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[Accidental hypothermia. 2 case reports]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57293
Source
Lakartidningen. 1993 Jun 2;90(22):2157-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2-1993

[Accidental hypothermia from immersion]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57314
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1985 Aug 5;147(32):2503-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-5-1985
Author
P E Jørgensen
B. Jessen
L. Vanggaard
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1985 Aug 5;147(32):2503-8
Date
Aug-5-1985
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
English Abstract
Humans
Hypothermia - etiology - physiopathology - therapy
Immersion
PubMed ID
4060318 View in PubMed
Less detail

Endotoxin response in spontaneously hypertensive rats: a role of the TNFalpha-gene region.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57273
Source
Folia Biol (Praha). 1999;45(1):3-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
Z. Pausova
J. Kunes
V. Kren
D. Krenová
M. Pravenec
J. Tremblay
P. Hamet
Author Affiliation
Centre Hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal, Canada.
Source
Folia Biol (Praha). 1999;45(1):3-6
Date
1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Animals, Congenic
Chromosome Mapping
Comparative Study
Endotoxemia - complications - genetics - physiopathology
Fever - etiology - physiopathology
Gene Expression Regulation
Hypothermia - etiology - physiopathology
Rats
Rats, Inbred SHR - genetics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha - biosynthesis - genetics
Abstract
We have shown previously that administration of endotoxin induces a smaller decrease of body temperature in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) than in normotensive Brown Norway (BN) rats. Several studies have suggested that tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) is one of the mediators of the body-temperature response to endotoxin. To test whether the TNFalpha gene could be involved in determination of the observed difference in the body-temperature response to endotoxin, we studied SHR (n = 6) and a congenic strain, SHR.1N (n = 5), which differs from SHR by a segment of chromosome 20 originating from BN and containing the TNFalpha gene. Body temperature was recorded continuously by means of radiotelemetry. We showed that, in both strains, an intraperitoneal injection of endotoxin (500 microg/kg of body weight) induces a rapid hyperthermic phase (20-40 minutes post-injection), which is followed, first, by a hypothermic phase (100-120 minutes post-injection) and, then, by a late hyperthermic phase (seven hours). Although both strains demonstrated a similar trend in the response, a significant difference was observed between the two response curves (P = 0.0001). Further analysis at each time point revealed that the two strains differed significantly at a peak of the hypothermic phase (P = 0.035) and the late hyperthermic phase (P = 0.035). In conclusion, these data indicate that the differential chromosomal segment of SHR.1N contains a gene(s) causally related to the body-temperature response to endotoxin. In the light of previously published data, the TNFalpha gene appears to be the most likely candidate gene within the segment.
PubMed ID
10732711 View in PubMed
Less detail

The impact of perioperative warming in an outpatient aesthetic surgery setting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122999
Source
Aesthet Surg J. 2012 Jul;32(5):613-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
Frank Lista
Chris D Doherty
Richard M Backstein
Jamil Ahmad
Author Affiliation
Division of Plastic Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Aesthet Surg J. 2012 Jul;32(5):613-20
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Ambulatory Surgical Procedures - adverse effects
Analgesics, Opioid - therapeutic use
Anesthesia Recovery Period
Bedding and Linens
Body Temperature Regulation
Clothing
Female
Fentanyl - therapeutic use
Heating
Humans
Hypothermia - etiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Length of Stay
Male
Ontario
Pain, Postoperative - etiology - prevention & control
Patient Discharge
Perioperative Care
Reconstructive Surgical Procedures - adverse effects
Retrospective Studies
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Perioperative hypothermia can lead to surgical complications, including bleeding, infection, increased patient discomfort, and longer recovery time. Plastic surgeons have become increasingly aware of this important patient safety issue.
The authors evaluate the impact of perioperative warming in an outpatient plastic surgery setting.
A retrospective review was performed of 108 patients who received several simple measures to prevent perioperative hypothermia. Patients dressed in warm clothing and were covered with an electric blanket in both the holding area and the recovery room. Intraoperative interventions included higher ambient room temperature, skin exposure only at the surgical site, forced-air warming, and the use of warmed fluids. This warmed group was compared with a historical control group of 106 patients who underwent plastic surgery in the period immediately before implementation of these measures. Patient demographics and procedural characteristics were similar for the 2 groups.
The requirement for intraoperative analgesia was significantly lower for the warmed group (111 vs 125 µg fentanyl in the control group; P = .042). Patients in the warmed group required less time in the recovery room and met discharge criteria sooner (127 vs 141 minutes; P = .001). No significant difference was observed in the incidence of complications.
Simple measures to maintain perioperative normothermia improve patient comfort and recovery following aesthetic surgery. Through a continuous-improvement culture, the authors have successfully implemented warming strategies that prevent perioperative hypothermia and improve surgical outcomes.
Notes
Comment In: Aesthet Surg J. 2012 Jul;32(5):62122745451
PubMed ID
22745450 View in PubMed
Less detail

Poikilothermia in a 68-year-old female. A risk factor for accidental hypothermia, or hyperthermia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57305
Source
Q J Med. 1989 Feb;70(262):103-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1989
Author
J. Allen
K. Boyd
S A Hawkins
D R Hadden
Author Affiliation
Physiology Department, Queen's University of Belfast.
Source
Q J Med. 1989 Feb;70(262):103-12
Date
Feb-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Body Temperature Regulation
Climate
Female
Fever - etiology - physiopathology
Humans
Hypothermia - etiology - physiopathology
Risk factors
Abstract
A 68-year-old woman presented in wintertime in a cold climate with ataxia and numbness in her legs and was found to be profoundly hypothermic in hospital. No endocrine or neurological cause for hypothermia could be distinguished. Physiological investigation, including a sympathetic release test, exposure to gradually increasing environmental temperatures and prolonged exposure to a high temperature suggested she was at that time regulating her core temperature around a set value which was several degrees lower than normal. Metabolic rate was 42 per cent below the value predicted from standard tables. Further measurements over a one-month period in a warm climate suggested a poikilothermic temperature control mechanism, with a possible risk of environmental hyperthermia. No pathological basis for this disorder has yet been identified, but it is suggested that a small localized hypothalamic vascular event has occurred.
PubMed ID
2594952 View in PubMed
Less detail

Temperature management and monitoring practices during adult cardiac surgery under cardiopulmonary bypass: results of a Canadian national survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134381
Source
Perfusion. 2011 Sep;26(5):395-400
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
D. Belway
R. Tee
H J Nathan
F D Rubens
M. Boodhwani
Author Affiliation
Department of Perfusion Services, University of Ottawa Heart Institute, Ottawa, ON, Canada.
Source
Perfusion. 2011 Sep;26(5):395-400
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body temperature
Canada
Cardiac Surgical Procedures
Cardiopulmonary Bypass
Data Collection
Female
Humans
Hypothermia - etiology - physiopathology
Male
Monitoring, Intraoperative - methods
Abstract
Mild to moderate systemic hypothermia is commonly used as a cerebral protective strategy during adult cardiac surgery. The benefits of this strategy for routine cardiac surgery have been questioned and the adverse effects of hyperthermia demonstrated. The purpose of the present study was to examine current temperature management and monitoring practices during adult cardiac surgery using CPB in Canada.
Web-based survey referring to adult cases undergoing cardiac surgery using CPB without the use of deep hypothermic circulatory arrest. Thirty-two questionnaires were completed, representing a 100% response rate.
The usual management is to cool patients during CPB at 30 (94%) centers for low-risk (isolated primary CABG) cases and at 31 (97%) centers for high-risk (all other) cases. The average nadir temperature at the target site achieved on CPB is 34°C (range 28°C - 36°C). At 26 (81%) centers, patients are typically rewarmed to a target temperature between 36°C and 37°C before separation from CPB. Only 6 (19%) centers reported that thermistors and coupled devices used to monitor blood temperature are checked for accuracy or calibrated according to the product operating directive's schedule or more often.
Contemporary management of adult cardiac surgery under CPB still involves induction of mild to moderate systemic hypothermia. Significant practice variation exists across the country with respect to target temperatures for cooling and rewarming, as well as the site for temperature monitoring. This probably reflects the lack of definitive evidence. There is a need for well-conducted clinical trials to provide more robust evidence regarding temperature management.
PubMed ID
21593083 View in PubMed
Less detail

Thermal properties of handwear at varying altitudes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5769
Source
Aviat Space Environ Med. 2001 Jun;72(6):576-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2001
Author
W R Santee
L A Blanchard
Author Affiliation
Biophysics and Biomedical Modeling Division, US Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Natick, MA 01760-5007, USA. william.santee@ns.amedd.army.mil
Source
Aviat Space Environ Med. 2001 Jun;72(6):576-8
Date
Jun-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pressure
Altitude
Analysis of Variance
Convection
Gloves, Protective - classification - standards
Humans
Hypothermia - etiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Materials Testing
Military Medicine
Military Personnel
Models, Biological
Temperature
Thermodynamics
United States
Wind
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Total handwear insulation (I(T)) is dependent on the rate of heat transfer in air through the skin-handwear interface, handwear layers, and the surface boundary air layer. As altitude increases, the corresponding decrease in air pressure reduces convective heat loss. As convective heat losses decline, I(T), which is inversely related to the rate of heat loss, should increase. Increasing air velocity also reduces the insulation (Ia) provided by the boundary layer. METHODS: The military issue test handwear, Light-duty glove (LD), Trigger-finger mitten (TF), and Arctic mitten (AM), were fitted over a biophysical hand model. Model surface temperatures were 25 degrees C, and air temperature was 10 degrees C. The handwear was tested at simulated altitudes of sea level (101 kPa), 2500 m (75 kPa) and 5000 m (54 kPa) in still air and at 5 m x s(-1). RESULTS: Overall, the effects of wind and altitude on I(T) were significant. Differences for I(T) between 0 and 5000 m were significant for LD and TF. Increases in I(T) greater than 10% are considered of sufficient magnitude to alter comfort sensation. CONCLUSIONS: Differences of that magnitude occurred most frequently between 0 and 5000 m. The present results are consistent with an increase in I(T) with increasing altitude. Changes in I(T) were greater in still air and for less insulated handwear where the contribution of Ia to I(T) was more important.
PubMed ID
11396564 View in PubMed
Less detail

Work in the cold. Review of methods for assessment of cold exposure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51692
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 1993;65(3):147-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
I. Holmér
Author Affiliation
Division of Work and Environmental Physiology, National Institute of Occupational Health, Solna, Sweden.
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 1993;65(3):147-55
Date
1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acclimatization
Body Temperature Regulation - physiology
Cold - adverse effects
Cold Climate
Frostbite - etiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Humans
Hypothermia - etiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Occupational Diseases - etiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Protective Clothing
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Wind
Abstract
The obvious hazard of a cold exposure under natural as well as artificial conditions is tissue cooling and the associated sequel of more or less harmful effects from cold injury to discomfort. The nature, risk and magnitude of effects depend largely on the cooling effect, which results from the interaction of climatic factors (air temperature, mean radiant temperature, humidity and wind), protection (clothing) and metabolic heat production (activity). Assessment of cold stress should be based on methods which measure or predict this cooling effect in a relevant and reliable way. The nature of cooling encompasses (1) whole-body cooling, (2) extremity cooling, (3) convective cooling (wind chill), (4) conductive cooling (contact) and (5) airway cooling. The review contains a description of methods for evaluation of the various types of cold stress, as well as a discussion of their capacity and limitations. On the basis of selected methods, recommendations related to lowest permissible temperatures and other measures are discussed and compared with published data. Apparently, local cooling in most cases produces discomfort and harmful effects, before more significant whole-body cooling develops. With strong wind or movement at very low temperature, frostnip of unprotected skin may quickly develop. For most other conditions extremity (digit) cooling determines duration of exposure. However, as digit cooling largely depends on whole-body heat balance, it is important to control body cooling by selection and use of appropriate protective clothing.
PubMed ID
8282412 View in PubMed
Less detail

8 records – page 1 of 1.