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Evidence-based strategies to improve immunization compliance of postgraduate medical trainees at large academic-medical facilities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163647
Source
Healthc Q. 2007;10(2):81-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Thirumagal Kanagasabai
Loreta Muharuma
Joy McGuire
Melanie Russell
Mary Vearncombe
Murray Urowitz
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Ontario. thirumagal.kanagasabai@utoronto.ca
Source
Healthc Q. 2007;10(2):81-6
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academic Medical Centers - legislation & jurisprudence
Blood-Borne Pathogens
Cross Infection - prevention & control
Education, Medical, Graduate
Evidence-Based Medicine
Female
Guideline Adherence
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Immunization Programs - legislation & jurisprudence - utilization
Infectious Disease Transmission, Professional-to-Patient - prevention & control
Internship and Residency
Male
Medical Staff, Hospital - legislation & jurisprudence
Ontario
Population Surveillance
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Program Evaluation
Vaccination - utilization
Abstract
The purpose of this evaluation is to assess the effectiveness of the modifications made by the University of Toronto Postgraduate Medical Education to improve medical trainee compliance with the immunization standards set forth in national guidelines, provincial regulations and protocols and university policy. Trainee compliance with immunization requirements were evaluated as of January 2003, 2004 and 2005. Statistically significant increases in compliance rates for all required immunizations--hepatitis B virus, measles, rubella and chicken pox--and tuberculosis skin tests were observed. University of Toronto postgraduate medical trainees are now highly compliant with the Hospital Management Regulation 965 of the Ontario Public Hospitals Act, Canadian Immunization Guide, Public Health Agency of Canada guidelines for prevention and control of occupational infections in healthcare and the University of Toronto Faculty of Medicine immunization policy.
PubMed ID
17491572 View in PubMed
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Good performance of vaccination by education.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208277
Source
Biologicals. 1997 Jun;25(2):237-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1997
Author
H. Peltola
Author Affiliation
Children's Hospital, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Biologicals. 1997 Jun;25(2):237-9
Date
Jun-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Ethics, Medical
Health Policy
Humans
Immunization Programs - legislation & jurisprudence
Motivation
Patient Education as Topic
Public health nursing
Scandinavia
Vaccination - legislation & jurisprudence
PubMed ID
9236059 View in PubMed
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Human papillomavirus and oropharyngeal cancer in Greenland in 1994-2010.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106188
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72:22386
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Magnus Balslev Avnstorp
Ramon Gordon Jensen
Emilie Garnæs
Marianne Hamilton Therkildsen
Bodil Norrild
Lena Specht
Christian von Buchwald
Preben Homøe
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72:22386
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - epidemiology - etiology - microbiology
Female
Greenland - epidemiology
Humans
Immunization Programs - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Incidence
Male
Mandatory Programs
Middle Aged
Oropharyngeal Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - microbiology
Papillomavirus Infections - complications - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Papillomavirus Vaccines - administration & dosage
Retrospective Studies
Sexually Transmitted Diseases, Viral - complications - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
Oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) is associated with the sexually transmitted human papillomavirus (HPV), smoking and alcohol. In Greenland, a high rate of HPV-induced cervical cancer and venereal diseases are found, which exposes the population for high risk of HPV infection. In Greenland, only girls are included in the mandatory HPV vaccination program.
To investigate the annual incidence of OPSCC and the proportion of HPV-associated OPSCC (HPV+ OPSCC) in Greenland in 1994-2010.
At Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, we identified all Greenlandic patients diagnosed and treated for OPSCC from 1994 to 2010. Sections were cut from the patient's paraffin-embedded tissue blocks and investigated for p16 expression by immunohistochemistry. HPV analyses were performed with 2 sets of general HPV primers and 1 set of HPV16-specific primer. HPV+ OPSCC was defined as both >75% p16+ cells and PCR positive for HPV.
Of 26 Greenlandic patients diagnosed with OPSCC, 17 were males and 9 were females. The proportion of HPV+ OPSCC in the total study period was 22%, without significant changes in the population in Greenland. We found an increase in the proportion of HPV+ OPSCC from 14% in 1994-2001 to 25% in 2002-2010 (p=0.51). Among males from 20 to 27% (p=0.63) and in females from 0 to 20% (p=0.71). The annual OPSCC incidence increased from 2.3/100,000 (CI=1.2-4.2) in 1994-2001 to 3.8/100,000 (CI=2.4-6.2) in 2002-2010: among males from 2.4/100,000 (CI=1.0-5.7) to 5.0/100,000 (CI=2.9-8.9).
Even though the population is at high risk of HPV infection, the proportion of 22% HPV+ OPSCC in the total study period is low compared to Europe and the United States. This might be explained by our small study size and/or by ethnic, geographical, sexual and cultural differences. Continuing observations of the OPSCC incidence and the proportion of HPV+ OPSCC in Greenland are needed.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24224159 View in PubMed
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Ill-informed consent? A content analysis of physical risk disclosure in school-based HPV vaccine programs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128281
Source
Public Health Nurs. 2012 Jan-Feb;29(1):71-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Audrey Steenbeek
Noni Macdonald
Jocelyn Downie
Mary Appleton
Françoise Baylis
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing & Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Health & Epidemiology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia. a.steenbeek@dal.ca
Source
Public Health Nurs. 2012 Jan-Feb;29(1):71-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
Humans
Immunization Programs - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration
Informed Consent - ethics - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Papillomavirus Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control
Papillomavirus Vaccines - adverse effects
Qualitative Research
Risk
Risk assessment
School Health Services - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration
Truth Disclosure - ethics
Abstract
This study examines the accuracy, completeness, and consistency of human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine related physical risks disclosed in documents available to parents, legal guardians, and girls in Canadian jurisdictions with school-based HPV vaccine programs.
We conducted an online search for program related HPV vaccine risk/benefit documents for all 13 Canadian jurisdictions between July 2008 and May 2009 including follow-up by e-mail and telephone requests for relevant documents from the respective Ministries or Departments of Health. The physical risks listed in the documents were compared across jurisdictions and against documents prepared by the vaccine manufacturer (Merck Frosst Canada), the National Advisory Committee on Immunization (NACI), the Society of Obstetricians and Gynecologists of Canada (SOGC), and a 2007 article in Maclean's Magazine.
No jurisdiction provided the same list of vaccine related physical risks as any other jurisdiction. Major discrepancies were identified.
Inaccurate, incomplete, and inconsistent information can threaten the validity of consent/authorization and potentially undermine trust in the vaccine program and the vaccine itself. Efforts are needed to improve the quality, clarity, and standardization of the content of written documents used in school-based HPV vaccine programs across Canada.
PubMed ID
22211754 View in PubMed
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Influenza vaccination for health care workers: towards a workable and effective standard.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153395
Source
Health Law J. 2009;17:297-337
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Rebecca Rodal
Nola M Ries
Kumanan Wilson
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Law, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario. rebecca.rodal@utoronto.ca
Source
Health Law J. 2009;17:297-337
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Health Personnel
Humans
Immunization Programs - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Influenza, Human - prevention & control - virology
Mandatory Programs - legislation & jurisprudence
Personal Autonomy
PubMed ID
20608322 View in PubMed
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Mandatory immunization of health care providers: the time has come.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169740
Source
Can J Public Health. 2006 Mar-Apr;97(2):86-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Ian Gemmill
Source
Can J Public Health. 2006 Mar-Apr;97(2):86-9
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Health Personnel
Humans
Immunization Programs - legislation & jurisprudence
Mandatory Programs
National Health Programs
Vaccination - legislation & jurisprudence
Notes
Comment On: Can J Public Health. 2006 Mar-Apr;97(2):139-4116620003
Comment On: Can J Public Health. 2006 Mar-Apr;97(2):136-816620002
PubMed ID
16619991 View in PubMed
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Practice survey of immunization in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217822
Source
Can J Public Health. 1994 Jul-Aug;85 Suppl 1:S31-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
T W Gyorkos
E D Franco
T N Tannenbaum
M. Abrahamowicz
L. Bédard
J. Carsley
G. Delage
M A Miller
D L Lamping
S A Grover
Author Affiliation
Division of Clinical Epidemiology, Montreal General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1994 Jul-Aug;85 Suppl 1:S31-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Data Collection
Humans
Immunization Programs - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration - standards
Infant
Program Evaluation
Abstract
A survey was undertaken in September 1991 to document current immunization practice across Canada. Information was obtained during interviews with provincial epidemiologists and key persons involved in immunization programs and recorded on standard data collection forms. Variations in practice are described in five areas: public/private health administration; legislation; monitoring system/coverage rates/surveillance; vaccine management and costs. As changes are being considered to immunization programs, a critical examination of issues such as standardization (in coding, in assessment of waste, in assessment of coverage), surveillance systems and the use of serosurveys would be beneficial.
PubMed ID
7987756 View in PubMed
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12 records – page 1 of 2.