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Activity and diversity of methane-oxidizing bacteria along a Norwegian sub-Arctic glacier forefield.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299197
Source
FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2018 05 01; 94(5):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
05-01-2018
Author
Alejandro Mateos-Rivera
Lise Øvreås
Bryan Wilson
Jacob C Yde
Kai W Finster
Author Affiliation
Department of Biology, University of Bergen, NO-5020, Bergen, Norway.
Source
FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2018 05 01; 94(5):
Date
05-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Biodiversity
High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing
Ice Cover - microbiology
Methane - metabolism
Methylococcaceae - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Norway
Soil Microbiology
Abstract
Methane (CH4) is one of the most abundant greenhouse gases in the atmosphere and identification of its sources and sinks is crucial for the reliability of climate model outputs. Although CH4 production and consumption rates have been reported from a broad spectrum of environments, data obtained from glacier forefields are restricted to a few locations. We report the activities of methanotrophic communities and their diversity along a chronosequence in front of a sub-Arctic glacier using high-throughput sequencing and gas flux measurements. CH4 oxidation rates were measured in the field throughout the growing season during three sampling times at eight different sampling points in combination with laboratory incubation experiments. The overall results showed that the methanotrophic community had similar trends of increased CH4 consumption and increased abundance as a function of soil development and time of year. Sequencing results revealed that the methanotrophic community was dominated by a few OTUs and that a short-term increase in CH4 concentration, as performed in the field measurements, altered slightly the relative abundance of the OTUs.
PubMed ID
29617984 View in PubMed
Less detail

Bacterial Microbiota Associated with the Glacier Ice Worm Is Dominated by Both Worm-Specific and Glacier-Derived Facultative Lineages.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281829
Source
Microbes Environ. 2017 Mar 31;32(1):32-39
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-31-2017
Author
Takumi Murakami
Takahiro Segawa
Roman Dial
Nozomu Takeuchi
Shiro Kohshima
Yuichi Hongoh
Source
Microbes Environ. 2017 Mar 31;32(1):32-39
Date
Mar-31-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Animals
Bacteria - classification - genetics
Biota
Cluster analysis
DNA, Bacterial - chemistry - genetics
DNA, Ribosomal - chemistry - genetics
Ice Cover - microbiology
Oligochaeta - microbiology
Phylogeny
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S - genetics
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Abstract
The community structure of bacteria associated with the glacier ice worm Mesenchytraeus solifugus was analyzed by amplicon sequencing of 16S rRNA genes and their transcripts. Ice worms were collected from two distinct glaciers in Alaska, Harding Icefield and Byron Glacier, and glacier surfaces were also sampled for comparison. Marked differences were observed in bacterial community structures between the ice worm and glacier surface samples. Several bacterial phylotypes were detected almost exclusively in the ice worms, and these bacteria were phylogenetically affiliated with either animal-associated lineages or, interestingly, clades mostly consisting of glacier-indigenous species. The former included bacteria that belong to Mollicutes, Chlamydiae, Rickettsiales, and Lachnospiraceae, while the latter included Arcicella and Herminiimonas phylotypes. Among these bacteria enriched in ice worm samples, Mollicutes, Arcicella, and Herminiimonas phylotypes were abundantly and consistently detected in the ice worm samples; these phylotypes constituted the core microbiota associated with the ice worm. A fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis showed that Arcicella cells specifically colonized the epidermis of the ice worms. Other bacterial phylotypes detected in the ice worm samples were also abundantly recovered from the respective habitat glaciers; these bacteria may be food for ice worms to digest or temporary residents. Nevertheless, some were overrepresented in the ice worm RNA samples; they may also function as facultative gut bacteria. Our results indicate that the community structure of bacteria associated with ice worms is distinct from that in the associated glacier and includes worm-specific and facultative, glacier-indigenous lineages.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28302989 View in PubMed
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Bacterial responses to fluctuations and extremes in temperature and brine salinity at the surface of Arctic winter sea ice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257926
Source
FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2014 Aug;89(2):476-89
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Marcela Ewert
Jody W Deming
Author Affiliation
School of Oceanography, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
Source
FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2014 Aug;89(2):476-89
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Arctic Regions
Cold Temperature
Freezing
Gammaproteobacteria - physiology
Ice Cover - microbiology
Salinity
Salt-Tolerance
Seasons
Seawater - chemistry - microbiology
Snow - microbiology
Abstract
Wintertime measurements near Barrow, Alaska, showed that bacteria near the surface of first-year sea ice and in overlying saline snow experience more extreme temperatures and salinities, and wider fluctuations in both parameters, than bacteria deeper in the ice. To examine impacts of such conditions on bacterial survival, two Arctic isolates with different environmental tolerances were subjected to winter-freezing conditions, with and without the presence of organic solutes involved in osmoprotection: proline, choline, or glycine betaine. Obligate psychrophile Colwellia psychrerythraea strain 34H suffered cell losses under all treatments, with maximal loss after 15-day exposure to temperatures fluctuating between -7 and -25 °C. Osmoprotectants significantly reduced the losses, implying that salinity rather than temperature extremes presents the greater stress for this organism. In contrast, psychrotolerant Psychrobacter sp. strain 7E underwent miniaturization and fragmentation under both fluctuating and stable-freezing conditions, with cell numbers increasing in most cases, implying a different survival strategy that may include enhanced dispersal. Thus, the composition and abundance of the bacterial community that survives in winter sea ice may depend on the extent to which overlying snow buffers against extreme temperature and salinity conditions and on the availability of solutes that mitigate osmotic shock, especially during melting.
PubMed ID
24903191 View in PubMed
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Biodegradation of marine oil spills in the Arctic with a Greenland perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294972
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2018 Jun 01; 626:1243-1258
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Date
Jun-01-2018
Author
Leendert Vergeynst
Susse Wegeberg
Jens Aamand
Pia Lassen
Ulrich Gosewinkel
Janne Fritt-Rasmussen
Kim Gustavson
Anders Mosbech
Author Affiliation
Arctic Research Centre, Department of Bioscience, Aarhus University, Denmark. Electronic address: leendert.vergeynst@bios.au.dk.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2018 Jun 01; 626:1243-1258
Date
Jun-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Bacteria - metabolism
Biodegradation, Environmental
Greenland
Ice Cover - microbiology
Petroleum - metabolism
Petroleum Pollution - analysis
Seawater - chemistry - microbiology
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis - metabolism
Abstract
New economic developments in the Arctic, such as shipping and oil exploitation, bring along unprecedented risks of marine oil spills. Microorganisms have played a central role in degrading and reducing the impact of the spilled oil during past oil disasters. However, in the Arctic, and in particular in its pristine areas, the self-cleaning capacity and biodegradation potential of the natural microbial communities have yet to be uncovered. This review compiles and investigates the current knowledge with respect to environmental parameters and biochemical constraints that control oil biodegradation in the Arctic. Hereby, seawaters off Greenland are considered as a case study. Key factors for biodegradation include the bioavailability of hydrocarbons, the presence of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria and the availability of nutrients. We show how these key factors may be influenced by the physical oceanographic conditions in seawaters off Greenland and other environmental parameters including low temperature, sea ice, sunlight regime, suspended sediment plumes and phytoplankton blooms that characterize the Arctic. Based on the acquired insights, a first qualitative assessment of the biodegradation potential in seawaters off Greenland is presented. In addition to the most apparent Arctic characteristics, such as low temperature and sea ice, the impact of typical Arctic features such as the oligotrophic environment, poor microbial adaptation to hydrocarbon degradation, mixing of stratified water masses, and massive phytoplankton blooms and suspended sediment plumes merit to be topics of future investigation.
PubMed ID
29898532 View in PubMed
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The biogeography of red snow microbiomes and their role in melting arctic glaciers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294854
Source
Nat Commun. 2016 06 22; 7:11968
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
06-22-2016
Author
Stefanie Lutz
Alexandre M Anesio
Rob Raiswell
Arwyn Edwards
Rob J Newton
Fiona Gill
Liane G Benning
Author Affiliation
Cohen Laboratories, School of Earth and Environment, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK.
Source
Nat Commun. 2016 06 22; 7:11968
Date
06-22-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Bacteria - classification
Biodiversity
Biomass
Chlorophyta - classification
Climate change
Fatty acids
Freezing
Geography
Greenland
Ice Cover - microbiology
Iceland
Microbiota
Pigmentation
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S - genetics
Seasons
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Snow - microbiology
Species Specificity
Sweden
Abstract
The Arctic is melting at an unprecedented rate and key drivers are changes in snow and ice albedo. Here we show that red snow, a common algal habitat blooming after the onset of melting, plays a crucial role in decreasing albedo. Our data reveal that red pigmented snow algae are cosmopolitan as well as independent of location-specific geochemical and mineralogical factors. The patterns for snow algal diversity, pigmentation and, consequently albedo, are ubiquitous across the Arctic and the reduction in albedo accelerates snow melt and increases the time and area of exposed bare ice. We estimated that the overall decrease in snow albedo by red pigmented snow algal blooms over the course of one melt season can be 13%. This will invariably result in higher melt rates. We argue that such a 'bio-albedo' effect has to be considered in climate models.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27329445 View in PubMed
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The characterization of Helicobacter pylori DNA associated with ancient human remains recovered from a Canadian glacier.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136637
Source
PLoS One. 2011;6(2):e16864
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Treena Swanston
Monique Haakensen
Harry Deneer
Ernest G Walker
Author Affiliation
Department of Archaeology and Anthropology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada. treena.swanston@usask.ca
Source
PLoS One. 2011;6(2):e16864
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Autopsy
Base Sequence
Canada
DNA, Bacterial - analysis
Helicobacter Infections - history - microbiology - pathology
Helicobacter pylori - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
History, Ancient
Humans
Ice Cover - microbiology
Molecular Sequence Data
Phylogeny
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Stomach - microbiology - pathology
Abstract
Helicobacter pylori is a gram-negative bacterium that colonizes the stomach of nearly half of the world's population. Genotypic characterization of H. pylori strains involves the analysis of virulence-associated genes, such as vacA, which has multiple alleles. Previous phylogenetic analyses have revealed a connection between modern H. pylori strains and the movement of ancient human populations. In this study, H. pylori DNA was amplified from the stomach tissue of the Kwäday Dän Ts'ìnchi individual. This ancient individual was recovered from the Samuel Glacier in Tatshenshini-Alsek Park, British Columbia, Canada on the traditional territory of the Champagne and Aishihik First Nations and radiocarbon dated to a timeframe of approximately AD 1670 to 1850. This is the first ancient H. pylori strain to be characterized with vacA sequence data. The Tatshenshini H. pylori strain has a potential hybrid vacA m2a/m1d middle (m) region allele and a vacA s2 signal (s) region allele. A vacA s2 allele is more commonly identified with Western strains, and this suggests that European strains were present in northwestern Canada during the ancient individual's time. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the vacA m1d region of the ancient strain clusters with previously published novel Native American strains that are closely related to Asian strains. This indicates a past connection between the Kwäday Dän Ts'ìnchi individual and the ancestors who arrived in the New World thousands of years ago.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21359221 View in PubMed
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Comparative evaluation of the indigenous microbial diversity vs. drilling fluid contaminants in the NEEM Greenland ice core.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257989
Source
FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2014 Aug;89(2):238-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Vanya Miteva
Caroline Burlingame
Todd Sowers
Jean Brenchley
Author Affiliation
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, USA.
Source
FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2014 Aug;89(2):238-56
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actinobacteria - genetics - isolation & purification
Ascomycota - genetics - isolation & purification
Basidiomycota - genetics - isolation & purification
Biodiversity
DNA Contamination
Environmental Microbiology
Genes, Bacterial
Genes, Fungal
Greenland
Ice
Ice Cover - microbiology
Molecular Sequence Data
Molecular Typing
Phylogeny
Proteobacteria - genetics - isolation & purification
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S - genetics
Abstract
Demonstrating that the detected microbial diversity in nonaseptically drilled deep ice cores is truly indigenous is challenging because of potential contamination with exogenous microbial cells. The NEEM Greenland ice core project provided a first-time opportunity to determine the origin and extent of contamination throughout drilling. We performed multiple parallel cultivation and culture-independent analyses of five decontaminated ice core samples from different depths (100-2051 m), the drilling fluid and its components Estisol and Coasol, and the drilling chips collected during drilling. We created a collection of diverse bacterial and fungal isolates (84 from the drilling fluid and its components, 45 from decontaminated ice, and 66 from drilling chips). Their categorization as contaminants or intrinsic glacial ice microorganisms was based on several criteria, including phylogenetic analyses, genomic fingerprinting, phenotypic characteristics, and presence in drilling fluid, chips, and/or ice. Firmicutes and fungi comprised the dominant group of contaminants among isolates and cloned rRNA genes. Conversely, most Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria originating from the ice were identified as intrinsic. This study provides a database of potential contaminants useful for future studies of NEEM cores and can contribute toward developing standardized protocols for contamination detection and ensuring the authenticity of the microbial diversity in deep glacial ice.
PubMed ID
24450335 View in PubMed
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Comparative metagenome analysis of an Alaskan glacier.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257944
Source
J Bioinform Comput Biol. 2014 Apr;12(2):1441003
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Sulbha Choudhari
Ruchi Lohia
Andrey Grigoriev
Author Affiliation
Center for Computational and Integrative Biology, Rutgers University, Camden, 315 Penn St, Camden NJ 08102, USA.
Source
J Bioinform Comput Biol. 2014 Apr;12(2):1441003
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Bacteria - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Base Sequence
Ice Cover - microbiology
Metagenome - genetics
Microbial Consortia - genetics
Molecular Sequence Data
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S - genetics
Abstract
The temperature in the Arctic region has been increasing in the recent past accompanied by melting of its glaciers. We took a snapshot of the current microbial inhabitation of an Alaskan glacier (which can be considered as one of the simplest possible ecosystems) by using metagenomic sequencing of 16S rRNA recovered from ice/snow samples. Somewhat contrary to our expectations and earlier estimates, a rich and diverse microbial population of more than 2,500 species was revealed including several species of Archaea that has been identified for the first time in the glaciers of the Northern hemisphere. The most prominent bacterial groups found were Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Firmicutes. Firmicutes were not reported in large numbers in a previously studied Alpine glacier but were dominant in an Antarctic subglacial lake. Representatives of Cyanobacteria, Actinobacteria and Planctomycetes were among the most numerous, likely reflecting the dependence of the ecosystem on the energy obtained through photosynthesis and close links with the microbial community of the soil. Principal component analysis (PCA) of nucleotide word frequency revealed distinct sequence clusters for different taxonomic groups in the Alaskan glacier community and separate clusters for the glacial communities from other regions of the world. Comparative analysis of the community composition and bacterial diversity present in the Byron glacier in Alaska with other environments showed larger overlap with an Arctic soil than with a high Arctic lake, indicating patterns of community exchange and suggesting that these bacteria may play an important role in soil development during glacial retreat.
PubMed ID
24712530 View in PubMed
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Complete genome of Marinobacter psychrophilus strain 20041(T) isolated from sea-ice of the Canadian Basin.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282526
Source
Mar Genomics. 2016 Aug;28:1-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2016
Author
Lai Song
Lufeng Ren
Li Wang
Yong Yu
Xumin Wang
Guiming Liu
Source
Mar Genomics. 2016 Aug;28:1-3
Date
Aug-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Canada
Genome, Bacterial
Ice Cover - microbiology
Marinobacter - classification - genetics
Phylogeny
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Abstract
Marinobacter psychrophilus strain 20041(T) was isolated from sea-ice of the Canadian Basin. Here we report the complete sequence of the 3.9-Mb genome of this strain. The complete genome sequence will facilitate the study of the physiology and evolution of Marinobacter species.
PubMed ID
26908308 View in PubMed
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Coupled cryoconite ecosystem structure-function relationships are revealed by comparing bacterial communities in alpine and Arctic glaciers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257994
Source
FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2014 Aug;89(2):222-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Arwyn Edwards
Luis A J Mur
Susan E Girdwood
Alexandre M Anesio
Marek Stibal
Sara M E Rassner
Katherina Hell
Justin A Pachebat
Barbara Post
Jennifer S Bussell
Simon J S Cameron
Gareth Wyn Griffith
Andrew J Hodson
Birgit Sattler
Author Affiliation
Institute of Biological, Rural and Environmental Sciences, Aberystwyth University, Aberystwyth, UK.
Source
FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2014 Aug;89(2):222-37
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Austria
Biodiversity
Cyanobacteria - genetics - metabolism
Geologic Sediments - microbiology
Greenland
High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing
Ice Cover - microbiology
Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length
Proteobacteria - genetics - metabolism
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared
Svalbard
Abstract
Cryoconite holes are known as foci of microbial diversity and activity on polar glacier surfaces, but are virtually unexplored microbial habitats in alpine regions. In addition, whether cryoconite community structure reflects ecosystem functionality is poorly understood. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism and Fourier transform infrared metabolite fingerprinting of cryoconite from glaciers in Austria, Greenland and Svalbard demonstrated cryoconite bacterial communities are closely correlated with cognate metabolite fingerprints. The influence of bacterial-associated fatty acids and polysaccharides was inferred, underlining the importance of bacterial community structure in the properties of cryoconite. Thus, combined application of T-RFLP and FT-IR metabolite fingerprinting promises high throughput, and hence, rapid assessment of community structure-function relationships. Pyrosequencing revealed Proteobacteria were particularly abundant, with Cyanobacteria likely acting as ecosystem engineers in both alpine and Arctic cryoconite communities. However, despite these generalities, significant differences in bacterial community structures, compositions and metabolomes are found between alpine and Arctic cryoconite habitats, reflecting the impact of local and regional conditions on the challenges of thriving in glacial ecosystems.
PubMed ID
24433483 View in PubMed
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47 records – page 1 of 5.