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3D simulation as a tool for improving the safety culture during remediation work at Andreeva Bay.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265458
Source
J Radiol Prot. 2014 Dec;34(4):755-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
K. Chizhov
M K Sneve
I. Szoke
I. Mazur
N K Mark
I. Kudrin
N. Shandala
A. Simakov
G M Smith
A. Krasnoschekov
A. Kosnikov
I. Kemsky
V. Kryuchkov
Source
J Radiol Prot. 2014 Dec;34(4):755-73
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Decontamination - methods
Hazardous Waste Sites
Imaging, Three-Dimensional - methods
Models, organizational
Norway
Organizational Culture
Radiation Monitoring - methods
Radiation Protection - methods
Radioactive Waste - prevention & control
Russia
Safety Management - organization & administration
Abstract
Andreeva Bay in northwest Russia hosts one of the former coastal technical bases of the Northern Fleet. Currently, this base is designated as the Andreeva Bay branch of Northwest Center for Radioactive Waste Management (SevRAO) and is a site of temporary storage (STS) for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and other radiological waste generated during the operation and decommissioning of nuclear submarines and ships. According to an integrated expert evaluation, this site is the most dangerous nuclear facility in northwest Russia. Environmental rehabilitation of the site is currently in progress and is supported by strong international collaboration. This paper describes how the optimization principle (ALARA) has been adopted during the planning of remediation work at the Andreeva Bay STS and how Russian-Norwegian collaboration greatly contributed to ensuring the development and maintenance of a high level safety culture during this process. More specifically, this paper describes how integration of a system, specifically designed for improving the radiological safety of workers during the remediation work at Andreeva Bay, was developed in Russia. It also outlines the 3D radiological simulation and virtual reality based systems developed in Norway that have greatly facilitated effective implementation of the ALARA principle, through supporting radiological characterisation, work planning and optimization, decision making, communication between teams and with the authorities and training of field operators.
PubMed ID
25254659 View in PubMed
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3D visualization as a communicative aid in pharmaceutical advice-giving over distance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132831
Source
J Med Internet Res. 2011;13(3):e50
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Ostlund M
Dahlbäck N
Petersson GI
Author Affiliation
eHealth Institute, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden. martin.ostlund@lnu.se
Source
J Med Internet Res. 2011;13(3):e50
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - drug therapy
Drug Interactions
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
Female
Health Services Research
Humans
Imaging, Three-Dimensional - methods
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Education as Topic - methods
Pharmaceutical Services - utilization
Program Evaluation
Remote Consultation - methods
Sweden
Telemedicine - methods
Young Adult
Abstract
Medication misuse results in considerable problems for both patient and society. It is a complex problem with many contributing factors, including timely access to product information.
To investigate the value of 3-dimensional (3D) visualization paired with video conferencing as a tool for pharmaceutical advice over distance in terms of accessibility and ease of use for the advice seeker.
We created a Web-based communication service called AssistancePlus that allows an advisor to demonstrate the physical handling of a complex pharmaceutical product to an advice seeker with the aid of 3D visualization and audio/video conferencing. AssistancePlus was tested in 2 separate user studies performed in a usability lab, under realistic settings and emulating a real usage situation. In the first study, 10 pharmacy students were assisted by 2 advisors from the Swedish National Co-operation of Pharmacies' call centre on the use of an asthma inhaler. The student-advisor interview sessions were filmed on video to qualitatively explore their experience of giving and receiving advice with the aid of 3D visualization. In the second study, 3 advisors from the same call centre instructed 23 participants recruited from the general public on the use of 2 products: (1) an insulin injection pen, and (2) a growth hormone injection syringe. First, participants received advice on one product in an audio-recorded telephone call and for the other product in a video-recorded AssistancePlus session (product order balanced). In conjunction with the AssistancePlus session, participants answered a questionnaire regarding accessibility, perceived expressiveness, and general usefulness of 3D visualization for advice-giving over distance compared with the telephone and were given a short interview focusing on their experience of the 3D features.
In both studies, participants found the AssistancePlus service helpful in providing clear and exact instructions. In the second study, directly comparing AssistancePlus and the telephone, AssistancePlus was judged positively for ease of communication (P = .001), personal contact (P = .001), explanatory power (P
Notes
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Cites: J Med Internet Res. 2008;10(3):e2618762473
Cites: Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 1981;20(3):193-2007286037
PubMed ID
21771714 View in PubMed
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Automatic segmentation and recognition of lungs and lesion from CT scans of thorax.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90938
Source
Comput Med Imaging Graph. 2009 Jan;33(1):72-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2009
Author
Kakar Manish
Olsen Dag Rune
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiation Biology, Institute for Cancer Research, Rikshospitalet-Radiumhospitalet Medical centre, Oslo, Norway. Manish.Kakar@rr-research.no
Source
Comput Med Imaging Graph. 2009 Jan;33(1):72-82
Date
Jan-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anatomy, Cross-Sectional - methods
Cluster analysis
Fuzzy Logic
Humans
Image Processing, Computer-Assisted - methods
Imaging, Three-Dimensional - methods
Lung - pathology - radiography
Lung Neoplasms - pathology - radiography
Models, Statistical
Neural Networks (Computer)
Norway
Pattern Recognition, Automated - methods
Radiography, Thoracic - methods
Sensitivity and specificity
Thorax - pathology
Tomography, X-Ray Computed - methods
Abstract
In this study, a fully automated texture-based segmentation and recognition system for lesion and lungs from CT of thorax is presented. For the segmentation part, we have extracted texture features by Gabor filtering the images, and, then combined these features to segment the target volume by using Fuzzy C Means (FCM) clustering. Since clustering is sensitive to initialization of cluster prototypes, optimal initialization of the cluster prototypes was done by using a Genetic Algorithm. For the recognition stage, we have used cortex like mechanism for extracting statistical features in addition to shape-based features. The segmented regions showed a high degree of imbalance between positive and negative samples, so we employed over and under sampling for balancing the data. Finally, the balanced and normalized data was subjected to Support Vector Machine (SimpleSVM) for training and testing. Results reveal an accuracy of delineation to be 94.06%, 94.32% and 89.04% for left lung, right lung and lesion, respectively. Average sensitivity of the SVM classifier was seen to be 89.48%.
PubMed ID
19059759 View in PubMed
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Biological and clinical changes in premanifest and early stage Huntington's disease in the TRACK-HD study: the 12-month longitudinal analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138869
Source
Lancet Neurol. 2011 Jan;10(1):31-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2011
Author
Sarah J Tabrizi
Rachael I Scahill
Alexandra Durr
Raymund Ac Roos
Blair R Leavitt
Rebecca Jones
G Bernhard Landwehrmeyer
Nick C Fox
Hans Johnson
Stephen L Hicks
Christopher Kennard
David Craufurd
Chris Frost
Douglas R Langbehn
Ralf Reilmann
Julie C Stout
Author Affiliation
UCL Institute of Neurology, University College London, Department of Neurodegenerative Disease, Queen Square, London, UK. sarah.tabrizi@prion.ucl.ac.uk
Source
Lancet Neurol. 2011 Jan;10(1):31-42
Date
Jan-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Atrophy - pathology
Brain - pathology - physiopathology
Brain Mapping
Canada
Case-Control Studies
Cognition Disorders - diagnosis - etiology
Disease Progression
Female
France
Humans
Huntington Disease - complications - genetics - pathology
Imaging, Three-Dimensional - methods
International Cooperation
Longitudinal Studies
Magnetic Resonance Imaging - methods
Male
Middle Aged
Movement - physiology
Nerve Tissue Proteins - genetics
Netherlands
Nuclear Proteins - genetics
Observation
Young Adult
Abstract
TRACK-HD is a prospective observational study of Huntington's disease (HD) that examines disease progression in premanifest individuals carrying the mutant HTT gene and those with early stage disease. We report 12-month longitudinal changes, building on baseline findings.
we did a 12-month follow-up of patients recruited from the four TRACK-HD study sites in Canada, France, the Netherlands, and the UK. Participants were premanifest individuals (preHD) carrying the mutant HTT gene, patients with early HD, and controls matched by age and sex with the combined preHD and early HD groups. Data were collected by use of 3T MRI and clinical, cognitive, quantitative motor, oculomotor, and neuropsychiatric measures. Statistical analysis assessed annualised change with the use of linear regression models to estimate differences between groups.
116 preHD individuals, 114 early HD patients, and 115 people in the control group completed follow-up. Four preHD individuals, nine early HD patients, and eight people in the control group did not complete the follow-up. A further nine participants, who completed follow-up assessments, were unable to undergo MRI. After adjustment for demographics, annualised rates of generalised and regional brain atrophy were higher in preHD and early HD groups than in controls. Whole-brain atrophy rates were 0·20% (95% CI 0·05-0·34; p=0·0071) per year higher in preHD participants and 0·60% (0·44-0·76; p
Notes
Comment In: Mov Disord. 2011 Mar;26(4):60521648124
PubMed ID
21130037 View in PubMed
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Comparing image processing techniques for improved 3-dimensional ultrasound imaging.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97442
Source
J Ultrasound Med. 2010 Apr;29(4):615-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Flemming Forsberg
Vincenzo Berghella
Daniel A Merton
Keith Rychlak
Joann Meiers
Barry B Goldberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiology, Division of Ultrasound, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA. flemming.forsberg@jefferson.edu
Source
J Ultrasound Med. 2010 Apr;29(4):615-9
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdomen - ultrasonography
Adult
Female
Humans
Image Enhancement - methods
Image Processing, Computer-Assisted - methods
Imaging, Three-Dimensional - methods
Male
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Software
Statistics, nonparametric
Ultrasonography, Prenatal - methods
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to compare volumetric image processing techniques for reducing noise and speckle while retaining tissue structures in 3-dimensional (3D) gray scale ultrasound imaging. METHODS: Eighty subjects underwent a clinically indicated abdominal or obstetric 3D ultrasound examination (20 hepatic, 20 renal, and 40 obstetric cases). Volume data were processed on a pixel ("2-dimensional [2D] processing") or a voxel ("3D processing") basis using commercially available image enhancement software (ContextVision AB, Linköping, Sweden). Randomized, side-by-side comparisons of the image processing techniques were performed for each subject. An independent and blinded reader scored the volumes for image quality on a 3-point scale from 1 (worst) to 3 (best) and compared the results using a nonparametric Wilcoxson signed rank test. RESULTS: The 40 subjects with abdominal 3D imaging received a mean score (+/- 1 SD) of 1.52 +/- 0.51, 2.45 +/- 0.60, and 2.75 +/- 0.44 for the original, the 2D processed, and the 3D processed volumes, respectively. The differences between the unprocessed and the processed volumes were highly statistically significant (P
PubMed ID
20375380 View in PubMed
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A comparison of ultrasound measurements to assess carotid atherosclerosis development in subjects with and without type 2 diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174306
Source
Cardiovasc Ultrasound. 2005;3:15
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Rebecca L Pollex
J David Spence
Andrew A House
Aaron Fenster
Anthony J G Hanley
Bernard Zinman
Stewart B Harris
Robert A Hegele
Author Affiliation
Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario, Canada. rpollex@robarts.ca
Source
Cardiovasc Ultrasound. 2005;3:15
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anatomy, Cross-Sectional
Canada - epidemiology
Carotid Artery Diseases - epidemiology - ultrasonography
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology - ultrasonography
Echocardiography - methods - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted - methods
Imaging, Three-Dimensional - methods
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Reproducibility of Results
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Sensitivity and specificity
Single-Blind Method
Abstract
Subjects with type 2 diabetes are at an increased risk of vascular complications. The use of carotid ultrasound remains an attractive, non-invasive method to monitor atherosclerotic disease progression and/or response to treatment in patients with type 2 diabetes, with intima-media thickness routinely used as the gold standard to detect pathology. However, alternative measurements, such as plaque area or volume, may represent a potentially more powerful approach. Thus, the objective of this study was to compare the traditional intima-media thickness measurement against the novel total plaque volume measurement in analyzing carotid atherosclerosis development in individuals with type 2 diabetes.
The case-control study included 49 Oji-Cree adults with diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance, aged 21-69, and 49 sex- and age-matched normoglycemic subjects. At baseline, metabolic variables were measured, including body mass index, waist circumference, total cholesterol: high density lipoprotein ratio, plasma triglycerides, plasma glucose, and serum insulin. Carotid ultrasound measurements, 7 years later, assessed carotid arterial intima-media thickness and total plaque volume.
At baseline, the two groups were well matched for smoking habits, hypertension, body mass index, and waist circumference. Differences were noted in baseline measurements of total cholesterol:high density lipoprotein (P = 0.0006), plasma triglycerides (P 0.70 when comparing intima-media thickness measurements for diabetics versus non-diabetics, thousands of study subjects are required. For comparing total plaque volume measurements, only hundreds of study subjects are required.
The development of atherosclerotic plaque is greater in subjects with diabetes/impaired glucose tolerance. Total plaque volume appears to capture the atherosclerotic disease burden more effectively in subjects with type 2 diabetes, and would be an appropriate outcome measure for studies aimed at changing the diabetic milieu.
Notes
Cites: Diabetologia. 2000 Feb;43(2):156-6410753036
Cites: Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2002 Feb;55(2):165-7311796183
Cites: Am J Cardiol. 2002 Feb 21;89(4A):10B-15B; discussion 15B-16B11879661
Cites: Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2003 Jun 1;23(6):1035-4112702517
Cites: Hypertens Res. 2003 Jun;26(6):465-7112862203
Cites: Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2003 Oct 1;23(10):1845-5012958039
Cites: Stroke. 2005 Sep;36(9):1904-916081857
Cites: Curr Drug Targets Cardiovasc Haematol Disord. 2004 Jun;4(2):161-7515180488
Cites: Atherosclerosis. 1994 Nov;111(1):1-117840805
Cites: Diabetes. 1995 Apr;44(4):369-747698502
Cites: Diabetes Care. 1998 Nov;21(11):1812-89802726
Cites: Atherosclerosis. 2005 Feb;178(2):319-2515694940
Cites: Stroke. 2004 Apr;35(4):864-915017019
PubMed ID
15958169 View in PubMed
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[Cone-beam computed tomography in paleoanthropology].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262352
Source
Vestn Rentgenol Radiol. 2014 Sep-Oct;(5):49-53
Publication Type
Article
Author
A Iu Vasil'ev
A P Buzhilova
E A Egorova
D V Makarova
N Ia Berezina
I S Zorina
V I Khartanovich
Source
Vestn Rentgenol Radiol. 2014 Sep-Oct;(5):49-53
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropology, Physical - methods
Anthropometry - methods
Cone-Beam Computed Tomography - methods
Fractures, Bone - history - radiography
History, 19th Century
Humans
Imaging, Three-Dimensional - methods
Radiographic Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted - methods
Russia
Abstract
To study the capabilities of cone-bean computed tomography (CBCT) in estimating the bone structure when analyzing anthropological findings.
Twenty-four bone fragments (remains) of Napoléon Bonaparte Imperial Army soldiers who had died at a Königsberg military hospital during their retreat from Russia in the War of 1812 were examined by CBCT. A total of 28 tubular bones with different injury healing signs and a skull with maxillofacial trauma marks were investigated. Furthermore, an object from D.G. Rokhlin's paleopathological collection was used to analyze a complicated humeral infectious process. CBCT was performed by individually selecting the scanning foldings, physicotechnical conditions and regimens in relation to the anatomic location and size of fragments.
Processing of the obtained images reveled fractures of different bones in 19 (65.5%) cases. The signs of ununited fractures were visualized in 20.7% of the samples. Image post-processing showed intraarticular consolidated fractures in 13.8% of the anthropological findings. The CBCT examination of bone fragments exhibited the signs of their fusion. A wound pattern was established in 31% of the samples. The specific features of a bone amputation stump could be characterized in detail in 17.2% of the anthropological findings. 51.7% of the cases were found to have signs of sustained bone inflammatory diseases of various genesis, which in 41.4% of them were presented by linear, bulbar, and assimilated periostal reactions and significantly detectable on CBCT scans. Sequestral cavities were imaged in 31% of the fragments.
The CBCT images are characterized by high informative value (from 7.5 to 10.6 pixels/mm), optimal spatial resolution, definition, and hardness. The software of CBCT involves the parameters and possible postprocessing of images (building of panoramic and mulplanar reconstructions, assessment of the density characteristics of tissues), which allow an analysis of anthropological material, by needlessly destroying them.
PubMed ID
25775895 View in PubMed
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Did survival improve after the implementation of intraoperative neuronavigation and 3D ultrasound in glioblastoma surgery? A retrospective analysis of 192 primary operations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125619
Source
J Neurol Surg A Cent Eur Neurosurg. 2012 Mar;73(2):73-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
C A Sæther
M. Torsteinsen
S H Torp
S. Sundstrøm
G. Unsgård
O. Solheim
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
Source
J Neurol Surg A Cent Eur Neurosurg. 2012 Mar;73(2):73-8
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Brain Neoplasms - mortality - surgery - ultrasonography
Echoencephalography - instrumentation - methods
Female
Glioblastoma - mortality - surgery - ultrasonography
Humans
Imaging, Three-Dimensional - methods
Male
Middle Aged
Neuronavigation - methods
Neurosurgical Procedures - methods - mortality
Retrospective Studies
Survival Rate - trends
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Numerous observational studies indicate that more aggressive resection may prolong survival in glioblastoma patients. In Trondheim, Norway, intraoperative 3D ultrasound has been in increasing use since November 1997. The aim of the present study was to examine if the introduction of 3D ultrasound and neuronavigation (i. e., the SonoWand® system) may have had an impact on overall survival.
Patient data were obtained retrospectively for the 192 glio-blastoma patients who received surgery and postoperative radiotherapy between 1990 and 2005. Overall survival, before and after 1997, was compared using the log rank test. Possible confounders were adjusted for in a multivariate Cox regression analysis.
We observed an increase in survival for patients in the last study period (9.6 vs. 11.9 months; HR = 0.7; p = 0.034). The significant improvement in the latest time period was sustained after adjusting for age, WHO performance status (=2) and type of radiotherapy (normofractioned or hypofractioned), and chemotherapy (yes/no), p = 0.034. 10 out of 14 patients who survived more than 3 years received treatment after the implementation of 3D ultrasound.
Our study demonstrates that survival has improved within the same period that intraoperative ultrasound and neuronavigation was introduced and established in our department. The demonstrated association is a necessity for causation, but given the nature of this study, one must be cautious to claim causality. The improvement was, however, significant after adjustment for known major prognostic factors.
PubMed ID
22467479 View in PubMed
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Eco-geographic adaptations in the human ribcage throughout a 3D geometric morphometric approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296900
Source
Am J Phys Anthropol. 2018 06; 166(2):323-336
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
06-2018
Author
Daniel García-Martínez
Shahed Nalla
Maria Teresa Ferreira
Ricardo A Guichón
Manuel D D'Angelo Del Campo
Markus Bastir
Author Affiliation
Paleoanthropology Group, Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales, Madrid, Spain.
Source
Am J Phys Anthropol. 2018 06; 166(2):323-336
Date
06-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adaptation, Biological - physiology
Alaska
Anthropology, Physical
Anthropometry - methods
Argentina
Chile
Cold Temperature
European Continental Ancestry Group
Greenland
Humans
Imaging, Three-Dimensional - methods
Indians, North American
Rib Cage - diagnostic imaging - physiology
Abstract
According to eco-geographic rules, humans from high latitude areas present larger and wider trunks than their low-latitude areas counterparts. This issue has been traditionally addressed on the pelvis but information on the thorax is largely lacking. We test whether ribcages are larger in individuals inhabiting high latitudes than in those from low latitudes and explored the correlation of rib size with latitude. We also test whether a common morphological pattern is exhibited in the thorax of different cold-adapted populations, contributing to their hypothetical widening of the trunk.
We used 3D geometric morphometrics to quantify rib morphology of three hypothetically cold-adapted populations, viz. Greenland (11 individuals), Alaskan Inuit (8 individuals) and people from Tierra del Fuego (8 individuals), in a comparative framework with European (Spain, Portugal and Austria; 24 individuals) and African populations (South African and sub-Saharan African; 20 individuals).
Populations inhabiting high latitudes present longer ribs than individuals inhabiting areas closer to the equator, but a correlation (p?
PubMed ID
29417988 View in PubMed
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Evaluation of endometrial receptivity during in-vitro fertilization using three-dimensional power Doppler ultrasound.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63140
Source
Ultrasound Obstet Gynecol. 2005 Dec;26(7):765-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
I Y Järvelä
P. Sladkevicius
S. Kelly
K. Ojha
S. Campbell
G. Nargund
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland. ijarvela@cc.oulu.fi
Source
Ultrasound Obstet Gynecol. 2005 Dec;26(7):765-9
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Embryo Implantation
Embryo Transfer
Endometrium - anatomy & histology - blood supply - drug effects - ultrasonography
Female
Fertilization in Vitro
Follicle Stimulating Hormone - pharmacology
Humans
Imaging, Three-Dimensional - methods
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Rate
Prognosis
Regional Blood Flow
Statistics, nonparametric
Treatment Outcome
Ultrasonography, Doppler
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To compare sonographic endometrial characteristics in in-vitro fertilization (IVF) cycles between women who conceive and those who do not. METHODS: Thirty-five women undergoing IVF treatment participated in the study. Using three-dimensional (3D) power Doppler ultrasound, we assessed endometrial patterns, volume and vascularization, after follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) stimulation but before human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) administration (referred to hereafter as 'after FSH stimulation') and again on the day of oocyte retrieval. RESULTS: The pregnancy rate was 37% (13/35). After FSH stimulation, 29 of the 35 women had a triple-line endometrial pattern, compared with five out of 35 on the day of oocyte retrieval. In those who had a triple-line pattern after FSH stimulation the pregnancy rate was 44.8% (13/29) and it was 0% (0/6) in those with a homogeneous pattern (chi-square test, P = 0.039). If a triple-line pattern was present on the day of oocyte retrieval the pregnancy rate was 80.0% (4/5), whereas if the pattern was homogeneous the pregnancy rate was 30.0% (9/30) (P = 0.032). There were no differences between those who conceived and those who did not in endometrial thickness, volume or vascularization on either day examined. Endometrial volume decreased significantly after hCG injection in women who conceived, but not in those who did not conceive. In both groups endometrial and subendometrial vascularization decreased after hCG injection, while the endometrial thickness remained unchanged. CONCLUSIONS: The existence of a homogeneous endometrial pattern after FSH stimulation seems to be a prognostic sign of an adverse outcome in IVF, while a triple-line pattern after FSH stimulation and a decrease in endometrial volume appear to be associated with conception.
PubMed ID
16270378 View in PubMed
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26 records – page 1 of 3.