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Estrogen receptor alpha single nucleotide polymorphism as predictor of diabetes type 2 risk in hypogonadal men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115457
Source
Aging Male. 2013 Jun;16(2):52-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Carl Linnér
Johan Svartberg
Aleksander Giwercman
Yvonne Lundberg Giwercman
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences, Molecular Genetic Reproductive Medicine, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden. carl.linner@med.lu.se
Source
Aging Male. 2013 Jun;16(2):52-7
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology
Alleles
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - diagnosis - epidemiology - genetics
Estrogen Receptor alpha - genetics
Gene Expression Regulation
Humans
Hypogonadism - diagnosis - epidemiology
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Polymerase Chain Reaction - methods
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Predictive value of tests
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Testosterone - blood
Abstract
Estradiol (E2) is, apart from its role as a reproductive hormone, also important for cardiac function and bone maturation in both genders. It has also been shown to play a role in insulin production, energy expenditure and in inducing lipolysis. The aim of the study was to investigate if low circulating testosterone or E2 levels in combination with variants in the estrogen receptor alpha (ESR1) and estrogen receptor beta (ESR2) genes were of importance for the risk of type-2 diabetes. The single nucleotide polymorphisms rs2207396 and rs1256049, in ESR1 and ESR2, respectively, were analysed by allele specific PCR in 172 elderly men from the population-based Tromsø study. The results were adjusted for age. In individuals with low total (=11?nmol/L) or free testosterone (=0.18?nmol/L) being carriers of the variant A-allele in ESR1 was associated with 7.3 and 15.9 times, respectively, increased odds ratio of being diagnosed with diabetes mellitus type 2 (p?=?0.025 and p?=?0.018, respectively). Lower concentrations of E2 did not seem to increase the risk of being diagnosed with diabetes. In conclusion, in hypogonadal men, the rs2207396 variant in ESR1 predicts the risk of type 2 diabetes.
PubMed ID
23506158 View in PubMed
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Measuring gonadotropins is of limited value in detecting hypogonadism in ageing men: the Tromsø study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature85241
Source
Int J Androl. 2007 Oct;30(5):445-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
Svartberg Johan
Jorde Rolf
Author Affiliation
Section of Endocrinology, Department of Medicine, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway. johan.svartberg@unn.no
Source
Int J Androl. 2007 Oct;30(5):445-51
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Gonadotropins - blood
Humans
Hypogonadism - diagnosis
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Norway
Abstract
Testosterone levels decrease with age. The mechanisms responsible for the age-related decrease in testosterone concentration are still being debated, and probably involve all three levels of the hypothalamo-pituitary-testicular axis. Luteinizing hormone (LH) concentration is often measured in combination with testosterone, but its value is questionable when considering the testosterone levels of older men. The objective of the present study was to examine the associations of endogenous gonadotropin and testosterone levels both in a cross-sectional cohort of 3447 men participating in the fifth Tromsø study and longitudinally in a cohort of 1352 men participating in both the fourth and the fifth Tromsø study. Total testosterone, LH, follicle-stimulating hormone and sex hormone-binding globulin levels were measured with immunoassay while free testosterone levels were calculated. Total testosterone and LH were independently and positively associated in the cross-sectional analyses (p
PubMed ID
17298550 View in PubMed
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Symptoms of testosterone deficiency in early middle aged men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125783
Source
Aging Male. 2012 Jun;15(2):78-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Anna-Clara E Spetz Holm
Mats G Fredrikson
Mats L Hammar
Author Affiliation
Obstetrics and Gynecology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden. anna-clara.spetz.holm@liu.se
Source
Aging Male. 2012 Jun;15(2):78-84
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alcohol Drinking
Data Collection
Humans
Hypogonadism - diagnosis - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Penile Erection
Sexual Dysfunction, Physiological - epidemiology - etiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Testosterone - deficiency
Abstract
Symptoms of testosterone deficiency and concentrations of testosterone (T) and bioavailable testosterone (BT) were studied in 35- and 45-year-old men.
A questionnaire, was sent to all 35- and 45-year-old men in Link?ping, Sweden (n=1998). The questionnaire has earlier been used for 55- to 75-year-old men and included demographic data, medical history, different symptoms possibly of T deficiency and the 10 questions from the "ADAM-questionnaire". Totally 200 men randomly selected among the men who answered the questionnaire were asked to give blood samples for analysis of T- and BT-concentrations.
A total of 38.7% of the questionnaires were returned and analysed, and 43.5% of the 200 randomly selected men gave blood samples. The older age group reported more symptoms that may be connected to low B and BT and had lower T- and BT-concentrations. Less strong erections and higher alcohol consumption were associated with lower concentrations of BT in 45-year-old men.
The burden of symptoms possibly related to low T concentrations were higher in 45-year-old men, and BT and T were lower. However, due to the low answer frequency and number of blood samples analyzed no general conclusions can be drawn.
PubMed ID
22455443 View in PubMed
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