21%, respectively. The geometric mean titers of those with high values showed no clear changes with age, which would imply chronic antigenic stimulus.
PubMed ID
2648556 View in PubMed
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Ag-specific recognition, activation, and effector function of T cells in the conjunctiva with experimental immune-mediated blepharoconjunctivitis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50675
Source
Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2003 Oct;44(10):4366-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2003
Author
Atsuki Fukushima
Akemi Ozaki
Kazuyo Fukata
Waka Ishida
Hisayuki Ueno
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, Kochi Medical School, Nankoku City, Japan. fukusima@kochi-ms.ac.jp
Source
Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2003 Oct;44(10):4366-74
Date
Oct-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Blepharitis - immunology
Blotting, Western
Chemokines - metabolism
Conjunctiva - immunology
Conjunctivitis - immunology
Cytokines - metabolism
Epitopes - immunology
Flow Cytometry
Fluoresceins
Immunoenzyme Techniques
Immunophenotyping
Lymphocyte Activation - physiology
Male
Mice
Mice, Inbred BALB C
Ovalbumin - immunology
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Receptors, Chemokine - metabolism
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Succinimides
T-Lymphocytes - physiology
Abstract
PURPOSE. To investigate antigen (Ag) specificity, activation, and effector function of the Ag-specific T cells involved in the development of experimental immune-mediated blepharoconjunctivitis (EC), an experimental conjunctivitis. METHODS. EC was induced in Brown Norway rats by injection of ovalbumin (OVA)-specific T cells followed by OVA challenge with eye drops. Eyes, including the conjunctivas, were harvested at different time points after challenge. The dependence of EC onset on the challenging Ag was assessed by challenge with an irrelevant Ag or stimulatory OVA peptides. To show the infiltration of transferred T cells into the conjunctiva, T cells were labeled with 5-(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE) before transfer. The activation of T cells in the conjunctiva was assessed by measuring phosphorylation of Lck-associated molecules by Western blot analysis. Conjunctivas were also examined by immunohistochemistry and used for reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction to determine the phenotype of the infiltrating cells and cytokine, chemokine, and chemokine receptor expression. To investigate infiltration of non Ag-specific T cells into the conjunctiva, ragweed (RW)-primed lymphocytes were transferred into OVA-specific T-cell receptor transgenic (DO11.10) mice. The mice were then challenged with RW and the conjunctivas were harvested for immunohistochemistry to detect T cells derived from DO11.10 mice. RESULTS. EC was induced only when challenged with OVA protein or stimulatory OVA peptides, and CFSE-labeled transferred cells were found in the conjunctiva. Phosphorylation of Lck and an 85-kDa Lck-associated molecule were observed in the conjunctiva 6 hours after challenge. Many cytokines and chemokines began to be expressed at 6 hours, and individual expression patterns over time correlated well with the infiltration patterns of different inflammatory cells. In DO11.10 mice that received RW-primed lymphocytes, T cells derived from the recipient mice infiltrated the conjunctiva after RW challenge. CONCLUSIONS. Ag-specific T cells initiate EC by first infiltrating the conjunctiva, where they become activated by the specific Ag in the conjunctiva.
PubMed ID
14507881 View in PubMed
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Alpha CTX as a biomarker of skeletal invasion of breast cancer: immunolocalization and the load dependency of urinary excretion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81477
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2006 Jul;15(7):1392-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2006
Author
Leeming Diana J
Delling Günter
Koizumi Mitsuru
Henriksen Kim
Karsdal Morten A
Li Bo
Qvist Per
Tankó László B
Byrjalsen Inger
Author Affiliation
Nordic Bioscience A/S, Herlev, Denmark. djl@nordicbioscience.com
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2006 Jul;15(7):1392-5
Date
Jul-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bone Neoplasms - diagnosis - secondary - urine
Breast Neoplasms - pathology - urine
Collagen Type I - urine
Female
Humans
Immunoenzyme Techniques
Neoplasm Invasiveness - diagnosis
Osteoclasts - metabolism
Peptides - urine
Tumor Markers, Biological - urine
Abstract
We recently showed that increased urinary excretion of the cross-linked, nonisomerized form of the C-telopeptide of collagen type I (alphaalphaCTX) could be a sensitive indicator of the presence of bone metastases in breast cancer patients. The present study was sought to investigate (a) the localization of alphaCTX epitopes in the proximity of a bone metastasis and (b) the relationship between number of metastases and the urinary excretion of alphaalphaCTX. Adjacent bone sections from breast cancer patients were stained for the presence of tumor cells (anti-cytokeratin antibody), osteoclasts (TRAcP activity), and alphaCTX (anti-alphaCTX antibody). The association between the extent of metastatic bone disease and urinary excretion of alphaalphaCTX measured with ELISA was assessed in 90 breast cancer patients (45 with bone metastasis and 45 without bone metastasis). Immunohistochemistry revealed accumulation of TRAcP-positive osteoclasts and intense staining for alphaCTX epitopes in the proximity of cytokeratin-positive bone metastasis. Areas of alphaCTX staining showed unstructured bone tissue under polarized light. In addition, there was a significant linear association between the number of bone metastases and the urinary levels of alphaalphaCTX in breast cancer patients with metastatic bone disease, independent of age and body mass index (r = 0.56, P
PubMed ID
16835341 View in PubMed
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360 records – page 1 of 36.