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3D modeling-based surgical planning in transsphenoidal pituitary surgery--preliminary results.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90794
Source
Acta Otolaryngol. 2008 Sep;128(9):1011-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
Raappana Antti
Koivukangas John
Pirilä Tapio
Author Affiliation
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland. antti.raappana@oulu.fi
Source
Acta Otolaryngol. 2008 Sep;128(9):1011-8
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenoma - pathology - radiography - surgery
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Endoscopy - methods
Feasibility Studies
Female
Humans
Imaging, Three-Dimensional
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Neurological
Pituitary Neoplasms - pathology - radiography - surgery
Prospective Studies
Surgery, Computer-Assisted - methods
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Young Adult
Abstract
CONCLUSION: The preoperative three-dimensional (3D) modeling of the pituitary adenoma together with pituitary gland, optic nerves, carotid arteries, and the sphenoid sinuses was adopted for routine use in our institution for all pituitary surgery patients. It gave the surgeon a more profound orientation to the individual surgical field compared with the use of conventional 2D images only. OBJECTIVE: To demonstrate the feasibility of 3D surgical planning for pituitary adenoma surgery using readily available resources. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: The computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data of 40 consecutive patients with pituitary adenoma were used to construct 3D models to be used in preoperative planning and during the surgery. A freely available, open source program (3D Slicer) downloaded to a conventional personal computer (PC) was applied. RESULTS: The authors present a brief description of the 3D reconstruction-based surgical planning workflow. In addition to the preoperative planning the 3D model was used as a 'road map' during the operation. With the 3D model the surgeon was more confident when opening the sellar wall and when evacuating the tumor from areas in contact with vital structures than when using only conventional 2D images.
PubMed ID
19086197 View in PubMed
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3D simulation as a tool for improving the safety culture during remediation work at Andreeva Bay.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265458
Source
J Radiol Prot. 2014 Dec;34(4):755-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
K. Chizhov
M K Sneve
I. Szoke
I. Mazur
N K Mark
I. Kudrin
N. Shandala
A. Simakov
G M Smith
A. Krasnoschekov
A. Kosnikov
I. Kemsky
V. Kryuchkov
Source
J Radiol Prot. 2014 Dec;34(4):755-73
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Decontamination - methods
Hazardous Waste Sites
Imaging, Three-Dimensional - methods
Models, organizational
Norway
Organizational Culture
Radiation Monitoring - methods
Radiation Protection - methods
Radioactive Waste - prevention & control
Russia
Safety Management - organization & administration
Abstract
Andreeva Bay in northwest Russia hosts one of the former coastal technical bases of the Northern Fleet. Currently, this base is designated as the Andreeva Bay branch of Northwest Center for Radioactive Waste Management (SevRAO) and is a site of temporary storage (STS) for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and other radiological waste generated during the operation and decommissioning of nuclear submarines and ships. According to an integrated expert evaluation, this site is the most dangerous nuclear facility in northwest Russia. Environmental rehabilitation of the site is currently in progress and is supported by strong international collaboration. This paper describes how the optimization principle (ALARA) has been adopted during the planning of remediation work at the Andreeva Bay STS and how Russian-Norwegian collaboration greatly contributed to ensuring the development and maintenance of a high level safety culture during this process. More specifically, this paper describes how integration of a system, specifically designed for improving the radiological safety of workers during the remediation work at Andreeva Bay, was developed in Russia. It also outlines the 3D radiological simulation and virtual reality based systems developed in Norway that have greatly facilitated effective implementation of the ALARA principle, through supporting radiological characterisation, work planning and optimization, decision making, communication between teams and with the authorities and training of field operators.
PubMed ID
25254659 View in PubMed
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3D visualization as a communicative aid in pharmaceutical advice-giving over distance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132831
Source
J Med Internet Res. 2011;13(3):e50
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Ostlund M
Dahlbäck N
Petersson GI
Author Affiliation
eHealth Institute, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden. martin.ostlund@lnu.se
Source
J Med Internet Res. 2011;13(3):e50
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - drug therapy
Drug Interactions
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
Female
Health Services Research
Humans
Imaging, Three-Dimensional - methods
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Education as Topic - methods
Pharmaceutical Services - utilization
Program Evaluation
Remote Consultation - methods
Sweden
Telemedicine - methods
Young Adult
Abstract
Medication misuse results in considerable problems for both patient and society. It is a complex problem with many contributing factors, including timely access to product information.
To investigate the value of 3-dimensional (3D) visualization paired with video conferencing as a tool for pharmaceutical advice over distance in terms of accessibility and ease of use for the advice seeker.
We created a Web-based communication service called AssistancePlus that allows an advisor to demonstrate the physical handling of a complex pharmaceutical product to an advice seeker with the aid of 3D visualization and audio/video conferencing. AssistancePlus was tested in 2 separate user studies performed in a usability lab, under realistic settings and emulating a real usage situation. In the first study, 10 pharmacy students were assisted by 2 advisors from the Swedish National Co-operation of Pharmacies' call centre on the use of an asthma inhaler. The student-advisor interview sessions were filmed on video to qualitatively explore their experience of giving and receiving advice with the aid of 3D visualization. In the second study, 3 advisors from the same call centre instructed 23 participants recruited from the general public on the use of 2 products: (1) an insulin injection pen, and (2) a growth hormone injection syringe. First, participants received advice on one product in an audio-recorded telephone call and for the other product in a video-recorded AssistancePlus session (product order balanced). In conjunction with the AssistancePlus session, participants answered a questionnaire regarding accessibility, perceived expressiveness, and general usefulness of 3D visualization for advice-giving over distance compared with the telephone and were given a short interview focusing on their experience of the 3D features.
In both studies, participants found the AssistancePlus service helpful in providing clear and exact instructions. In the second study, directly comparing AssistancePlus and the telephone, AssistancePlus was judged positively for ease of communication (P = .001), personal contact (P = .001), explanatory power (P
Notes
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PubMed ID
21771714 View in PubMed
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Altered prefrontal brain activity in persons at risk for Alzheimer's disease: an fMRI study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182811
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2003 Jun;15(2):121-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2003
Author
Eva Elgh
Anne Larsson
Sture Eriksson
Lars Nyberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine, Umeå University, Sweden. eva.elgh@germed.umu.se
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2003 Jun;15(2):121-33
Date
Jun-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - diagnosis - physiopathology
Brain Mapping
Dominance, Cerebral - physiology
Female
Frontal Lobe - physiopathology
Gyrus Cinguli - physiopathology
Humans
Image Processing, Computer-Assisted
Imaging, Three-Dimensional
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Mass Screening
Memory Disorders - diagnosis - physiopathology
Mental Status Schedule - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Neuropsychological Tests - statistics & numerical data
Occipital Lobe - physiopathology
Predictive value of tests
Prefrontal Cortex - physiopathology
Psychometrics - statistics & numerical data
Risk
Sweden
Abstract
Early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is critical for adequate treatment and care. Recently it has been shown that functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can be important in preclinical detection of AD. The purpose of this study was to examine possible differences in memory-related brain activation between persons with high versus low risk for AD. This was achieved by combining a validated neurocognitive screening battery (the 7-minutes test) with memory assessment and fMRI.
One hundred two healthy community-living persons with subjective memory complaints were recruited through advertisement and tested with the 7-minutes test. Based on their test performance they were classified as having either high (n = 8) or low risk (n = 94) for AD. Six high-risk individuals and six age-, sex-, and education-matched low-risk individuals were investigated with fMRI while engaged in episodic memory tasks.
The high-risk individuals performed worse than low-risk individuals on tests of episodic memory. Patterns of brain activity during episodic encoding and retrieval showed significant group differences (p
PubMed ID
14620071 View in PubMed
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Assessment of endometrial and ovarian characteristics using three dimensional power Doppler ultrasound to predict response in frozen embryo transfer cycles.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98513
Source
Reprod Biol Endocrinol. 2009;7:151
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Tamara Zácková
Ilkka Y Järvelä
Juha S Tapanainen
Jaroslav Feyereisl
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland. tamara.zackova@centrum.cz
Source
Reprod Biol Endocrinol. 2009;7:151
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Chorionic Gonadotropin - blood
Cryopreservation
Embryo Transfer - methods
Endometrium - metabolism - physiology - ultrasonography
Estradiol - blood
Female
Fertilization in Vitro
Humans
Imaging, Three-Dimensional
Infertility - therapy
Ovary - metabolism - physiology - ultrasonography
Predictive value of tests
Pregnancy
Progesterone - blood
Sperm Injections, Intracytoplasmic
Treatment Outcome
Ultrasonography, Doppler
Vagina - ultrasonography
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether endometrial or ovarian parameters as measured using 3D power Doppler ultrasound would predict the outcome in frozen embryo transfer (FET) cycles. METHODS: Thirty women with no known gynecological pathology undergoing FET were recruited. The FET was carried out in the natural menstrual cycle 3-4 days after the first positive LH test result. Blood samples for hormonal analysis were collected, and three-dimensional (3D) ultrasonographic examination was performed on the day of the FET and repeated with analysis of the total hCG one week later. RESULTS: The demographic, clinical, and embryological characteristics were similar between the pregnant (15/30) and nonpregnant groups (15/30). There were no differences between the groups in endometrial/subendometrial thickness, volume, or vascularization index (VI). The endometrial triple-line pattern was more often present in the pregnant group on the day of the FET (93.3% vs. 40.0%, 95% CI 25.5-81.2%). No differences in the ovaries were observed on the day of the FET. At the second visit, the triple-line pattern was still more often present in those patients who had conceived (91.7% vs. 42.9%, 95% CI 18.5-79.1%), and their corpus luteum was more active as judged by the rise in 17-hydroxyprogesterone and estradiol levels. No differences were observed in the dominant ovarian vasculature. CONCLUSIONS: According to our results, measurement of power Doppler indices using 3D ultrasound on the day of the FET does not provide any additional information concerning the outcome of the cycle. The existence of the triple-line pattern on the day of the FET seems to be a prognostic sign of a prosperous outcome after FET. The dominant ovary in the pregnant group seems to be already activated one week after the FET.
PubMed ID
20035622 View in PubMed
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Automatic segmentation and recognition of lungs and lesion from CT scans of thorax.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90938
Source
Comput Med Imaging Graph. 2009 Jan;33(1):72-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2009
Author
Kakar Manish
Olsen Dag Rune
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiation Biology, Institute for Cancer Research, Rikshospitalet-Radiumhospitalet Medical centre, Oslo, Norway. Manish.Kakar@rr-research.no
Source
Comput Med Imaging Graph. 2009 Jan;33(1):72-82
Date
Jan-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anatomy, Cross-Sectional - methods
Cluster analysis
Fuzzy Logic
Humans
Image Processing, Computer-Assisted - methods
Imaging, Three-Dimensional - methods
Lung - pathology - radiography
Lung Neoplasms - pathology - radiography
Models, Statistical
Neural Networks (Computer)
Norway
Pattern Recognition, Automated - methods
Radiography, Thoracic - methods
Sensitivity and specificity
Thorax - pathology
Tomography, X-Ray Computed - methods
Abstract
In this study, a fully automated texture-based segmentation and recognition system for lesion and lungs from CT of thorax is presented. For the segmentation part, we have extracted texture features by Gabor filtering the images, and, then combined these features to segment the target volume by using Fuzzy C Means (FCM) clustering. Since clustering is sensitive to initialization of cluster prototypes, optimal initialization of the cluster prototypes was done by using a Genetic Algorithm. For the recognition stage, we have used cortex like mechanism for extracting statistical features in addition to shape-based features. The segmented regions showed a high degree of imbalance between positive and negative samples, so we employed over and under sampling for balancing the data. Finally, the balanced and normalized data was subjected to Support Vector Machine (SimpleSVM) for training and testing. Results reveal an accuracy of delineation to be 94.06%, 94.32% and 89.04% for left lung, right lung and lesion, respectively. Average sensitivity of the SVM classifier was seen to be 89.48%.
PubMed ID
19059759 View in PubMed
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Biological and clinical changes in premanifest and early stage Huntington's disease in the TRACK-HD study: the 12-month longitudinal analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138869
Source
Lancet Neurol. 2011 Jan;10(1):31-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2011
Author
Sarah J Tabrizi
Rachael I Scahill
Alexandra Durr
Raymund Ac Roos
Blair R Leavitt
Rebecca Jones
G Bernhard Landwehrmeyer
Nick C Fox
Hans Johnson
Stephen L Hicks
Christopher Kennard
David Craufurd
Chris Frost
Douglas R Langbehn
Ralf Reilmann
Julie C Stout
Author Affiliation
UCL Institute of Neurology, University College London, Department of Neurodegenerative Disease, Queen Square, London, UK. sarah.tabrizi@prion.ucl.ac.uk
Source
Lancet Neurol. 2011 Jan;10(1):31-42
Date
Jan-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Atrophy - pathology
Brain - pathology - physiopathology
Brain Mapping
Canada
Case-Control Studies
Cognition Disorders - diagnosis - etiology
Disease Progression
Female
France
Humans
Huntington Disease - complications - genetics - pathology
Imaging, Three-Dimensional - methods
International Cooperation
Longitudinal Studies
Magnetic Resonance Imaging - methods
Male
Middle Aged
Movement - physiology
Nerve Tissue Proteins - genetics
Netherlands
Nuclear Proteins - genetics
Observation
Young Adult
Abstract
TRACK-HD is a prospective observational study of Huntington's disease (HD) that examines disease progression in premanifest individuals carrying the mutant HTT gene and those with early stage disease. We report 12-month longitudinal changes, building on baseline findings.
we did a 12-month follow-up of patients recruited from the four TRACK-HD study sites in Canada, France, the Netherlands, and the UK. Participants were premanifest individuals (preHD) carrying the mutant HTT gene, patients with early HD, and controls matched by age and sex with the combined preHD and early HD groups. Data were collected by use of 3T MRI and clinical, cognitive, quantitative motor, oculomotor, and neuropsychiatric measures. Statistical analysis assessed annualised change with the use of linear regression models to estimate differences between groups.
116 preHD individuals, 114 early HD patients, and 115 people in the control group completed follow-up. Four preHD individuals, nine early HD patients, and eight people in the control group did not complete the follow-up. A further nine participants, who completed follow-up assessments, were unable to undergo MRI. After adjustment for demographics, annualised rates of generalised and regional brain atrophy were higher in preHD and early HD groups than in controls. Whole-brain atrophy rates were 0·20% (95% CI 0·05-0·34; p=0·0071) per year higher in preHD participants and 0·60% (0·44-0·76; p
Notes
Comment In: Mov Disord. 2011 Mar;26(4):60521648124
PubMed ID
21130037 View in PubMed
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Caudate volumes in public transportation workers exposed to trauma in the Stockholm train system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90257
Source
Psychiatry Res. 2009 Feb 28;171(2):138-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-28-2009
Author
Looi Jeffrey Chee Leong
Maller Jerome Joseph
Pagani Marco
Högberg Göran
Lindberg Olof
Liberg Benny
Botes Lisa
Engman Eva-Lena
Zhang Yi
Svensson Leif
Wahlund Lars-Olof
Author Affiliation
Research Centre for the Neurosciences of Ageing, Academic Unit of Psychological Medicine, Australian National University Medical School, The Canberra Hospital, Canberra, Australia. jeffrey.looi@act.gov.au
Source
Psychiatry Res. 2009 Feb 28;171(2):138-43
Date
Feb-28-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Caudate Nucleus - pathology - physiopathology
Dominance, Cerebral - physiology
Female
Humans
Image Processing, Computer-Assisted
Imaging, Three-Dimensional
Life Change Events
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - diagnosis - physiopathology - psychology
Occupational Exposure
Organ Size - physiology
Railroads
Reference Values
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - diagnosis - physiopathology - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
The caudate nucleus is a structure implicated in the neural circuitry of psychological responses to trauma. This study aimed to quantify the volume of the caudate in persons exposed to trauma. Thirty-six subjects under 65 were recruited from transport workers in Stockholm who reported having been unintentionally responsible for a person-under-the-train accident or among employees having experienced an assault in their work (1999-2001) between 3 months and 6 years before MRI scanning. In those exposed to the trauma, a DSM-IV diagnosis of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was made by an independent psychiatrist, with subjects being classified as PTSD or no PTSD. MRI data were analyzed blindly to all clinical information by an experienced rater using a standardized manual tracing protocol to quantify the volume of the caudate. Within-group comparisons of PTSD (n=19) and no PTSD (n=17) found the right caudate nucleus to be significantly (9%) larger than the left: a right hemisphere baseline asymmetry. A multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA) was conducted to assess the volume of the caudate nucleus (right and left) in relation to the diagnosis of no PTSD (n=17) or PTSD (n=19). After adjustment for the covariates (age, sex, intracranial volume, years since trauma, and number of trauma episodes), there was a significant difference in raw right caudate nucleus volume between subjects with PTSD compared with those without PTSD. Volume of the left caudate nucleus was not significantly different between the PTSD and no PTSD groups. The right caudate volume in the PTSD group was 9% greater compared with the no PTSD group. There is a larger right hemisphere volume of the caudate within those exposed to trauma with active PTSD compared with those without PTSD, superimposed upon a baseline caudate asymmetry.
PubMed ID
19176278 View in PubMed
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Source
Ultrasound Obstet Gynecol. 2002 Jun;19(6):632-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2002
Author
I Y Järvelä
P. Sladkevicius
S. Kelly
K. Ojha
S. Campbell
G. Nargund
Author Affiliation
Diana, Princess of Wales Centre for Reproductive Medicine, Academic Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, St George's Hospital Medical School, London, UK. ijarvela@sun3.oulu.fi
Source
Ultrasound Obstet Gynecol. 2002 Jun;19(6):632-3
Date
Jun-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cesarean Section
Cicatrix
Female
Fertilization in Vitro
Humans
Imaging, Three-Dimensional
Pregnancy
Ultrasonography, Prenatal
PubMed ID
12047550 View in PubMed
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Characterization of normal and polycystic ovaries using three-dimensional power Doppler ultrasonography.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18708
Source
J Assist Reprod Genet. 2002 Dec;19(12):582-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
I Y Järvelä
H D Mason
P. Sladkevicius
S. Kelly
K. Ojha
S. Campbell
G. Nargund
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland. ijarvela@cc.oulu.fi
Source
J Assist Reprod Genet. 2002 Dec;19(12):582-90
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood Flow Velocity
Comparative Study
Female
Fertilization in Vitro
Follicle Stimulating Hormone - blood
Humans
Imaging, Three-Dimensional
Luteinizing Hormone - blood
Ovary - blood supply - ultrasonography
Polycystic Ovary Syndrome - ultrasonography
Reference Values
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Ultrasonography, Doppler, Duplex - methods
Abstract
PURPOSE: To evaluate the characteristics of polycystic compared to normal ovaries using three-dimensional (3-D) power Doppler ultrasonography. METHODS: We recruited 42 volunteers, all of whom were commencing IVF treatment. Each patient was examined in the cycle preceeding the start of drug therapy during the late follicular phase. If eight or more subcapsular follicles of 2-8 mm in diameter in one two-dimensional (2-D) plane were detected in either of the ovaries, the patient was categorized as having polycystic ovaries (PCO); otherwise the ovaries were considered normal. The parameters examined were volume of the ovary, vascularization index (VI), flow index (FI), vascularization flow index (VFI), and mean greyness (MG). In addition, the ovary was arbitrarily divided into cortex and stroma, and thereafter volume, VI, FI, VFI, and MG were calculated for these two regions. RESULTS: Twenty-eight women had normal ovaries and 14 had PCO. The comparison between normal and PCO showed that as a group the PCO were larger, without any differences in VI, Fl, VFI, or MG. In patients with PCO, the right ovary was larger than the left one. In patients with normal ovaries, Fl was higher on the left side. Division into cortex and stroma revealed that there were no differences in cortical or stromal VI, FI, VFI, or MG between normal and PCO on either side. CONCLUSIONS: The ovaries defined as polycystic were larger than normal ovaries, but there was no difference in the echogenicity of the stroma between polycystic and normal ovaries. We were also unable to demonstrate that the polycystic ovarian stroma was more vascularized than the stroma in the normal ovaries.
PubMed ID
12503891 View in PubMed
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94 records – page 1 of 10.