Skip header and navigation

3 records – page 1 of 1.

Medical trainee perceptions of medical school education about suffering: a pilot study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148140
Source
J Palliat Med. 2009 Oct;12(10):929-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
Thomas R Egnew
Douglas C Schaad
Author Affiliation
Tacoma Family Medicine, 521 Martin Luther King Jr. Way, Tacoma, WA 98405-4238, USA. tom.egnew@multicare.org
Source
J Palliat Med. 2009 Oct;12(10):929-35
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alaska
Clinical Competence
Data Collection
Education, Medical, Graduate
Empathy
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Idaho
Male
Middle Aged
Montana
Physician-Patient Relations
Pilot Projects
Schools, Medical
Social Perception
Software
Students, Medical
Washington
Abstract
The relief of suffering is a fundamental goal of medicine, but what medical students are taught about suffering has been largely unexplored.
This pilot study explored the perceptions of physicians in postgraduate training of their medical school education about suffering.
Survey research involving physicians in postgraduate family medicine training programs.
One hundred eighty-four of 304 surveys were returned for a response rate of 61%. Respondents perceived significant gaps in their education about the understanding and diagnosis of suffering and in their preparation to deal with the feelings engendered by caring for suffering patients. Respondents generally perceived that they were prepared to interact with suffering patients and were taught that the relief of suffering is an inherent function of being a physician, but perceived that more explicit teaching about suffering would have better prepared them for residency training.
Perceptions of the teaching about suffering at the medical school level are quite variable with significant curricular gaps in student instruction about suffering and its relief.
PubMed ID
19807238 View in PubMed
Less detail

Predicting first-quarter test scores from the new Medical College Admission Test.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature245800
Source
J Med Educ. 1980 May;55(5):393-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1980
Author
T J Cullen
C W Dohner
P D Peckham
W E Samson
M R Schwarz
Source
J Med Educ. 1980 May;55(5):393-8
Date
May-1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achievement
Alaska
Educational Measurement
Humans
Idaho
Montana
Prospective Studies
School Admission Criteria
Schools, Medical
Washington
Abstract
The predictive validity of the new Medical College Admission Test as it relates to end-of-quarter examinations in anatomy, histology, physiology, biochemistry, and "ages of man" is presented. It is recognized that the maximum predictive power is attenuated by the reliability of the criterion variables. To determine the value of attempting to increase the reliability in the criteria, the authors corrected the validity coefficients for attenutation. Regression analyses were also undertaken to examine the extent to which the new MCAT subtests can predict scores on end-of-quarter examinations. Results indicate that the Science Knowledge assessment areas of chemistry and physics and the Science Problems subtest were the most useful in predicting student performance, followed by the Skills Analysis: Quantitative and Skills Analysis: Reading subtests and the biology area of the Science Knowledge subtest.
PubMed ID
7381877 View in PubMed
Less detail

WAMI, a decentralized medical education program in Washington Alaska, Montana, and Idaho.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300662
Source
Public Health Reports. 1975 Jul-Aug;90(4):308-12.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1975