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540 records – page 1 of 54.

Absence of transmission of the d9 measles virus--Region of the Americas, November 2002-March 2003.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186090
Source
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2003 Mar 21;52(11):228-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-21-2003
Source
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2003 Mar 21;52(11):228-9
Date
Mar-21-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Americas - epidemiology
Humans
Immunization Programs
Measles - epidemiology - prevention & control
Measles Vaccine - administration & dosage
Measles virus - genetics
Abstract
In 1994, countries of the Region of the Americas set a goal of interrupting indigenous measles transmission, and the regional plan of action for achieving this goal was begun in 1996. As of March 16, 2003, the Region of the Americas has been free for 17 weeks from known circulation of the d9 measles virus, the strain responsible for the only large outbreak of measles in the region during 2002 (Figure).
PubMed ID
12665116 View in PubMed
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Achievement of healthy people 2010 objective for adult pneumococcal vaccination in an American Indian community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97145
Source
Public Health Rep. 2010 May-Jun;125(3):448-56
Publication Type
Article
Author
Marc S Traeger
Kenneth R Say
Verna Hastings
David A Yost
Author Affiliation
Whiteriver Service Unit, Indian Health Service, Whiteriver, AZ 85941, USA. marc.traeger@ihs.gov
Source
Public Health Rep. 2010 May-Jun;125(3):448-56
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Arizona
Benchmarking
Health Plan Implementation
Healthy People Programs - organization & administration
Humans
Immunization Programs - organization & administration
Indians, North American
Middle Aged
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Pneumococcal Infections - prevention & control
Vaccination - utilization
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae) causes significant mortality throughout the United States and greater mortality among American Indian/Alaska Natives. Vaccination reduces S. pneumoniae illness. We describe the methods used to achieve the Healthy People 2010 coverage rate goals for adult pneumococcal vaccine among those at high risk for severe disease in this population. METHODS: We implemented a pneumococcal vaccination project to bolster coverage followed by an ongoing multidisciplinary program. We used community, home, inpatient, and outpatient vaccinations without financial barriers together with data improvement, staff and patient education, standing orders, and electronic and printed vaccination reminders. We reviewed local and national coverage rates and queried our electronic database to determine coverage rates. RESULTS: In 2007, pneumococcal vaccination coverage rates among people > or = 65 years of age and among high-risk people aged 18-64 years were 96.0% and 61.2%, respectively, exceeding Healthy People 2010 goals. Government Performance and Results Act analyses reports revealed a 2.7-fold increase (36.0% to 98.0%) of coverage from 2000 to 2007 among people > or = 65 years of age at Whiteriver Service Unit in Whiteriver, Arizona. CONCLUSIONS: We achieved pneumococcal vaccination rates in targeted groups of an American Indian population that reached Healthy People 2010 goals and were higher than rates in other U.S. populations. Our program may be a useful model for other communities attempting to meet Healthy People 2010 goals.
PubMed ID
20433040 View in PubMed
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Acute epiglottitis: epidemiology and Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype distribution in adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139068
Source
J Laryngol Otol. 2011 Apr;125(4):390-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
M. Isakson
S. Hugosson
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology, Örebro University Hospital, Sweden.
Source
J Laryngol Otol. 2011 Apr;125(4):390-3
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bacterial Capsules
Child
Child, Preschool
Epiglottitis - epidemiology - microbiology - prevention & control
Female
Haemophilus Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control
Haemophilus Vaccines
Haemophilus influenzae type b - isolation & purification
Humans
Immunization Programs
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Pneumococcal infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Serotyping
Streptococcus pneumoniae - classification - isolation & purification
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
We studied the incidence and bacterial epidemiology of acute epiglottitis presenting in the first 16 years following the introduction of general childhood vaccination against Haemophilus influenzae type b. Our main objectives were to analyse (1) the incidence of Streptococcus pneumoniae epiglottitis in adults and (2) the distribution of pneumococcal serotypes involved.
The medical records of patients with acute epiglottitis (International Classification of Disease code J05.1) were investigated. Streptococcus pneumoniae serotyping was performed using gel precipitation.
The overall incidence of acute epiglottitis was 0.98 cases/100,000/year, compared with 4.5 cases/100,000/year before the vaccination programme. The incidence was reduced both in children and adults, compared with pre-vaccination values. However, the incidence of Streptococcus pneumoniae epiglottitis in adults increased from 0.1 to 0.28 cases/100,000/year over the same time period. The causative agent was Streptococcus pneumoniae in 10 adults. Nine of 10 pneumococcal strains could be serotyped. All but one serotype is represented in the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23) used in adults.
In acute epiglottitis, now a disease of adults, the most important bacterial aetiology is Streptococcus pneumoniae. The serotype distribution found in this study indicates that the infection is preventable by PPV-23 vaccination with the 23-valent polysaccharide vaccine.
PubMed ID
21106138 View in PubMed
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Acute epiglottitis in children: results of a large-scale anti-Haemophilus type B immunization program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215519
Source
J Otolaryngol. 1995 Apr;24(2):92-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1995
Author
P. Wurtele
Author Affiliation
Centre hospitalier Honoré Mercier, Saint-Hyacinthe, Québec.
Source
J Otolaryngol. 1995 Apr;24(2):92-7
Date
Apr-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Epiglottitis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Haemophilus Vaccines - immunology
Haemophilus influenzae - immunology
Humans
Immunization
Immunization Programs
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Preventive Health Services
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
The incidence of acute epiglottitis in children is declining in the province of Quebec, Canada. In 1988, a PRP-D anti-Haemophilus type B vaccine was introduced into the routine vaccination schedule of 18-month-old children. A substantial reduction in the occurrence of acute epiglottitis was perceived by clinicians. Since 1992, improved new vaccines (PRP-T, HbOC, PRP-OMPC), given to 2-month-old infants, have been expected to increase the efficacy of the immunization program. The impact of the immunization program on preventing acute epiglottitis was verified using a provincial database system called Med-Echo. In the presumably vaccinated target population (0 to 6 years old), 15 children suffered acute epiglottitis in 1993, whereas 97 cases were reported on the average for each yearly period from 1984 to 1987, just before the program's inception. Thus, the incidence of acute epiglottitis in preschoolers was reduced to 15.4% of its former level. The overall efficacy of the immunization program in preventing acute epiglottitis, therefore, is estimated to be 84.6%.
PubMed ID
7602678 View in PubMed
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Addressing the emergence of pediatric vaccination concerns: recommendations from a Canadian policy analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169730
Source
Can J Public Health. 2006 Mar-Apr;97(2):139-41
Publication Type
Article
Author
Kumanan Wilson
Meredith Barakat
Edward Mills
Paul Ritvo
Heather Boon
Sunita Vohra
Alejandro R Jadad
Allison McGeer
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON. Kumanan.Wilson@uhn.on.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2006 Mar-Apr;97(2):139-41
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems
Attitude to Health
Canada
Child
Compensation and Redress
Health Policy
Humans
Immunization Programs
Liability, Legal - economics
Organizational Objectives
Pediatrics
Public Health Administration
Risk assessment
Trust
Vaccines - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Abstract
Ever since the advent of pediatric vaccination, individuals have expressed concerns about both its risks and benefits. These concerns have once again resurfaced among some segments of the population and could potentially undermine national vaccination programs. The views of the public, however, must be considered and respected in the formulation of vaccination policy. We have conducted an analysis of the pediatric vaccination "debate" in the Canadian context. We believe that there is common ground between those who support pediatric vaccination and those who are concerned about these programs. Based on our findings, we believe that the goal of public health authorities should be to maintain trust in vaccines by continuing to meet certain reciprocal responsibilities. To do so, we recommend the following: 1) increased investment in adverse event reporting systems; 2) request for proposals for consideration of a no-fault compensation program; 3) developing pre-emptive strategies to deal with potential vaccine risks; 4) further examination of mechanisms to improve communication between physicians and parents concerned about vaccination. All of these approaches would require additional investment in pediatric vaccination. However, such an investment is easy to justify given the benefits offered by pediatric vaccination and the ramifications of failing to maintain confidence in vaccination programs or missing a vaccine-related adverse event.
Notes
Comment In: Can J Public Health. 2006 Mar-Apr;97(2):86-916619991
PubMed ID
16620003 View in PubMed
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Adult immunization services: steps have to be done.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147099
Source
Vaccine. 2010 Feb 3;28(5):1177-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-3-2010
Author
Caroline Huot
Chantal Sauvageau
Geneviève Tremblay
Eve Dubé
Manale Ouakki
Author Affiliation
Université Laval, Québec, Canada. caroline.huot.4@ulaval.ca
Source
Vaccine. 2010 Feb 3;28(5):1177-80
Date
Feb-3-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Costs and Cost Analysis
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Immunization - economics - standards - trends
Immunization Programs - economics - organization & administration - standards - trends
Male
Quebec
Abstract
The objective of this study was to describe the offer and accessibility of vaccination services for adolescents and adults so they can be adapted to needs in the future.
A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out among the 81 medical clinics that offer vaccination services in a region of Québec.
The response was 70% (57/81). Over 90% of clinics planned to maintain or increase their offer of vaccination services over the next 5 years. One quarter of clinics did not have the facilities to optimize the cold chain respect. The principal barriers were the cost of purchasing vaccines and the low level of remuneration for vaccination.
This study provided better knowledge of the actual and future offer and accessibility of vaccination for adolescents and adults in Québec. It was shown that evidence-based interventions known to improve vaccine storage and accessibility were absent in many medical clinics.
PubMed ID
19945413 View in PubMed
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[Advances and challenges in immunoprophylaxis].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132687
Source
Vestn Ross Akad Med Nauk. 2011;(6):21-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
A A Baranov
V K Tatochenko
L S Namazova-Baranova
Source
Vestn Ross Akad Med Nauk. 2011;(6):21-7
Date
2011
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Bacterial Vaccines - administration & dosage
Child
Child, Preschool
Communicable Disease Control - history - methods
Communicable Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Disease Outbreaks - prevention & control
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
Immunization Programs
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Preventive Health Services - standards - trends
Russia - epidemiology
Vaccination - history - standards - trends
Vaccines, Combined - administration & dosage
Viral Vaccines - administration & dosage
Abstract
A significant progress in the management of controllable infections achieved by the early XXI century made it possible eliminate poliomyelitis across the nation, and practically eliminate measeles by vaccinating 96-99% of the children without raising the complication rate. The list of counterindications was shortened significantly, the Calendar of immunoprophylaxis was supplemented by inoculations against hepatitis B, rubella, flu, and type b Haemophilis influenzae infections. Morbidity of controllable infections in Russia decreased substantially compared with that in the 1990s. Nevertheless, the public health services are faced with the necessity of speedy application of new vaccines (including combined ones) allowing the inoculation impact on the child to be reduced. A rationale for the use of vaccines against pneumococcal and meningococcal infections, hepatitis A, varicella and for scaling up anti-pertussis vaccination coverage is proposed. Equally important is more extensive vaccination against papillomavirus infection as a means of cervical cancer prevention and introduction of the rotavirus vaccine to control most viral diarrheas.
PubMed ID
21789797 View in PubMed
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Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2006 Oct 5;126(19):2541-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-5-2006
Author
Nøkleby Hanne
Bergsaker Marianne A Riise
Author Affiliation
Divisjon for smittevern, Nasjonalt folkehelseinstitutt, Oslo, Norway. hano@fhi.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2006 Oct 5;126(19):2541-4
Date
Oct-5-2006
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems
Bacterial Vaccines - adverse effects
Child
Humans
Immunization Programs
Norway
Registries
Risk factors
United States
Vaccination - adverse effects
Viral Vaccines - adverse effects
Abstract
When the diseases we try to prevent through vaccination are rare, we tend to focus more on the associated risks. Vaccination has led to unfortunate consequences, mainly due to production failure and inadequate control in earlier years. The requirements for vaccine control are now so rigorous that the risk for such occurrences is close to zero. Local and mild systemic reactions to vaccines are rather common, and are usually well known and described in detail when a vaccine is licensed. Some vaccine reactions are however so rare that they only will be discovered through surveillance after the vaccine has become available for routine use. Suspicion of adverse events will now normally arise through the official notification systems for adverse events. Large epidemiological studies are often necessary to decide whether there is a causal relationship or only a coincidence. Recording of adverse events following vaccination and transparency about their existence, are important issues in the work to maintain the credibility of vaccines.
PubMed ID
17028637 View in PubMed
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Adverse events following immunization in Ontario's female school-based HPV program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105230
Source
Vaccine. 2014 Feb 19;32(9):1061-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-19-2014
Author
Tara Harris
Dawn M Williams
Jill Fediurek
Tsui Scott
Shelley L Deeks
Author Affiliation
Public Health Ontario, Toronto, ON, Canada. Electronic address: tara.harris@oahpp.ca.
Source
Vaccine. 2014 Feb 19;32(9):1061-6
Date
Feb-19-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems
Child
Female
Humans
Immunization Programs
Ontario
Papillomavirus Vaccines - adverse effects
Population Surveillance
Product Surveillance, Postmarketing
Vaccination - adverse effects
Abstract
In September 2007, a school-based human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination program targeting grade 8 girls (approximately 13 years old) and delivered by public health was implemented in Ontario, Canada. We assessed reports of adverse events following immunization (AEFI) from the school-based program as part of quadrivalent HPV (HPV4) vaccine safety surveillance and to contribute to a comprehensive HPV vaccine program evaluation.
AEFIs following HPV4 vaccine (Gardasil(®)) administered between September 1, 2007 and December 31, 2011 were extracted from the province's reportable disease system. Confirmed AEFI reports among females 12-15 years old (i.e. assumed to have received vaccine through the program) were included. Events were grouped according to provincial AEFI case definitions. Rates were calculated using doses distributed as the denominator.
Between 2007 and 2011, 133 confirmed AEFIs were reported while 691,994 HPV4 vaccine doses were distributed in the school-based program. The overall reporting rate was 19.2 HPV4 AEFI per 100,000 doses distributed. Annual reporting rates decreased from 30.0 to 18.3 per 100,000 doses distributed. Frequently reported events included 'allergic reaction-dermatologic/mucosa' (25%), 'rash' (22%), and 'local/injection site reaction' (20%); 26% of reports had a non-specific event of 'other severe/unusual events' selected. Ten serious AEFIs were reported (7.5% of reports) including 2 anaphylaxis, 2 seizures, 1 thrombocytopenia and 1 death. Further review found that the reports of anaphylaxis did not meet the Brighton anaphylaxis definition and the death was attributed to a preexisting cardiac condition.
Overall these findings are consistent with the safety profile of HPV4 vaccine from pre-licensure clinical trials and post-marketing surveillance reports and importantly, no new safety signals were identified, especially no reports of VTE in this younger female population. Continued assessment of HPV4 AEFI surveillance data may be important to detect and investigate safety signals.
PubMed ID
24440208 View in PubMed
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Adverse events temporally associated with meningococcal vaccines.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212643
Source
CMAJ. 1996 Feb 15;154(4):503-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-15-1996
Author
A. Yergeau
L. Alain
R. Pless
Y. Robert
Author Affiliation
Field Epidemiology Division, Laboratory Centre for Disease Control, Ottawa, Ont.
Source
CMAJ. 1996 Feb 15;154(4):503-7
Date
Feb-15-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anaphylaxis - etiology
Bacterial Vaccines - adverse effects
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Hypersensitivity, Immediate - etiology
Immunization Programs
Infant
Male
Meningococcal Vaccines
Nervous System Diseases - etiology
Quebec
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
To determine the incidence of severe adverse events temporally associated with meningococcal vaccines administered as part of a mass vaccination program.
Retrospective descriptive study of events reported to a passive provincial surveillance system.
The province of Quebec.
The 1,198,751 individuals aged 6 months to 20 years who were vaccinated against meningococcal disease between Dec. 27, 1992, and Mar. 31, 1993.
Total numbers and rates of severe adverse events, including allergic reactions, anaphylactic reactions, neurological events (other than abnormal crying and screaming) and other serious or unusual events.
A total of 118 reports of severe adverse events were selected from the surveillance system. The most frequent were allergic reactions (9.2 per 100,000 doses). Few anaphylactic or neurologic reactions were reported (0.1 and 0.5 per 100,000 doses respectively). There were no reports of sequelae or of encephalopathy, meningitis or encephalitis.
Meningococcal vaccines seem to be associated with fewer adverse events than have previously been reported. Existing surveillance programs are useful for determining the incidence of adverse events temporally associated with vaccines.
Notes
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Cites: Scand J Infect Dis. 1976;8(3):169-74788143
Cites: J Infect Dis. 1977 Aug;136 Suppl:S43-50408432
Cites: J Pediatr. 1978 May;92(5):818-22417160
Cites: Pediatr Infect Dis J. 1989 Apr;8(4):250-12717277
Cites: Vaccine. 1985 Sep;3(3):340-23933203
Cites: J Infect Dis. 1986 Dec;154(6):1033-63097160
Cites: N Z Med J. 1989 Feb 22;102(862):65-72919016
Cites: Proc Soc Exp Biol Med. 1982 Jan;169(1):54-76801667
PubMed ID
8630839 View in PubMed
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540 records – page 1 of 54.