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2005 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations. New and important aspects of the sixth annual Canadian Hypertension Education Program's recommendations for management of hypertension.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174444
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2005 May;51:702-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2005

2008 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations: an annual update.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154273
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2008 Nov;54(11):1539-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2008

The 2009 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations for the management of hypertension: Part 1--blood pressure measurement, diagnosis and assessment of risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151165
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2009 May;25(5):279-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
Raj S Padwal
Brenda R Hemmelgarn
Nadia A Khan
Steven Grover
Donald W McKay
Thomas Wilson
Brian Penner
Ellen Burgess
Finlay A McAlister
Peter Bolli
Machael D Hill
Jeff Mahon
Martin G Myers
Carl Abbott
Ernesto L Schiffrin
George Honos
Karen Mann
Guy Tremblay
Alain Milot
Lyne Cloutier
Arun Chockalingam
Simon W Rabkin
Martin Dawes
Rhian M Touyz
Chaim Bell
Kevin D Burns
Marcel Ruzicka
Norman R C Campbell
Michel Vallée
Ramesh Prasad
Marcel Lebel
Sheldon W Tobe
Author Affiliation
Division of General Internal Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada. rpadwal@ualberta.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2009 May;25(5):279-86
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure Determination - standards
Canada
Clinical Competence
Combined Modality Therapy
Education, Medical, Continuing - standards
Female
Guideline Adherence
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - therapy
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Risk Management
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To provide updated, evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis and assessment of adults with hypertension.
The diagnosis of hypertension is dependent on appropriate blood pressure measurement, the timely assessment of serially elevated readings, the degree of blood pressure elevation, the method of measurement (office, ambulatory, home) and associated comorbidities. The presence of cardiovascular risk factors and target organ damage should be ascertained to assess global cardiovascular risk and determine the urgency, intensity and type of treatment required.
MEDLINE searches were conducted from November 2007 to October 2008 with the aid of a medical librarian. Reference lists were scanned, experts were contacted, and the personal files of authors and subgroup members were used to identify additional studies. Content and methodological experts assessed studies using prespecified, standardized evidence-based algorithms. Recommendations were based on evidence from peer-reviewed full-text articles only.
Recommendations for blood pressure measurement, criteria for hypertension diagnosis and follow-up, assessment of global cardiovascular risk, diagnostic testing, diagnosis of renovascular and endocrine causes of hypertension, home and ambulatory monitoring, and the use of echocardiography in hypertensive individuals are outlined. Key messages include continued emphasis on the expedited, accurate diagnosis of hypertension, the importance of global risk assessment and the need for ongoing monitoring of hypertensive patients to identify incident type 2 diabetes.
All recommendations were graded according to strength of the evidence and voted on by the 57 members of the Canadian Hypertension Education Program Evidence-Based Recommendations Task Force. All recommendations were required to be supported by at least 70% of task force members. These guidelines will continue to be updated annually.
Notes
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PubMed ID
19417858 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 2009 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations for the management of hypertension: Part 2--therapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151164
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2009 May;25(5):287-98
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
Nadia A Khan
Brenda Hemmelgarn
Robert J Herman
Chaim M Bell
Jeff L Mahon
Lawrence A Leiter
Simon W Rabkin
Michael D Hill
Raj Padwal
Rhian M Touyz
Pierre Larochelle
Ross D Feldman
Ernesto L Schiffrin
Norman R C Campbell
Gordon Moe
Ramesh Prasad
Malcolm O Arnold
Tavis S Campbell
Alain Milot
James A Stone
Charlotte Jones
Richard I Ogilvie
Pavel Hamet
George Fodor
George Carruthers
Kevin D Burns
Marcel Ruzicka
Jacques DeChamplain
George Pylypchuk
Robert Petrella
Jean-Martin Boulanger
Luc Trudeau
Robert A Hegele
Vincent Woo
Phil McFarlane
Michel Vallée
Jonathan Howlett
Simon L Bacon
Patrice Lindsay
Richard E Gilbert
Richard Z Lewanczuk
Sheldon Tobe
Author Affiliation
Division of General Internal Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. nakhan@shaw.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2009 May;25(5):287-98
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure Determination - standards
Canada
Case Management - standards
Combined Modality Therapy
Diet, Sodium-Restricted
Female
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - therapy
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Education as Topic
Prognosis
Program Evaluation
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To update the evidence-based recommendations for the prevention and management of hypertension in adults for 2009.
For lifestyle and pharmacological interventions, evidence from randomized controlled trials and systematic reviews of trials was preferentially reviewed. Changes in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality were the primary outcomes of interest. However, for lifestyle interventions, blood pressure lowering was accepted as a primary outcome given the lack of long-term morbidity and mortality data in this field. Progression of kidney dysfunction was also accepted as a clinically relevant primary outcome among patients with chronic kidney disease.
A Cochrane collaboration librarian conducted an independent MEDLINE search from 2007 to August 2008 to update the 2008 recommendations. To identify additional published studies, reference lists were reviewed and experts were contacted. All relevant articles were reviewed and appraised independently by both content and methodological experts using prespecified levels of evidence.
For lifestyle modifications to prevent and treat hypertension, restrict dietary sodium to less than 2300 mg (100 mmol)/day (and 1500 mg to 2300 mg [65 mmol to 100 mmol]/day in hypertensive patients); perform 30 min to 60 min of aerobic exercise four to seven days per week; maintain a healthy body weight (body mass index 18.5 kg/m(2) to 24.9 kg/m(2)) and waist circumference (smaller than 102 cm for men and smaller than 88 cm for women); limit alcohol consumption to no more than 14 units per week in men or nine units per week in women; follow a diet that is reduced in saturated fat and cholesterol, and that emphasizes fruits, vegetables and low-fat dairy products, dietary and soluble fibre, whole grains and protein from plant sources; and consider stress management in selected individuals with hypertension. For the pharmacological management of hypertension, treatment thresholds and targets should be predicated on by the patient's global atherosclerotic risk, target organ damage and comorbid conditions. Blood pressure should be decreased to lower than 140/90 mmHg in all patients, and to lower than 130/80 mmHg in those with diabetes mellitus or chronic kidney disease. Most patients will require more than one agent to achieve these target blood pressures. Antihypertensive therapy should be considered in all adult patients regardless of age (caution should be exercised in elderly patients who are frail). For adults without compelling indications for other agents, initial therapy should include thiazide diuretics. Other agents appropriate for first-line therapy for diastolic and/or systolic hypertension include angiotensin- converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors (in patients who are not black), long-acting calcium channel blockers (CCBs), angiotensin receptor antagonists (ARBs) or beta-blockers (in those younger than 60 years of age). A combination of two first-line agents may also be considered as the initial treatment of hypertension if the systolic blood pressure is 20 mmHg above the target or if the diastolic blood pressure is 10 mmHg above the target. The combination of ACE inhibitors and ARBs should not be used. Other agents appropriate for first-line therapy for isolated systolic hypertension include long- acting dihydropyridine CCBs or ARBs. In patients with angina, recent myocardial infarction or heart failure, beta-blockers and ACE inhibitors are recommended as first-line therapy; in patients with cerebrovascular disease, an ACE inhibitor/diuretic combination is preferred; in patients with proteinuric nondiabetic chronic kidney disease, ACE inhibitors or ARBs (if intolerant to ACE inhibitors) are recommended; and in patients with diabetes mellitus, ACE inhibitors or ARBs (or, in patients without albuminuria, thiazides or dihydropyridine CCBs) are appropriate first-line therapies. All hypertensive patients with dyslipidemia should be treated using the thresholds, targets and agents outlined in the Canadian Cardiovascular Society position statement (recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of dyslipidemia and prevention of cardiovascular disease). Selected high-risk patients with hypertension who do not achieve thresholds for statin therapy according to the position paper should nonetheless receive statin therapy. Once blood pressure is controlled, acetylsalicylic acid therapy should be considered.
All recommendations were graded according to strength of the evidence and voted on by the 57 members of the Canadian Hypertension Education Program Evidence-Based Recommendations Task Force. All recommendations reported here achieved at least 95% consensus. These guidelines will continue to be updated annually.
Notes
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PubMed ID
19417859 View in PubMed
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2009 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations: the scientific summary--an annual update.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151166
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2009 May;25(5):271-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
Norman R C Campbell
Nadia A Khan
Michael D Hill
Guy Tremblay
Marcel Lebel
Janusz Kaczorowski
Finlay A McAlister
Richard Z Lewanczuk
Sheldon Tobe
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada. ncampbel@ucalgary.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2009 May;25(5):271-7
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Attitude to Health
Blood Pressure Determination
Canada
Combined Modality Therapy
Diet, Sodium-Restricted
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - therapy
Life Style
Male
Patient Education as Topic
Program Evaluation
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
The present report highlights the key messages of the 2009 Canadian Hypertension Education Program (CHEP) recommendations for the management of hypertension and the supporting clinical evidence. In 2009, the CHEP emphasizes the need to improve the control of hypertension in people with diabetes. Intensive reduction in blood pressure (to less than 130/80 mmHg) in people with diabetes leads to significant reductions in mortality rates, disability rates and overall health care system costs, and may lead to improved quality of life. The CHEP recommendations continue to emphasize the important role of patient self-efficacy by promoting lifestyle changes to prevent and control hypertension, and encouraging home measurement of blood pressure. Unfortunately, most Canadians make only minor changes in lifestyle after a diagnosis of hypertension. Routine blood pressure measurement at all appropriate visits, and screening for and management of all cardiovascular risks are key to blood pressure management. Many young hypertensive Canadians with multiple cardiovascular risks are not treated with antihypertensive drugs. This is despite the evidence that individuals with multiple cardiovascular risks and hypertension should be strongly considered for antihypertensive drug therapy regardless of age. In 2009, the CHEP specifically recommends not to combine an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor with an angiotensin receptor blocker in people with uncomplicated hypertension, diabetes (without micro- or macroalbuminuria), chronic kidney disease (without nephropathy [micro- or overt proteinuria]) or ischemic heart disease (without heart failure).
Notes
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PubMed ID
19417857 View in PubMed
Less detail

Active ambulatory care management supported by short message services and mobile phone technology in patients with arterial hypertension.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120508
Source
J Am Soc Hypertens. 2012 Sep-Oct;6(5):346-55
Publication Type
Article
Author
Anton R Kiselev
Vladimir I Gridnev
Vladimir A Shvartz
Olga M Posnenkova
Pavel Ya Dovgalevsky
Author Affiliation
Centre of New Cardiological Informational Technologies, Saratov Research Institute of Cardiology, Saratov, Russia. antonkis@list.ru
Source
J Am Soc Hypertens. 2012 Sep-Oct;6(5):346-55
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Ambulatory Care - methods - standards
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory - methods - standards
Cellular Phone
Comparative Effectiveness Research
Disease Management
Female
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - therapy
Male
Medication Therapy Management
Middle Aged
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Patient Care Management - organization & administration
Quality Improvement
Russia
Text Messaging
Abstract
The use of short message services and mobile phone technology for ambulatory care management is the most accessible and most inexpensive way to transition from traditional ambulatory care management to active ambulatory care management in patients with arterial hypertension (AH). The aim of this study was to compare the clinical efficacy of active ambulatory care management supported by short message services and mobile phone technology with traditional ambulatory care management in AH patients. The study included 97 hypertensive patients under active ambulatory care management and 102 patients under traditional ambulatory care management. Blood pressure levels, body mass, and smoking history of patients were analyzed in the study. The duration of study was 1 year. In the active ambulatory care management group, 36% of patients were withdrawn from the study within a year. At the end of the year, 77% of patients from the active care management group had achieved the goal blood pressure level. That was more than 5 times higher than that in the traditional ambulatory care management group (P
PubMed ID
22995803 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A national medical care program for hypertension].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature245495
Source
Srp Arh Celok Lek. 1980 Sep;108(9):923-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1980

[A Swedish program for management of hypertension is to be tested for 7 years. Quality of life and temporary therapy is raised].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature246886
Source
Nord Med. 1979 Sep;94(8-9):213
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1979

Evaluation of the implementation of an integrated primary care network for prevention and management of cardiometabolic risk in Montréal.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129748
Source
BMC Fam Pract. 2011;12:126
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Sylvie Provost
Raynald Pineault
Pierre Tousignant
Marjolaine Hamel
Roxane Borgès Da Silva
Author Affiliation
Direction de santé publique de l'Agence de la santé et des services sociaux de Montréal, Canada. sprovost@santepub-mtl.qc.ca
Source
BMC Fam Pract. 2011;12:126
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiovascular Diseases - prevention & control - therapy
Chronic Disease - prevention & control
Community Networks - organization & administration
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated - organization & administration - standards
Diabetes Mellitus - diagnosis - therapy
Disease Management
Health Plan Implementation
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - therapy
Organizational Objectives
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology
Primary Health Care - utilization
Primary prevention - methods
Process Assessment (Health Care)
Program Evaluation
Qualitative Research
Quality Assurance, Health Care - methods
Quebec
Questionnaires
Research Design
Abstract
The goal of this project is to evaluate the implementation of an integrated and interdisciplinary program for prevention and management of cardiometabolic risk (PCMR). The intervention is based on the Chronic Care Model. The study will evaluate the implementation of the PCMR in 6 of the 12 health and social services centres (CSSS) in Montréal, and the effects of the PCMR on patients and the practice of their primary care physicians up to 40 months following implementation, as well as the sustainability of the program. Objectives are: 1-to evaluate the effects of the PCMR and their persistence on patients registered in the program and the practice of their primary care physicians, by implementation site and degree of exposure to the program; 2-to assess the degree of implementation of PCMR in each CSSS territory and identify related contextual factors; 3-to establish the relationships between the effects observed, the degree of PCMR implementation and the related contextual factors; 4-to assess the impact of the PCMR on strengthening local services networks.
The evaluation will use a mixed design that includes two complementary research strategies. The first strategy is similar to a quasi-experimental "before-after" design, based on a quantitative approach; it will look at the program's effects and their variations among the six territories. The effects analysis will use data from a clinical database and from questionnaires completed by participating patients and physicians. Over 3000 patients will be recruited. The second strategy corresponds to a multiple case study approach, where each of the six CSSS constitutes a case. With this strategy, qualitative methods will set out the context of implementation using data from semi-structured interviews with program managers. The quantitative data will be analyzed using linear or multilevel models complemented with an interpretive approach to qualitative data analysis.
Our study will identify contextual factors associated with the effectiveness, successful implementation and sustainability of such a program. The contextual information will enable us to extrapolate our results to other contexts with similar conditions.
ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01326130.
Notes
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PubMed ID
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