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Source
[Seattle, Wash. : WAMI Program, School of Medicine, University of Washington] v.
Publication Type
Journal
Date
-1981
Source
[Seattle, Wash. : WAMI Program, School of Medicine, University of Washington] v.
Date
-1981
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Journal
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Medical education -- Washington (state) -- Periodicals
Medical education -- Alaska -- Periodicals
Medical education -- Montana -- Periodicals
Medical education -- Idaho -- Periodicals
Notes
ALASKA R746.A4A4 (1978-79)
Merged with Idaho state report, WAMI Program; Montana state report, WAMI Program; and Washington state report, WAMI Program; top form: Annual WAMI state report
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Communications satellites in health education and health care provision. The WAMI experience.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3054
Source
JAMA. 1983 Aug 5;250(5):636-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-5-1983
Author
M R Schwarz
D C Schaad
F W Evans
C W Dohner
Source
JAMA. 1983 Aug 5;250(5):636-9
Date
Aug-5-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Audiovisual Aids - utilization
Communication
Delivery of Health Care
Education, Medical, Undergraduate
Idaho
Montana
Regional Medical Programs
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Telecommunications - instrumentation - methods
Washington
Abstract
Since 1971, the University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, has operated a four-state, medical education program covering Washington, Alaska, Montana, and Idaho. This WAMI Program involves four universities without medical schools and 15 communities. To maintain this program, communication between the sites is imperative and mandates travel. The experiments described in this article were undertaken to determine whether full-duplex audio and color-video interactions via communications satellites could replace the travel requirements of the WAMI Program. Experiments involving the administration of the program, the presentation of the undergraduate medical education curriculum, the provision of health services, and the formation of public policies were conducted. The results suggest that satellite communication has broad applicability in medical education and health care provision.
PubMed ID
6191052 View in PubMed
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Community based studies of diabetes control: program development and preliminary analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3260
Source
J Fam Pract. 1982 Mar;14(3):459-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1982
Author
C K Smith
T R Taylor
M J Gordon
Source
J Fam Pract. 1982 Mar;14(3):459-67
Date
Mar-1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Oral
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alaska
Ambulatory Care
Blood Glucose - analysis
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Diabetes Mellitus - drug therapy - epidemiology - prevention & control
Evaluation Studies
Family Practice
Female
Humans
Hypoglycemic agents - therapeutic use
Idaho
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Insulin - therapeutic use
Male
Middle Aged
Montana
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Time Factors
Washington
Abstract
In this report are examined the patterns of control of diabetes mellitus achieved by practicing family physicians in small communities in the Pacific Northwest and Alaska. The diabetic patients under study appear to be broadly similar to patients in tertiary care settings, where most studies of diabetes care have been carried out. Motivated, competent family physicians, knowledgeable about tight control of diabetes, appear to have considerable difficulty in maintaining even modest levels of biochemical control. Goals in this study for fasting plasma glucose levels for patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) averaged between 120 and 160 mg/100 ml. Glucose levels actually achieved ranged up to 360 mg/100 ml. A similar though lesser discrepancy was noted for patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM), with achieved levels ranging up to 270 mg/100 ml fasting plasma glucose. There were wide individual differences among physicians in management styles and treatment policy, including wide discrepancies in emphasis on diet, use of oral hypoglycemic agents, and insulin use. This diversity is felt to merit further investigation. Collaborative studies of this type with community based physicians are feasible and academically rewarding. Significant research questions can be addressed and answered.U
PubMed ID
7038027 View in PubMed
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Geographic and specialty distributions of WAMI Program participants and nonparticipants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature234618
Source
J Med Educ. 1987 Oct;62(10):810-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1987
Author
R J Adkins
G R Anderson
T J Cullen
W W Myers
F S Newman
M R Schwarz
Author Affiliation
Washington State University, Pullman.
Source
J Med Educ. 1987 Oct;62(10):810-7
Date
Oct-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Clinical Clerkship
Education, Medical
Humans
Idaho
Medically underserved area
Medicine
Montana
Physicians - supply & distribution
Professional Practice Location
Specialization
Washington
Abstract
In an effort to make the geographic distribution of physicians closer to the distribution of the population as a whole, in 1971 the states of Washington, Alaska, Montana, and Idaho established the WAMI Program. In a departure from the Flexnerian model of medical education, the WAMI Program was organized to distribute the components of medical education throughout the region, both at the medical center at the University of Washington School of Medicine and at remote sites. In the present article, the authors describe the results of the first seven years of the program (1975-1981) in terms of the geographic and specialty distribution of the school's graduates before and after the establishment of the program. At the time of the study, 23 percent of the graduates with WAMI Program experience practiced in nonmetropolitan areas as defined by the U.S. Bureau of the Census. Only 13 percent of all U.S. physicians practiced in such areas in 1981, while 24 percent of the U.S. population lived there. In addition, 61 percent of the graduates with program experience were in primary care practice in contrast to 35 percent of all U.S. physicians. If all U.S. physicians behaved as these graduates do, the distribution of U.S. physicians would be reversed, with the proportion of physicians practicing primary care in nonmetropolitan areas being larger than the proportion of the population living in those areas.
PubMed ID
3656382 View in PubMed
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Predicting first-quarter test scores from the new Medical College Admission Test.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature245800
Source
J Med Educ. 1980 May;55(5):393-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1980
Author
T J Cullen
C W Dohner
P D Peckham
W E Samson
M R Schwarz
Source
J Med Educ. 1980 May;55(5):393-8
Date
May-1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achievement
Alaska
Educational Measurement
Humans
Idaho
Montana
Prospective Studies
School Admission Criteria
Schools, Medical
Washington
Abstract
The predictive validity of the new Medical College Admission Test as it relates to end-of-quarter examinations in anatomy, histology, physiology, biochemistry, and "ages of man" is presented. It is recognized that the maximum predictive power is attenuated by the reliability of the criterion variables. To determine the value of attempting to increase the reliability in the criteria, the authors corrected the validity coefficients for attenutation. Regression analyses were also undertaken to examine the extent to which the new MCAT subtests can predict scores on end-of-quarter examinations. Results indicate that the Science Knowledge assessment areas of chemistry and physics and the Science Problems subtest were the most useful in predicting student performance, followed by the Skills Analysis: Quantitative and Skills Analysis: Reading subtests and the biology area of the Science Knowledge subtest.
PubMed ID
7381877 View in PubMed
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