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Academic skills in children with early-onset type 1 diabetes: the effects of diabetes-related risk factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124345
Source
Dev Med Child Neurol. 2012 May;54(5):457-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
Riitta Hannonen
Jorma Komulainen
Raili Riikonen
Timo Ahonen
Kenneth Eklund
Asko Tolvanen
Päivi Keskinen
Anja Nuuja
Author Affiliation
Department of Child Neurology, Kymenlaakso Central Hospital, Carea, Kotkantie 41, Kotka, Finland. riitta.hannonen@carea.fi
Source
Dev Med Child Neurol. 2012 May;54(5):457-63
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achievement
Child
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - diagnosis - therapy
Diabetic Ketoacidosis - diagnosis
Early Diagnosis
Educational Measurement
Female
Finland
Hospitals
Humans
Hypoglycemia - diagnosis
Learning Disorders - diagnosis
Male
Mathematics
Risk factors
Abstract
The study aimed to assess the effects of diabetes-related risk factors, especially severe hypoglycaemia,on the academic skills of children with early-onset type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM).
The study comprised 63 children with T1DM (31 females, 32 males; mean age 9 y 11 mo,SD 4 mo) and 92 comparison children without diabetes (40 females, 52 males;mean age 9 y 9 mo,SD 3 mo). Children were included if T1DM had been diagnosed before the age of 5 years and if they were aged between 9 and 10 years at the time of study. Children were not included if their native language was not Finnish and if they had a diagnosed neurological disorder that affected their cognitive development. Among the T1DM group, 37 had and 26 had not experienced severe hypoglycaemia and 26 had avoided severe hypoglycaemia. Severe hypoglycaemia, diabetic ketoacidosis(DKA), and glycaemic control were used as T1DM-related factors. Task performance in reading, spelling, and mathematics was compared among the three groups, and the effects of the T1DM-related factors were analysed with general linear models.
The groups with (p
Notes
Comment In: Dev Med Child Neurol. 2012 May;54(5):393-422590722
PubMed ID
22590723 View in PubMed
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Association between hypoglycaemia and impaired hypoglycaemia awareness and mortality in people with Type 1 diabetes mellitus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277244
Source
Diabet Med. 2016 Jan;33(1):77-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
A-S Sejling
B. Schouwenberg
L H Faerch
B. Thorsteinsson
B E de Galan
U. Pedersen-Bjergaard
Source
Diabet Med. 2016 Jan;33(1):77-83
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Cardiovascular Diseases - complications - epidemiology - mortality
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood - complications - therapy
Diabetic Angiopathies - complications - epidemiology - mortality
Diabetic Cardiomyopathies - complications - epidemiology - mortality
Diabetic Nephropathies - complications - epidemiology - mortality
Diagnostic Self Evaluation
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypoglycemia - diagnosis - mortality - physiopathology - prevention & control
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Netherlands - epidemiology
Outpatient Clinics, Hospital
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Registries
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Survival Analysis
Abstract
To examine whether severe hypoglycaemia and impaired hypoglycaemic awareness, a principal predictor of severe hypoglycaemia, are associated with all-cause mortality or cardiovascular mortality in Type 1 diabetes mellitus.
Mortality was recorded in two cohorts, one in Denmark (n = 269, follow-up 12 years) and one in the Netherlands (n = 482, follow-up 6.5 years). In both cohorts, awareness class was characterized and numbers of episodes of severe hypoglycaemia either during lifetime (Danish cohort) or during the preceding year (Dutch cohort) were recorded. In addition, episodes of severe hypoglycaemia were prospectively recorded every month for 1 year in the Danish cohort. Follow-up data regarding mortality were obtained through medical reports and registries (Danish cohort).
All-cause mortality was 14% (n = 39) in the Danish and 4% (n = 20) in the Dutch cohort. In either cohort, neither presence of episodes with severe hypoglycaemia nor impaired hypoglycaemia awareness were associated with increased mortality in age-truncated Cox proportional hazard regression models. Variables associated with increased risk of all-cause mortality in both cohorts were evidence of macrovascular disease and reduced kidney function.
Severe hypoglycaemia and hypoglycaemia unawareness are not associated with increased risk of all-cause or cardiovascular mortality in people with Type 1 diabetes mellitus.
PubMed ID
25997108 View in PubMed
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Carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1A deficiency: a look at classic and arctic variants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127371
Source
Adv Neonatal Care. 2012 Feb;12(1):23-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Deanna M Dykema
Author Affiliation
Children's Hospital Colarado, Aurora, Colorado 80045, USA. deanna.dykema@childrenscolorado.org
Source
Adv Neonatal Care. 2012 Feb;12(1):23-7
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Arctic Regions
Carnitine O-Palmitoyltransferase - deficiency - genetics
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Hypoglycemia - diagnosis - genetics - therapy
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Inuits
Lipid Metabolism, Inborn Errors - diagnosis - genetics - therapy
Neonatal Screening
Prenatal Diagnosis
Prognosis
Abstract
Carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1A (CPT-1A) deficiency is a defect of fatty acid metabolism that presents as an autosomal recessive inheritance. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1A is the rate-limiting enzyme that allows the body to process fats to provide energy during times of fasting and illness. Patients usually present between birth and 18 months of age following an illness with various symptoms including hypoketotic hypoglycemia, lethargy, and seizures. Diagnosis can be achieved through newborn metabolic screening. Long-term treatment is managed through dietary management. A milder form has been found to occur at a much higher incidence in the Inuit population. Since the recent discovery of CPT-1A deficiency, much is yet to be learned. Researchers are busy identifying and studying groups of people who are presenting with CPT-1A deficiency at significantly higher rates than the general population. This research will lead to a better understanding and future care of individuals diagnosed with CPT-1A deficiency.
PubMed ID
22301540 View in PubMed
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Determining the best method for first-line assessment of neonatal blood glucose levels.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58728
Source
J Paediatr Child Health. 2000 Aug;36(4):343-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2000
Author
C L Thomas
L. Critchley
M W Davies
Author Affiliation
Level 2 Special Care Baby Unit, Nambour General Hospital, Nambour, Queensland, Australia.
Source
J Paediatr Child Health. 2000 Aug;36(4):343-8
Date
Aug-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood Gas Analysis
Blood Glucose - analysis
Comparative Study
Electrochemistry - methods
Humans
Hypoglycemia - diagnosis
Infant, Newborn
Prospective Studies
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate and compare the accuracy and performance of two electrochemical glucose meters. To determine the user acceptability of these glucose meters and the ABL 620 Blood Gas Analyser (Radiometer, Copenhagen, Denmark) with an electrochemical glucose oxidase electrode for use in a Level 2 special care baby unit. METHODOLOGY: A total of 108 blood samples were collected from 47 babies at risk for hypoglycaemia. The blood glucose level was measured with two glucose meters, the Advantage Glucose Meter (Roche Diagnostics, Castle Hill, Australia) and the Precision-G Blood Glucose Testing System (Medisense, Melbourne, Australia), and the true blood glucose (TBG) measured with the ABL 620 blood gas analyser. Results from the glucose meters were compared with the TBG (as a percentage of the TBG). RESULTS: The mean (SD) percentage difference between the Advantage Glucose Meter and TBG was 4.5% (12. 5), and Precision-G Glucose Meter and TBG was 15.4% (12.4). The sample haematocrit did not significantly influence the glucose meter/TBG differences. There was an overall preference by the nursing staff for the Advantage Glucose Meter. CONCLUSIONS: The Advantage Glucose Meter was significantly more accurate than the Precision-G with similar precision. It was the preferred method of screening for neonatal hypoglycaemia.
PubMed ID
10940168 View in PubMed
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Source
Diabetologia. 1986 Jan;29(1):1-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1986
Author
D R Hadden
Source
Diabetologia. 1986 Jan;29(1):1-9
Date
Jan-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities - etiology - prevention & control
Animals
Blood glucose
Breast Feeding
Carbohydrate Metabolism
Denmark
Diabetic Nephropathies - therapy
Diabetic Retinopathy - therapy
Female
Great Britain
Humans
Hypoglycemia - diagnosis
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Insulin - administration & dosage
Monitoring, Physiologic
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications
Pregnancy Trimester, Third
Pregnancy in Diabetics - complications - diagnosis - therapy
Prenatal care - trends
Rats
Time Factors
Ultrasonography
Abstract
The art of obstetrics is not a subject which is often discussed in the pages of Diabetologia. However, as the care of the diabetic mother and her offspring is rightly an interdisciplinary responsibility between obstetrician, diabetologist and neonatologist, it is important that each has a close understanding of the various problems. Dr. M.I. Drury (Dublin), speaking as an internist, raises a question on the optimum time and method of delivery of the baby; this has more than purely obstetrical implications. Drs. L. Mølsted-Pedersen (Copenhagen) and C. Kühl (Copenhagen and Klampenborg), obstetrician and internist from the longest-established joint obstetric/diabetic service in the world, present a Scandinavian view on the management of pregnancy. Both centres have distinguished records in the management of diabetic pregnancy. The different viewpoints in Denmark and in Ireland are clear - in Copenhagen, therapeutic abortion is practiced in a pregnancy at risk of severe congenital malformation; in Dublin it is not. Dr. Drury quotes a perinatal loss of 13 of 285 pregnancies (4.5%) in the past 5 years, but does not include the recognised spontaneous abortions which, on his overall figures, are about 10% of conceptions. Dr. Mølsted-Pedersen reports a perinatal loss of 3 of 201 infants (1.5%), excluding 17 spontaneous and 9 induced abortions. If these 9 aborted pregnancies, which were performed due to a risk of severe congenital malformation, were included as fatalities, the Copenhagen figure would be 12 of 210 (5.5%). Of course, we do not know if all those 9 fetuses were affected. The spontaneous abortion rate was 17 of 223 (8.0%).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
3514340 View in PubMed
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Early postnatal hypoglycaemia in newborn infants of diabetic mothers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34031
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1997 Dec;86(12):1374-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1997
Author
E. Stenninger
J. Schollin
J. Aman
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, Orebro Medical Centre Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1997 Dec;86(12):1374-6
Date
Dec-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Blood Glucose - analysis
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - complications - drug therapy
Diabetes, Gestational - complications - drug therapy
Female
Fetal Blood - metabolism
Glucagon - analysis
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - analysis
Humans
Hypoglycemia - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Incidence
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Newborn, Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I - analysis
Male
Postnatal Care
Pregnancy
Pregnancy in Diabetics - complications - drug therapy
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
This study found that early postnatal hypoglycaemia was mainly induced by foetal hyperinsulinaemia, in close relation to maternal hyperglycaemia, even in well-controlled pregnancies of 59 mothers with insulin-treated diabetes mellitus, 29 with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and 30 with gestational diabetes mellitus. Ten of the newborn children (17%) had a blood glucose concentration below 1.0 mmol l(-1) at 2 h postnatally. Cord insulin-like growth factor-I or glucagon concentrations were not related to the early decline of blood glucose.
PubMed ID
9475319 View in PubMed
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ENETS Consensus Guidelines for the Standards of Care in Neuroendocrine Tumors: biochemical markers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148859
Source
Neuroendocrinology. 2009;90(2):194-202
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
2009

Family sues after negligence settlement against MD goes unpaid.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195303
Source
CMAJ. 2001 Mar 6;164(5):677
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-6-2001

High serum ACE activity predicts severe hypoglycaemia over time in patients with type 1 diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132478
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 2011 Nov;71(7):620-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2011
Author
Louise Færch
Ulrik Pedersen-Bjergaard
Birger Thorsteinsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology and Endocrinology H, Hillerød Hospital, Hillerød, Denmark. lof@hih.regionh.dk
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 2011 Nov;71(7):620-4
Date
Nov-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Biological Markers - blood
Denmark
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - complications - enzymology - physiopathology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypoglycemia - diagnosis - enzymology - etiology - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A - blood
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Abstract
High serum angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity is associated with increased risk of severe hypoglycaemia (SH) within 1 year in type 1 diabetes. We wanted to find out whether ACE activity is stable over time and predicts SH beyond 1 year, and if gender differences exist in the association between ACE activity and risk of SH.
A follow-up study of 128 adult patients with type 1 diabetes was conducted. At entry, ACE activity was measured. For 12 months, patients prospectively recorded events of severe hypoglycaemia (SH). At a median of 40 months, ACE activity was measured again and participants recalled the number of SH in the last year.
ACE activity is reproducible over 40 months (p
PubMed ID
21812638 View in PubMed
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14 records – page 1 of 2.