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61 records – page 1 of 7.

[1986 SHSTF Congress. Unequal sex distribution]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52927
Source
Vardfacket. 1986 Nov 27;10(21):20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-27-1986
Author
D. Snäckerström
M. Lindberg
Source
Vardfacket. 1986 Nov 27;10(21):20
Date
Nov-27-1986
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Gender Identity
Humans
Identification (Psychology)
Male
Prejudice
Societies
Sweden
PubMed ID
3649140 View in PubMed
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Acculturation and mental disorder in the Inuit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2301
Source
Canadian Journal of Psychiatry. 1980 Mar;25(2):173-181.
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1980
Author
Seltzer, A.
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto
Source
Canadian Journal of Psychiatry. 1980 Mar;25(2):173-181.
Date
Mar-1980
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Acculturation
Arctic Bay
Hysterical dissociation disorder
Paranoid personality disorder
Resolute Bay
Stress, mental
Adolescent
Adult
Aggression
Alcoholism - epidemiology
Anomie
Anxiety - epidemiology
Canada
Depression - epidemiology
Female
Gender Identity
Humans
Identification (Psychology)
Interpersonal Relations
Inuits - psychology
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Psychophysiologic Disorders - epidemiology
Role
Schizophrenia - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Abstract
The phenomenon of acculturation stress is described with particular reference to the subsequent development of the transitional role conflict. The adolescent and young adult male Eskimo is especially susceptible to the anxiety generated by the process of acculturation and it is the interaction of this external stress with the bio-psychosocial characteristics of the individual within his ecological group, that may lead to an increased incidence of mental disorder. The clinical picture that develops will depend on the complex interaction of this psychosocial stressor and the level of ego development and its accompanying defence and coping strategies. We see how the development of manifest psychopathology in two young Inuit males was intimately associated with the stresses of acculturation acting upon personalities characterized by a low self-esteem and negative self-image, feelings of emasculation and a state of anomie. Coping and defensive strategies exhibited both similarities (drugs, alcohol, withdrawal, actin out) and differences (psychosis versus dissociation). The value of modified supportive therapy with continuity of care aimed at increasing self-esteem through sublimation, identification, reduction of dependency and encouragement of growth and autonomy is described, as are measures aimed at primary prevention.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2319.
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Adolescent personality development: three phases, three courses and varying turmoil. Findings from the Toronto Adolescent Longitudinal Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature230392
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1989 Aug;34(6):500-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1989
Author
H. Golombek
P. Marton
B A Stein
M. Korenblum
Author Affiliation
Wellesley Hospital, Toronto, Ontario.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1989 Aug;34(6):500-4
Date
Aug-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Female
Humans
Identification (Psychology)
Individuation
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Object Attachment
Ontario
Personality Assessment
Personality Development
Personality Disorders - psychology
Psychosexual Development
Self Concept
Abstract
The Toronto Adolescent Longitudinal Study was launched in 1977 to examine personality development in a non-clinical sample of children from ages ten through 19 over an eight year period. Following a description of their conceptualized model of personality and of the nature of the study, the authors summarize their findings which suggest new perspectives in three areas of adolescent personality development: 1) the subphases of adolescence, 2) the routes of passage through which adolescents proceed, and 3) adolescent turmoil.
PubMed ID
2766202 View in PubMed
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[Advance men, but .... Interview by Ragnar Urtegaard Thue.]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52890
Source
J Sykepleien. 1990 Jun 7;78(10):9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-7-1990

Alcohol use and its control in Finnish and Soviet marriages.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229314
Source
Br J Addict. 1990 Apr;85(4):509-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1990
Author
M. Holmila
H. Mustonen
E. Rannik
Author Affiliation
Social Research Institute of Alcohol Studies, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Br J Addict. 1990 Apr;85(4):509-20
Date
Apr-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - ethnology - psychology
Alcoholic Intoxication - prevention & control
Alcoholism - prevention & control
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Estonia
Female
Finland
Gender Identity
Humans
Identification (Psychology)
Male
Marriage
Abstract
The paper reports the results of a comparative study conducted in Finland and in Estonia. A representative sample of young couples were interviewed in both countries. Husbands in both countries usually drink more often than their wives and are less dependent on their spouses' drinking company. Wives are more likely to attempt to control their spouses' drinking. Drinking and its control are associated with the emotional relationship between the spouses, and the attempts to control are logically associated with the controlled person's frequency of drinking. The wife's attempts to control the husband's drinking are more a blue collar than a white collar phenomenon. Finnish women and men drink more often than their Estonian counterparts. Maybe as a result of the greater frequency of drinking, drinking in Finland is more family-oriented than in Estonia. The Estonian culture seems more prone to informal control of the family members' drinking. These differences may be at least partly caused by differing alcohol policy climate in the two countries.
PubMed ID
2346790 View in PubMed
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Appealing to the "experience' of the patient in the care of the dying.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature230789
Source
Sociol Health Illn. 1989 Jun;11(2):117-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1989
Author
A. Peräkylä
Source
Sociol Health Illn. 1989 Jun;11(2):117-34
Date
Jun-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Death
Data Collection
Finland
Hospitalization
Humans
Identification (Psychology)
Power (Psychology)
Professional-Patient Relations
Research
Sick Role
Sociology, Medical
Terminal Care - psychology
Abstract
The care of dying patients in hospital is characterized by the copresence of four different frames: practical, medical, lay and psychological. Within the psychological frame, the staff define the patient as an experiencing subject, exposed to the staff members' knowledge and involvement. The psychological frame is used in two different circumstances. First, it is used by the staff members when the patient deviates from an expected identity within some other frame. The deviation creates a threat to the working conditions and moral order at the ward. The threat is managed through a shift into the psychological frame. Second, the psychological frame is used spontaneously in the accounts of their work given by staff members to the sociological field researcher. The image of care associated with the field researcher is characterized by a special awareness of the psychological issues. Thus the field researcher is inevitably a part of the functioning of the new kind of surveillance working through the psychological frame.
PubMed ID
10294547 View in PubMed
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[Are men taking over the SHSTF (Swedish Association for Health and Nursing Employees)?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52936
Source
Vardfacket. 1983 Jan 13;7(1):4-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-13-1983

Are special treatment facilities for female alcoholics needed? A controlled 2-year follow-up study from a specialized female unit (EWA) versus a mixed male/female treatment facility.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12305
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 1989 Aug;13(4):499-504
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1989
Author
L. Dahlgren
A. Willander
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Alcohol and Drug Research (EWA Unit), Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 1989 Aug;13(4):499-504
Date
Aug-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - psychology
Alcoholism - psychology - rehabilitation
Combined Modality Therapy
Disulfiram - therapeutic use
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gender Identity
Humans
Identification (Psychology)
Middle Aged
Outpatient Clinics, Hospital - organization & administration
Patient Care Team - organization & administration
Psychiatric Department, Hospital - organization & administration
Recurrence
Social Environment
Sweden
Abstract
Women with alcohol problems constitute an increasing number of patients in medical service. Do they need special care? How should the treatment program be designed? The specialized female Karolinska Project for Early Treatment of Women with Alcohol Addiction (EWA) unit at the Karolinska Hospital in Stockholm, Sweden, was opened in 1981. The aim of the project is to reach women in an early stage of alcohol dependence behavior and to develop treatment programs specific to the needs of females alone. In order to investigate the value of such a specialized female unit a controlled 2-year follow-up study was carried out including 200 women. The probands were treated in the female only EWA-unit, whereas the controls were placed in the care of traditional mixed-sex alcoholism treatment centers. The 2-year follow-up study showed a more successful rehabilitation regarding alcohol consumption and social adjustment for the women treated in the specialized female unit (EWA). Improvement was noted also for the controls but to a lesser extent. Probably one of the most important achievements of a specialized female unit, such as EWA, is to attract women to come for help earlier.
PubMed ID
2679204 View in PubMed
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The cognitive and identity development of twins at 16 years of age: a follow-up study of 32 twin pairs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30716
Source
Twin Res. 2003 Aug;6(4):328-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2003
Author
Britta Alin Akerman
Eve Suurvee
Author Affiliation
Department of Special Education, Stockholm Institute of Education, Stockholm, Sweden. Britta.Alin-Akerman@lhs.se
Source
Twin Res. 2003 Aug;6(4):328-33
Date
Aug-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child Development
Child, Preschool
Cognition
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Identification (Psychology)
Infant
Male
Personality Development
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Identification
Sweden
Twins - physiology - psychology
Twins, Dizygotic - physiology - psychology
Twins, Monozygotic - physiology - psychology
Abstract
This is a follow up study of twins within the Stockholm area, including 32 families and their twins attending grade nine. The twins have been followed from birth to 16 years of age. The main purpose of this study from its inception was to assess mental and cognitive development at different ages. Another aim was to see how the twins who were born prematurely are developing during the school ages. A third aim has been to gain a deeper insight into the relationship between co-twins and the development of their identities, which is the focus of this paper. Several ability tests have been used, as well as questionnaires about interests, attitudes toward school, and leisure activities. At the 16-year follow-up, a psychological method, the Wartegg drawing test, designed to examine identity, ego strength, dependency, ambition, anxiety, willpower, creativity, empathy and coping strategies has been used. The results indicate that it is difficult for twins to develop independence and a positive identity, as they have to emancipate themselves both from their parents and from their co-twins. Some differences in identity, anxiety and ambition were observed between female and male twins, MZ and DZ twins, preterm and fullterm twins. Prematurity, sex and zygosity no longer had any relation to cognitive development at 16 years of age.
PubMed ID
14511442 View in PubMed
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61 records – page 1 of 7.