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Complementary and alternative medicine for treatment of irritable bowel syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152611
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2009 Feb;55(2):143-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2009
Author
Yi-Hao A Shen
Richard Nahas
Author Affiliation
Department of Family and Community Medicine at University of Ottawa in Ontario.
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2009 Feb;55(2):143-8
Date
Feb-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Complementary Therapies - methods - utilization
Dietary Supplements
Drugs, Chinese Herbal - therapeutic use
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypnosis - methods
Irritable Bowel Syndrome - diagnosis - therapy
Male
Ontario
Patient satisfaction
Phytotherapy - methods
Probiotics - therapeutic use
Quality of Life
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Risk assessment
Sensitivity and specificity
Sickness Impact Profile
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To review the evidence supporting selected complementary and alternative medicine approaches used in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).
MEDLINE (from January 1966), EMBASE (from January 1980), and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews were searched until March 2008, combining the terms irritable bowel syndrome or irritable colon with complementary therapies, alternative medicine, acupuncture, fiber, peppermint oil, herbal, traditional, yoga, massage, meditation, mind, relaxation, probiotic, hypnotherapy, psychotherapy, cognitive therapy, or behavior therapy. Results were screened to include only clinical trials, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses. Level I evidence was available for most interventions.
Soluble fibre improves constipation and global IBS symptoms. Peppermint oil alleviates IBS symptoms, including abdominal pain. Probiotic trials show overall benefit for IBS but there is little evidence supporting the use of any specific strain. Hypnotherapy and cognitive-behavioural therapy are also effective therapeutic options for appropriate patients. Certain herbal formulas are supported by limited evidence, but safety is a potential concern. All interventions are supported by systematic reviews or meta-analyses.
Several complementary and alternative therapies can be recommended as part of an evidence-based approach to the treatment of IBS; these might provide patients with satisfactory relief and improve the therapeutic alliance.
Notes
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Comment In: Can Fam Physician. 2009 Feb;55(2):126-7, 128-919221064
PubMed ID
19221071 View in PubMed
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Hypnosis Training and Education: Experiences with a Norwegian One-Year Education Course in Clinical Hypnosis for Children and Adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280936
Source
Am J Clin Hypn. 2017 Jan;59(3):282-291
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2017
Author
Maren Ø Lindheim
Helene Helgeland
Source
Am J Clin Hypn. 2017 Jan;59(3):282-291
Date
Jan-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Curriculum
Humans
Hypnosis - methods
Norway
Psychotherapy - education
Abstract
Although the efficacy of clinical hypnosis is well documented, its implementation in clinical practice is far from completed and there are few reports of systematic, professional training. This article gives a historical overview and description of a 1-year training program in clinical hypnosis which started in Norway in 2008 and has been held yearly since then. We describe the present education course with respect to aims, conceptual framework, structure, target groups, teaching themes, and experiences. The following factors have been considered of importance for the success of this program: The extent and duration of the course, the focus on demonstrations, experiential skill-building and exercises, and that the education is rooted in acknowledged clinical, academic, and educational environments. The participants' evaluations tell stories of mastery and positive experiences with hypnosis as a therapeutic tool in their clinical practice. However, many struggle to understand the various concepts of hypnosis, trance, and suggestions. Some find it hard to get started and challenging to integrate hypnosis in their clinical practice. Finally, some report scarce opportunities to apply their newly acquired skills at their work places and limited support by their leaders. The development of systematic, professional training programs as described in this article may be of importance for further implementation. However, this will also require that clinicians and leaders in universities and professional environments, and policymakers at higher levels, recognize clinical hypnosis as a valid and efficient choice of treatment. This must be reflected in dedicated efforts to ensure successful implementation in practice.
PubMed ID
27982780 View in PubMed
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Symboldrama, a psychotherapeutic method for adolescents with dissociative and PTSD symptoms: a pilot study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100543
Source
J Trauma Dissociation. 2010 Jul;11(3):308-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Doris Nilsson
Marie Wadsby
Author Affiliation
BUP-Elefanten, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Linkoping University, Linkoping, Sweden. doris.nilsson@liu.se
Source
J Trauma Dissociation. 2010 Jul;11(3):308-21
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child Abuse - psychology
Child Abuse, Sexual - psychology
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Dissociative Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Fantasy
Female
Humans
Hypnosis - methods
Imagery (Psychotherapy) - methods
Life Change Events
Male
Pilot Projects
Questionnaires
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Sweden
Translating
Abstract
A total of 15 clinically referred adolescents who had been sexually or physically abused participated in this pilot study of the use of symboldrama psychotherapy. Symboldrama is a psychotherapeutic method that uses imagery as the major psychotherapeutic tool. All adolescents reported to be suffering from a high level of dissociative symptoms and other symptoms such as anxiety, depression, posttraumatic stress, and anger after their traumas. The objective of the study was to test the hypothesis that symboldrama psychotherapy in addition to psycho-education of the non-offending parent would significantly reduce the reported symptoms. Before treatment, the participants answered three questionnaires: (a) the Life Incidence of Traumatic Events Scale, (b) the Trauma Symptom Checklist for Children, and (c) the Dissociation Questionnaire-Swedish version. After treatment, the participants once again filled out the Trauma Symptom Checklist for Children and the Dissociation Questionnaire-Swedish version. The scores from before and after treatment were compared, and the results showed that the symptoms had been statistically significantly reduced.
PubMed ID
20603765 View in PubMed
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