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Cutaneous immune responses in Antarctica. A reflection of immune status?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76749
Source
Pages 249-251 in H. Linderholm et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 87. Proceedings of the Seventh International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Umeå, Sweden, 1987. Arctic Medical Research. 1988;47 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Arctic Medical Research, Vol. 47: Suppl. 1, pp. 249-251, 1988 CUTANEOUS IMMUNE RESPONSES IN ANTARCTICA A reflection of immune status? H. K. Muller, D. J. Lugg and D. L. Williams Department of Pathology, University of Tasmania and Department of Science, Antarctic Division, Hobart, Tasmania
  1 document  
Author
Muller, H.K.
Lugg, D.J.
Williams, D.L.
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, University of Tasmania
Department of Science, Arctic Division, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia
Source
Pages 249-251 in H. Linderholm et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 87. Proceedings of the Seventh International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Umeå, Sweden, 1987. Arctic Medical Research. 1988;47 Supp 1.
Date
1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Antarctica
Cell mediated immunity (CMI)
Cutaneous immune responses
Immunosuppression
Isolation
Macquarie Island
Mawson
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Ecology and children's health conditions the far eastern region of Russia

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2859
Source
Pages 148-153 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
children. In pediatrics as in general medicine. the number of multi factorial diseases increases as the consequence of ecological de- terioration. The Far Eastern Region of Russia as a whole is characterized by complex medico-de- 148 96 Circumpolar Health Toxic metals; Immune response mographic
  1 document  
Author
Kozlov, V.K.
Evseeva, G.P.
Suprun, S.V.
Chepel, T.V.
Pankova, T.D.
Moschinetsky, A.Yu.
Author Affiliation
Maternal and Child Care Institute, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Russia
Source
Pages 148-153 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Date
1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
Russia
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Child health status
Environmental monitoring
Health risks
Immune response
Russian Far East
Toxic metals
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Immunological homeostasis in a population migrated to polar regions

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature94116
Source
Pages 210-219 in R.J. Shephard and S. Itoh, eds. Proceedings of the Third International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, 1974.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1976
). Lymphocytes are involved in the regeneration process (Babaeva, 1972) and control the pathways and regen- eration rate of stem hemopoietic cells. Antibody production and the regulation of humeral and cellular immune responses are also functions of special organs and lymphoid cellsĀ· Based on the classical
  1 document  
Author
Lozovoy, VP
Author Affiliation
Siberian Branch of the Academy of Medical Sciences, Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Novosibirsk, Russia
Source
Pages 210-219 in R.J. Shephard and S. Itoh, eds. Proceedings of the Third International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, 1974.
Date
1976
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Adaptive mechanisms
Antibody production
Antigenic composition of organs and tissues
Autoimmune Diseases
Cytopathic features
Hemopoietic cells
High latitudes
Humoral and cellular immune responses
Immunity
Immunological homeostasis
Immunopathological processes
Immunostructural homeostasis
Lymphocytes
Lymphoid cells
Macrophagic and stromal cell populations
Morphogenetic information
Neuroendocrine apparatus
Phytophaemoagglutinin test
Regeneration
Seasonal and diurnal variations
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Impacts of cold climate on human heat balance, performance and health in circumpolar areas

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82839
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2005 Dec;64(5):459-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
Hassi, J
Rytkönen, M
Kotaniemi, J
Rintamäki, H
Author Affiliation
Centre for Arctic Medicine, Thule Institute, University of Oulu, Finland. juhani.hassi@oulu.fi
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2005 Dec;64(5):459-67
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiovascular responses
Cold injury
Cold-related illnesses
Heat balance
Hormonal responses
Immune responses
Prevention
Symptoms
Thermal environment
Abstract
In circumpolar areas the climate remains cool or thermoneutral during the majority of the days of the year spite of global warming. Therefore, health consequences related to cold exposure represent also in the future the majority of climate-related adverse health effects. Hot summers may be an exception. At ambient temperatures below +10 - +12 degrees C, humans experience cold stress of varying degree. Man can compensate a 10 degrees C change in ambient temperature by changing metabolic heat production by 30-40 W m(-2) or by wearing an additional/taking off ca. 0.4 clo units (corresponding to one thick clothing layer). Cold ambient temperature may be a risk for human health and cause varying levels of performance limitations. The impacts of cold exposure on health and wellbeing cause a burden to many societies in terms of lowered productivity and higher costs related to health care systems as well as public health planning and management. In order to provide preventive and protective public health actions for cold-induced adverse health effects, it is important to recognize cold related injuries, illnesses and symptoms and their turn-up temperatures, and to identify the most at-risk population subgroups and factors that increase or decrease the health risks posed by cold ambient temperatures. The majority of cold-related harmful health impacts can be prevented or managed by correct preventive and protective actions. Rapid unpredictable changes are more difficult to compensate because of lack of experience (affecting attitude and skills), preparedness (vehicles, garments, supplies, logistics etc.) and/or acclimatization.
PubMed ID
16440608 View in PubMed
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