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Abnormal optic disc and retinal vessels in children with surgically treated hydrocephalus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90653
Source
Br J Ophthalmol. 2009 Apr;93(4):526-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2009
Author
Andersson S.
Hellström A.
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, The Queen Silvia Children's Hospital, Sahlgrenska University Hospital/Ostra, 416 85 Göteborg, Sweden. susann.andersson@oft.gu.se
Source
Br J Ophthalmol. 2009 Apr;93(4):526-30
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Fundus Oculi
Gestational Age
Humans
Hydrocephalus - complications - epidemiology - pathology - surgery
Image Processing, Computer-Assisted - methods
Infant, Newborn
Male
Ophthalmoscopy
Optic Atrophy - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Prospective Studies
Retinal Vessels - pathology
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
AIMS: To investigate the morphology of the optic disc and retinal vessels in children with surgically treated hydrocephalus. METHODS: A prospective, population-based study was performed in 69 children (median age 9.6 years) with early surgically treated hydrocephalus. All children were examined by ophthalmoscopy. Additionally, optic disc and retinal vessel morphology was evaluated in 55 children by digital image analysis of ocular fundus photographs. RESULTS: Optic atrophy was found in 10 of 69 children (14%). In comparison with a reference group, the median optic-disc area was significantly smaller (p = 0.013) in the children with hydrocephalus. There was no corresponding difference in cup area, so the rim area was significantly smaller in the hydrocephalic children (p = 0.002). Children with hydrocephalus had an abnormal retinal vascular pattern, with significantly straighter retinal arteries and fewer central vessel branching points compared with controls (p
PubMed ID
19106149 View in PubMed
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Accuracy and precision in some dental radiographic methods. A methodological study with special considerations in age estimation in juveniles.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35526
Source
Swed Dent J Suppl. 1995;104:1-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
L. Kullman
Source
Swed Dent J Suppl. 1995;104:1-38
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Determination by Skeleton
Age Determination by Teeth
Alveolar Bone Loss - radiography
Child
Dental Caries - radiography
Dental Restoration, Permanent
Female
Humans
Image Processing, Computer-Assisted
Male
Molar, Third - radiography
Odontometry
Radiographic Image Enhancement - methods
Radiography, Dental
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Tooth Root - radiography
Abstract
A computer method enabling metric measuring in radiographs has been presented. The measurements are time saving and precise and accurate measurements can be made. The statistical analysis can be performed based on a ratio scale, allowing more reliable and conclusive statistics. The most useful field for the presented method is offered in epidemiology where great materials are being handled. Since small changes can be studied, the method can be useful in studying marginal bone level changes in large populations. Or marginal bone levels around implants. In age estimation the digitizer method has no direct valuable application during adolescence, when the lower third molar is used. Here the present series of studies showed the traditional age estimation method and the digitizer method to be fairly unprecise with rather large systematic error. The skeletal age estimation method according to Greulich and Pyle was found to be more accurate and useful during the ages 14 up to 18 years. In younger children, where more parameters or teeth are available, there may be advantages to use a digital dental method instead of a traditional dental one.
PubMed ID
7660316 View in PubMed
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Acute administration of a single dose of valsartan improves left ventricular functions: a pilot study to assess the role of tissue velocity echocardiography in patients with systemic arterial hypertension in the TVE-valsartan study I.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80206
Source
Clin Physiol Funct Imaging. 2006 Nov;26(6):351-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
Govind Satish C
Brodin Lars-Ake
Nowak Jacek
Ramesh S S
Saha Samir K
Author Affiliation
BMJ Heart Center, Department of Non-invasive Cardiology, Bangalore, India.
Source
Clin Physiol Funct Imaging. 2006 Nov;26(6):351-6
Date
Nov-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antihypertensive Agents - administration & dosage
Blood Flow Velocity - drug effects
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Echocardiography, Doppler, Color
Female
Heart Rate - drug effects
Humans
Hypertension - drug therapy - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Image Processing, Computer-Assisted
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Contraction - drug effects
Pilot Projects
Research Design
Stroke Volume - drug effects
Sweden
Tetrazoles - administration & dosage
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Valine - administration & dosage - analogs & derivatives
Ventricular Function, Left - drug effects
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The advent of colour-coded tissue velocity echocardiography (TVE) has now made it possible to quantify left ventricular (LV) functions in patients with systemic arterial hypertension (HTN). Hypothesis In this project, we have studied the cardiac effects of a single dose of orally administered valsartan in patients with known HTN. METHODS: Fifty-five patients with HTN with a mean age of 56 +/- 10 years were given an early morning dose of 80 mg valsartan withholding regular antihypertensive medications on the day of investigation. TVE images, acquired on VIVID systems were digitized for postprocessing of longitudinal and radial peak systolic velocities, strain rate, and systolic and diastolic time intervals before (pre) and 5 h after (post) administration of the drug. RESULTS: Blood pressure (mmHg) pre and post, respectively, were 147 +/- 15 versus 137 +/- 14 systolic and 90 +/- 7 versus 86 +/- 7 diastolic (all P
PubMed ID
17042901 View in PubMed
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Adjusting for BMI in analyses of volumetric mammographic density and breast cancer risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300458
Source
Breast Cancer Res. 2018 12 29; 20(1):156
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-29-2018
Author
Sue Hudson
Kirsti Vik Hjerkind
Sarah Vinnicombe
Steve Allen
Cassia Trewin
Giske Ursin
Isabel Dos-Santos-Silva
Bianca L De Stavola
Author Affiliation
Department of Non-Communicable Disease Epidemiology, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London, WC1E 7HT, UK. susan.hudson@lshtm.ac.uk.
Source
Breast Cancer Res. 2018 12 29; 20(1):156
Date
12-29-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adiposity
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Body mass index
Breast - diagnostic imaging - pathology
Breast Density
Breast Neoplasms - diagnostic imaging - pathology
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Feasibility Studies
Female
Humans
Image Processing, Computer-Assisted - methods
Logistic Models
Mammography - methods
Mass Screening - methods
Middle Aged
Norway
Risk assessment
Risk factors
United Kingdom
Abstract
Fully automated assessment of mammographic density (MD), a biomarker of breast cancer risk, is being increasingly performed in screening settings. However, data on body mass index (BMI), a confounder of the MD-risk association, are not routinely collected at screening. We investigated whether the amount of fat in the breast, as captured by the amount of mammographic non-dense tissue seen on the mammographic image, can be used as a proxy for BMI when data on the latter are unavailable.
Data from a UK case control study (numbers of cases/controls: 414/685) and a Norwegian cohort study (numbers of cases/non-cases: 657/61059), both with volumetric MD measurements (dense volume (DV), non-dense volume (NDV) and percent density (%MD)) from screening-age women, were analysed. BMI (self-reported) and NDV were taken as measures of adiposity. Correlations between BMI and NDV, %MD and DV were examined after log-transformation and adjustment for age, menopausal status and parity. Logistic regression models were fitted to the UK study, and Cox regression models to the Norwegian study, to assess associations between MD and breast cancer risk, expressed as odds/hazard ratios per adjusted standard deviation (OPERA). Adjustments were first made for standard risk factors except BMI (minimally adjusted models) and then also for BMI or NDV. OPERA pooled relative risks (RRs) were estimated by fixed-effect models, and between-study heterogeneity was assessed by the I2 statistics.
BMI was positively correlated with NDV (adjusted r = 0.74 in the UK study and r = 0.72 in the Norwegian study) and with DV (r = 0.33 and r = 0.25, respectively). Both %MD and DV were positively associated with breast cancer risk in minimally adjusted models (pooled OPERA RR (95% confidence interval): 1.34 (1.25, 1.43) and 1.46 (1.36, 1.56), respectively; I2 = 0%, P >0.48 for both). Further adjustment for BMI or NDV strengthened the %MD-risk association (1.51 (1.41, 1.61); I2 = 0%, P = 0.33 and 1.51 (1.41, 1.61); I2 = 0%, P = 0.32, respectively). Adjusting for BMI or NDV marginally affected the magnitude of the DV-risk association (1.44 (1.34, 1.54); I2 = 0%, P = 0.87 and 1.49 (1.40, 1.60); I2 = 0%, P = 0.36, respectively).
When volumetric MD-breast cancer risk associations are investigated, NDV can be used as a measure of adiposity when BMI data are unavailable.
PubMed ID
30594212 View in PubMed
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Age- and sex-related differences in opioid receptor densities in the songbird vocal control system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6796
Source
J Comp Neurol. 1999 Feb 22;404(4):505-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-22-1999
Author
C C Gulledge
P. Deviche
Author Affiliation
Institute of Arctic Biology, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 99775-7000, USA. cgulledg@emerald.tufts.edu
Source
J Comp Neurol. 1999 Feb 22;404(4):505-14
Date
Feb-22-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging - physiology
Analgesics, Opioid - pharmacology
Animals
Autoradiography
Enkephalin, Ala(2)-MePhe(4)-Gly(5)-
Enkephalin, D-Penicillamine (2,5)-
Enkephalins - pharmacology
Female
Image Processing, Computer-Assisted
Male
Receptors, Opioid - physiology
Receptors, Opioid, delta - agonists - physiology
Receptors, Opioid, mu - agonists - physiology
Reproduction - physiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Sex Characteristics
Songbirds - physiology
Vocalization, Animal - physiology
Abstract
Avian vocal control regions of adult male songbirds contain opioid peptides and receptors, suggesting that opioids play a role in avian vocal behavior control. In a previous study, we found no difference in opioid receptor densities in singing versus nonsinging adult male dark-eyed juncos (Junco hyemalis), leading us to hypothesize that opioids are not involved in controlling song production. To assess whether opioids may be involved in other aspects of vocal behavior, we used quantitative in vitro autoradiography to compare mu and delta opioid receptor densities in vocal control regions of singing adult males with those of adult females and adolescent (about 3 months old) males and females. We found mu and delta receptors in all vocal control regions measured. Adolescents had significantly higher opioid receptor densities than did adults in area X (delta), robust n. of the archistriatum (delta and mu), and n. intercollicularis (mu), suggesting a developmental role for opioids in the vocal control system. Based on opioid roles in other animal models, we propose that opioids may be involved in song learning, auditory processing, and/or vocal control system development.
PubMed ID
9987994 View in PubMed
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The AGES-Reykjavik study atlases: Non-linear multi-spectral template and atlases for studies of the ageing brain.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292006
Source
Med Image Anal. 2017 Jul; 39:133-144
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jul-2017
Author
Lars Forsberg
Sigurdur Sigurdsson
Jesper Fredriksson
Asdis Egilsdottir
Bryndis Oskarsdottir
Olafur Kjartansson
Mark A van Buchem
Lenore J Launer
Vilmundur Gudnason
Alex Zijdenbos
Author Affiliation
The Icelandic Heart Association, Kopavogur, Iceland; Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Electronic address: larsef@me.com.
Source
Med Image Anal. 2017 Jul; 39:133-144
Date
Jul-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Aging
Algorithms
Anatomy, Artistic
Atlases as Topic
Brain - diagnostic imaging
Female
Humans
Image Processing, Computer-Assisted - methods
Magnetic Resonance Imaging - methods
Male
Abstract
Quantitative analyses of brain structures from Magnetic Resonance (MR) image data are often performed using automatic segmentation algorithms. Many of these algorithms rely on templates and atlases in a common coordinate space. Most freely available brain atlases are generated from relatively young individuals and not always derived from well-defined cohort studies. In this paper, we introduce a publicly available multi-spectral template with corresponding tissue probability atlases and regional atlases, optimised to use in studies of ageing cohorts (mean age 75 ± 5 years). Furthermore, we provide validation data from a regional segmentation pipeline to assure the integrity of the dataset.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28501699 View in PubMed
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Agreement between image grading of conventional (45°) and ultra wide-angle (200°) digital images in the macula in the Reykjavik eye study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143099
Source
Eye (Lond). 2010 Oct;24(10):1568-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
A. Csutak
I. Lengyel
F. Jonasson
I. Leung
A. Geirsdottir
W. Xing
T. Peto
Author Affiliation
Moorfields Eye Hospital, London, England.
Source
Eye (Lond). 2010 Oct;24(10):1568-75
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Diagnostic Imaging - methods
Feasibility Studies
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Image Processing, Computer-Assisted - methods
Macula Lutea - pathology
Macular Degeneration - diagnosis
Abstract
To establish the agreement between image grading of conventional (45°) and ultra wide-angle (200°) digital images in the macula.
In 2008, the 12-year follow-up was conducted on 573 participants of the Reykjavik Eye Study. This study included the use of the Optos P200C AF ultra wide-angle laser scanning ophthalmoscope alongside Zeiss FF 450 conventional digital fundus camera on 121 eyes with or without age-related macular degeneration using the International Classification System. Of these eyes, detailed grading was carried out on five cases each with hard drusen, geographic atrophy and chorioretinal neovascularisation, and six cases of soft drusen. Exact agreement and ?-statistics were calculated.
Comparison of the conventional and ultra wide-angle images in the macula showed an overall 96.43% agreement (?=0.93) with no disagreement at end-stage disease; although in one eye chorioretinal neovascularisation was graded as drusenoid pigment epithelial detachment. Of patients with drusen only, the exact agreement was 96.1%. The detailed grading showed no clinically significant disagreement between the conventional 45° and 200° images.
On the basis of our results, there is a good agreement between grading conventional and ultra wide-angle images in the macula.
PubMed ID
20523357 View in PubMed
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Allometric scaling of brain regions to intra-cranial volume: An epidemiological MRI study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289829
Source
Hum Brain Mapp. 2017 01; 38(1):151-164
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Date
01-2017
Author
Laura W de Jong
Jean-Sébastien Vidal
Lars E Forsberg
Alex P Zijdenbos
Thaddeus Haight
Sigurdur Sigurdsson
Vilmundur Gudnason
Mark A van Buchem
Lenore J Launer
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands.
Source
Hum Brain Mapp. 2017 01; 38(1):151-164
Date
01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Algorithms
Alzheimer Disease - diagnostic imaging - epidemiology
Brain - diagnostic imaging - pathology
Brain Mapping
Community Health Planning
Coronary Artery Disease - diagnostic imaging - epidemiology - pathology
Female
Humans
Image Processing, Computer-Assisted
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Netherlands - epidemiology
Reproducibility of Results
Sex Factors
Abstract
There is growing evidence that sub-structures of the brain scale allometrically to total brain size, that is, in a non-proportional and non-linear way. Here, scaling of different volumes of interest (VOI) to intra-cranial volume (ICV) was examined. It was assessed whether scaling was allometric or isometric and whether scaling coefficients significantly differed from each other. We also tested to what extent allometric scaling of VOI was introduced by the automated segmentation technique. Furthermore, reproducibility of allometric scaling was studied different age groups and study populations. Study samples included samples of cognitively healthy adults from the community-based Age Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik Study (AGES-Reykjavik Study) (N?=?3,883), the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults Study (CARDIA) (N =709), and the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) (N?=?180). Data encompassed participants with different age, ethnicity, risk factor profile, and ICV and VOI obtained with different automated MRI segmentation techniques. Our analysis showed that (1) allometric scaling is a trait of all parts of the brain, (2) scaling of neo-cortical white matter, neo-cortical gray matter, and deep gray matter structures including the cerebellum are significantly different from each other, and (3) allometric scaling of brain structures cannot solely be explained by age-associated atrophy, sex, ethnicity, or a systematic bias from study-specific segmentation algorithm, but appears to be a true feature of brain geometry. Hum Brain Mapp 38:151-164, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27557999 View in PubMed
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Altered extent, pattern and characteristics of microvascular density are indicators of neoplastic progression in the endometrium.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17200
Source
Int J Cancer. 2005 Jul 20;115(6):975-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-20-2005
Author
Veera Näyhä
Tea Viitanen
Frej Stenbäck
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Int J Cancer. 2005 Jul 20;115(6):975-80
Date
Jul-20-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - blood supply - pathology
Adult
Aged
Comparative Study
Disease Progression
Endometrial Hyperplasia - pathology
Endometrial Neoplasms - blood supply - pathology
Endometrium - blood supply
Female
Humans
Image Processing, Computer-Assisted
Microcirculation - pathology
Middle Aged
Neovascularization, Pathologic
Precancerous Conditions - blood supply
Abstract
The occurrence, structure and extent of microvascular density were examined in normal endometria, hyperplasia of different types and adenocarcinomas of different degrees of differentiation to determine their biologic and clinical significance in tumor development and progression. Computer-assisted quantitative image analysis was carried out on 12,500 vessels in regard to vessel number, vessel volume, size, shape and extent of vessel antibody staining, with sensitivity and reproducibility exceeding 99%. The results showed the extent, pattern and characteristics of microvascular density to be intimately associated with extent of tumor development and degree of differentiation of the tumor. Vessel number increased with superficial location in normal endometrium, with increased degree of hyperplasia and atypia and with increased degree of dedifferentiation of adenocarcinoma. Increased vessel shape alterations were characteristic of atypical complex hyperplasia when compared to other types of hyperplasia. Vessel number, size and shape were similar in proliferative endometrium and simplex type hyperplasia, and microvascular density in atypical complex hyperplasia was similar to that in well-differentiated adenocarcinoma. The results indicated that vessel shape alterations occur during progression of hyperplasia and vessel size increase occurs in complex-type hyperplasia and in moderately differentiated adenocarcinomas. We conclude that microvascular density is associated with endometrial location and with specific patterns of alteration in different stages of endometrial disease. The results suggest potential clinical applications of vessel analysis for determination of clinical behavior of endometrial preneoplastic and neoplastic alterations.
PubMed ID
15723304 View in PubMed
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Altered prefrontal brain activity in persons at risk for Alzheimer's disease: an fMRI study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182811
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2003 Jun;15(2):121-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2003
Author
Eva Elgh
Anne Larsson
Sture Eriksson
Lars Nyberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine, Umeå University, Sweden. eva.elgh@germed.umu.se
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2003 Jun;15(2):121-33
Date
Jun-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - diagnosis - physiopathology
Brain Mapping
Dominance, Cerebral - physiology
Female
Frontal Lobe - physiopathology
Gyrus Cinguli - physiopathology
Humans
Image Processing, Computer-Assisted
Imaging, Three-Dimensional
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Mass Screening
Memory Disorders - diagnosis - physiopathology
Mental Status Schedule - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Neuropsychological Tests - statistics & numerical data
Occipital Lobe - physiopathology
Predictive value of tests
Prefrontal Cortex - physiopathology
Psychometrics - statistics & numerical data
Risk
Sweden
Abstract
Early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is critical for adequate treatment and care. Recently it has been shown that functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can be important in preclinical detection of AD. The purpose of this study was to examine possible differences in memory-related brain activation between persons with high versus low risk for AD. This was achieved by combining a validated neurocognitive screening battery (the 7-minutes test) with memory assessment and fMRI.
One hundred two healthy community-living persons with subjective memory complaints were recruited through advertisement and tested with the 7-minutes test. Based on their test performance they were classified as having either high (n = 8) or low risk (n = 94) for AD. Six high-risk individuals and six age-, sex-, and education-matched low-risk individuals were investigated with fMRI while engaged in episodic memory tasks.
The high-risk individuals performed worse than low-risk individuals on tests of episodic memory. Patterns of brain activity during episodic encoding and retrieval showed significant group differences (p
PubMed ID
14620071 View in PubMed
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213 records – page 1 of 22.