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The 2008 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations for the management of hypertension: Part 1 - blood pressure measurement, diagnosis and assessment of risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156767
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2008 Jun;24(6):455-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Raj S Padwal
Brenda R Hemmelgarn
Nadia A Khan
Steven Grover
Finlay A McAlister
Donald W McKay
Thomas Wilson
Brian Penner
Ellen Burgess
Peter Bolli
Michael D Hill
Jeff Mahon
Martin G Myers
Carl Abbott
Ernesto L Schiffrin
George Honos
Karen Mann
Guy Tremblay
Alain Milot
Lyne Cloutier
Arun Chockalingam
Simon W Rabkin
Martin Dawes Dawes
Rhian M Touyz
Chaim Bell
Kevin D Burns
Marcel Ruzicka
Norman R C Campbell
Marcel Lebel
Sheldon W Tobe
Author Affiliation
Division of General Internal Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada. rpadwal@ualberta.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2008 Jun;24(6):455-63
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure - physiology
Blood Pressure Determination - standards
Canada
Clinical Competence
Diagnosis, Differential
Education, Medical, Continuing - standards
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - drug therapy - physiopathology
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Program Evaluation - trends
Risk Assessment - methods
Abstract
To provide updated, evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis and assessment of adults with hypertension.
The diagnosis of hypertension is dependent on appropriate blood pressure measurement, the timely assessment of serially elevated readings, degree of blood pressure elevation, method of measurement (office, ambulatory, home) and associated comorbidities. The presence of cardiovascular risk factors and target organ damage should be ascertained to assess global cardiovascular risk and determine the urgency, intensity and type of treatment required.
MEDLINE searches were conducted from November 2006 to October 2007 with the aid of a medical librarian. Reference lists were scanned, experts were contacted, and the personal files of authors and subgroup members were used to identify additional studies. Content and methodological experts assessed studies using prespecified, standardized evidence-based algorithms. Recommendations were based on evidence from peer-reviewed, full-text articles only.
Recommendations for blood pressure measurement, criteria for hypertension diagnosis and follow-up, assessment of global cardiovascular risk, diagnostic testing, diagnosis of renovascular and endocrine causes of hypertension, home and ambulatory monitoring, and the use of echocardiography in hypertensive individuals are outlined. Key messages in 2008 include continued emphasis on the expedited, accurate diagnosis of hypertension, the importance of global risk assessment and the need for ongoing monitoring of hypertensive patients to identify incident type 2 diabetes.
All recommendations were graded according to strength of the evidence and voted on by the 57 members of the Canadian Hypertension Education Program Evidence-Based Recommendations Task Force. All recommendations reported here received at least 70% consensus. These guidelines will continue to be updated annually.
Notes
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PubMed ID
18548142 View in PubMed
Less detail

Central blood pressure as an index of antihypertensive control: determinants and potential value.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104464
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2014 May;30(5 Suppl):S23-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2014
Author
Luc Trudeau
Author Affiliation
Cardiovascular Prevention Centre, Department of Internal Medicine, Jewish General Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, Québec, Canada. Electronic address: Luc.trudeau@mcgill.ca.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2014 May;30(5 Suppl):S23-8
Date
May-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - administration & dosage
Antihypertensive Agents - administration & dosage
Blood Pressure - drug effects - physiology
Blood Pressure Determination
Canada
Cardiovascular Diseases - prevention & control
Carotid Arteries - physiology
Female
Hemodynamics - drug effects - physiology
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - drug therapy - physiopathology
Male
Pulsatile Flow - drug effects - physiology
Pulse
Radial Artery - physiology
Reproducibility of Results
Risk assessment
Treatment Outcome
Vascular Resistance - drug effects
Vascular Stiffness - drug effects - physiology
Abstract
The measurement of central blood pressure has generated interest as a tool in predicting cardiovascular events. The purpose of this article is to review the meaning and measurement of the central blood pressure and consider its potential value as an index of the antihypertensive response. Indirect estimation of central aortic pressures is obtained by the study of the radial pulse wave compared with a central pulse wave contour measured at the carotid or femoral artery level. The sum of the forward pressure wave created by ventricular contraction and of the reflected pressure wave from the peripheral arterial system produce the peak systolic blood pressure in the aorta. Measurement of the peripheral reflected-wave contribution to aortic blood pressure can be quantified as the augmentation index. Also, the increase in the rapidity of this travelling wave can be measured as the pulse wave velocity. These 2 parameters are considered to be valid indices of the peripheral arterial stiffness. Along with the calculation of systolic and diastolic aortic pressures, these measurements can give a better understanding of the actual central blood pressure to which core organs like heart, brain, and kidneys are submitted. There is tantalizing evidence for the potential value of central blood pressure as a useful index of antihypertensive action, but until clear evidence is obtained, its use should continue to be considered exploratory.
PubMed ID
24750979 View in PubMed
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Combination therapy with nifedipine GITS 60?mg: subanalysis of a prospective, 12-week observational study (AdADOSE).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275953
Source
Clin Exp Hypertens. 2016;38(1):71-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Ahmed K Motaweih
Elena Usova
Wajid Hussain
Ziad Dello
Thomas Petri
Source
Clin Exp Hypertens. 2016;38(1):71-80
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antihypertensive Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Blood Pressure Determination
Delayed-Action Preparations - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Drug Monitoring
Drug Therapy, Combination - methods
Female
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - drug therapy - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Middle East
Nifedipine - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Prospective Studies
Russia
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
AdADOSE was a 12-week, international, observational study conducted in the Middle East and Russia where patients received nifedipine gastrointestinal therapeutic system (GITS) at a daily dose of 30, 60, or 90?mg as part of an antihypertensive combination therapy. This subgroup analysis of the AdADOSE study assesses the efficacy and tolerability of nifedipine GITS combination therapy when used specifically at the 60-mg strength.
Patients with hypertension who received a daily nifedipine GITS dose of 60?mg, either at constant dose (n?=?686) or up-titrated from 30?mg (n?=?392), were analyzed. Target blood pressure (BP) was
Notes
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Cites: Clin Drug Investig. 2011;31(9):631-4221591818
Cites: Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2011 Dec;94(3):311-2122079683
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2013 Jul;34(28):2159-21923771844
Cites: J Hypertens. 2014 Dec;32(12):2488-98; discussion 249825144296
Cites: BMC Cardiovasc Disord. 2015;15:3525956918
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Cites: J Hypertens. 2005 Feb;23(2):445-5315662234
Cites: Hypertens Res. 2006 Oct;29(10):789-9617283866
Cites: J Hypertens. 2007 Jun;25(6):1105-8717563527
Cites: Blood Press Suppl. 2007 Mar;1:10-717566314
Cites: Blood Press Suppl. 2007 Mar;1:18-2317566315
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Cites: Am J Cardiol. 2000 Dec 1;86(11):1182-711090788
Cites: Prog Cardiovasc Nurs. 2002 Spring;17(2):81-811986541
Cites: Lancet. 2004 Sep 4-10;364(9437):849-5715351192
Cites: Int J Clin Pract. 2008 May;62(5):781-9018355239
PubMed ID
26331311 View in PubMed
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Decrease of risk of developing symptoms of OAB in elderly men and women treated with loop diuretic for hypertensive disease using solifenacin.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267405
Source
Curr Aging Sci. 2014;7(3):229-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Kirill V Kosilov
Sergay A Loparev
Marina A Ivanovskaya
Liliya V Kosilova
Source
Curr Aging Sci. 2014;7(3):229-34
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antihypertensive Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Double-Blind Method
Female
Furosemide - therapeutic use
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - drug therapy - physiopathology
Inpatients
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Prospective Studies
Quinuclidines - therapeutic use
Risk factors
Russia
Sodium Potassium Chloride Symporter Inhibitors - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Tetrahydroisoquinolines - therapeutic use
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Urinary Bladder - drug effects - physiopathology
Urinary Bladder, Overactive - chemically induced - diagnosis - physiopathology - prevention & control
Urodynamics - drug effects
Abstract
Randomized double blind longitudinal study was performed from December 1, 2012 to June 15, 2013 in urological ward of gerontological hospital (Vladivostok city, Russian Federation). 378 men and women over 65 (average age: 69.8 (7.2)), who suffered from stage 1 (initial) hypertension, had participated in this study. During the treatment all patients, except for those who were assigned to the control group, received Loop Diuretic Furosemide dosed at 20-30 mg per day and Solifenacin dosed at 5 mg per day (First comparison group) and 10 mg per day (Second comparison group). Functional performance of lower urinary tract (LUT) at enrollment and at the end of the treatment was evaluated using ICIQ-SF questionnaires. During the whole period of treatment patients were keeping bladder diaries where records on frequency and volume of daily urinations, episodes of urgency (EU), episodes of incontinence (EI) and other symptoms were kept.
Comparison of data obtained from control group (7.2%), group of the patients treated with Furosemide and standard- dosed (11.1%) and low-dosed (16.2%) Solifenacin allows to draw conclusion on the absence of significant differences in number of patients with symptoms of OAB between these groups (p = 0.05). At the same time percentage of patients with symptoms of OAB in the group treated only with Furosemide was significantly different from three other groups (p = 0.05) and reached 46.1%.
Risk of developing symptoms of OAB in elderly patients, whose hypertensive disease has been treated with loop diuretic for a long period of time, decreases significantly, provided antimuscarinic drug Solifencin is administered at the same time. Administration of low dosed Solifenacin is sufficient for significant decrease in risk of developing symptoms of overactive bladder.
PubMed ID
25495568 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effectiveness of Fixed-Dose Perindopril/Amlodipine on Clinic, Ambulatory and Self-Monitored Blood Pressure and Blood Pressure Variability: An Open-Label, Non Comparative Study in the General Practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276182
Source
High Blood Press Cardiovasc Prev. 2015 Dec;22(4):417-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
Yuri A Karpov
Vladimir M Gorbunov
Alexander D Deev
Source
High Blood Press Cardiovasc Prev. 2015 Dec;22(4):417-25
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Amlodipine - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Antihypertensive Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory
Calcium Channel Blockers - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Drug Combinations
Female
General practice
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - drug therapy - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Observer Variation
Office Visits
Perindopril - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Predictive value of tests
Reproducibility of Results
Russia
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Fixed-dose combinations (FDCs) of antihypertensive agents improve therapeutic efficacy, according to current guidelines and large clinical studies.
This Russian study examined the effect on blood pressure (BP) of substituting current ineffective antihypertensive treatment with FDC perindopril/amlodipine in patients with uncontrolled hypertension.
BP was measured in the doctor's office at each visit, daily at home, and by ambulatory monitoring (ABPM) at inclusion and end-of-study.
Ninety patients (52.7 ± 12.2 years old; mean baseline BP 161.4/94.9 mmHg) at high or very high cardiovascular risk were included. FDC perindopril/amlodipine (5/5, 10/5 or 10/10 mg) exerted a rapid (2 weeks) and significant (p
Notes
Comment In: High Blood Press Cardiovasc Prev. 2015 Dec;22(4):427-826359089
PubMed ID
26351011 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Efficacy and safety of the first made in Russia aß long-acting adrenoblocker proxodolol in patients with arterial hypertension of the second degree].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133708
Source
Ter Arkh. 2011;83(4):52-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
S A Beliaeva
Source
Ter Arkh. 2011;83(4):52-5
Date
2011
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Oral
Adrenergic alpha-Antagonists - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Delayed-Action Preparations
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - drug therapy - physiopathology
Oxadiazoles - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Russia
Severity of Illness Index
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To study efficacy and safety of a new dose and dosage form of proxodolol--a beta-adrenoblocker with alpha1-adrenoblocking activity--in patients with moderate arterial hypertension (AH).
A total of 60 patients with verified diagnosis of essential AH of the second degree were randomized into two groups: group 1 (n=40) received proxodolol, group 2 (n=20) was given carvedilol. The trial lasted for 89 days.
The trial demonstrates that proxodolol is highly effective and safe in the treatment of AH.
Proxodolol is effective and safe in hypertension, in a dose 120 mg its activity is the same as carvedilol in a dose 25 mg.
PubMed ID
21675275 View in PubMed
Less detail

Lack of impact of a comprehensive intervention on hypertension in the primary care setting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257148
Source
Am J Hypertens. 2014 Mar;27(3):489-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2014
Author
Teemu J Niiranen
Kimmo Leino
Pauli Puukka
Ilkka Kantola
Hannu Karanko
Antti M Jula
Author Affiliation
Population Studies Unit, Department of Chronic Disease Prevention, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Turku, Finland.
Source
Am J Hypertens. 2014 Mar;27(3):489-96
Date
Mar-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory
Counseling
Female
Finland
Group Processes
Health Behavior
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - drug therapy - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Education as Topic
Predictive value of tests
Primary Health Care
Risk Reduction Behavior
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The implementation of lifestyle modifications, home blood pressure (BP) measurement, and optimization of antihypertensive drug therapy have been shown to improve BP control in tightly controlled research settings. Our objective was to determine the effect of these interventions in a primary care setting, with the family practitioners and nurses serving as the interventionists.
Two hundred twenty hypertensive patients were recruited from 2 health centers that operated in the same building and covered similar populations, with the health centers randomized to function as intervention or control sites. Participants in the intervention group received repeated individual and group counseling from the centrally trained staff of the health center on healthy lifestyles. In addition, their antihypertensive drug therapy was guided by home BP measurements performed at 3-month intervals instead of by conventional office measurements.
After 12 months of follow-up, the between-group differences in the changes of lifestyle variables (body mass index, physical activity, dietary recalls, and urinary sodium/potassium) were nonsignificant. Antihypertensive treatment intensity increased in both groups, but the between-group difference was nonsignificant (P = 0.63). Office systolic/diastolic BP decreased significantly in the intervention (8/6 mm Hg; P
Notes
Comment In: Am J Hypertens. 2014 Mar;27(3):291-324363277
PubMed ID
24186848 View in PubMed
Less detail

Reporting of the estimated glomerular filtration rate was associated with increased use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin-II receptor blockers in CKD.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125942
Source
Kidney Int. 2012 Jun;81(12):1248-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Arsh K Jain
Meaghan S Cuerden
Ian McLeod
Brenda Hemmelgarn
Ayub Akbari
Marcello Tonelli
Rob R Quinn
Matt J Oliver
Amit X Garg
Author Affiliation
London Kidney Chemical Research Unit, Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, London Health Science Center, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada. arsh.jain@lhsc.on.ca
Source
Kidney Int. 2012 Jun;81(12):1248-53
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockers - therapeutic use
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Chronic Disease
Drug Prescriptions
Drug Utilization
Drug Utilization Review
Female
Glomerular Filtration Rate - drug effects
Guideline Adherence
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - drug therapy - physiopathology
Kidney - drug effects - physiopathology
Kidney Diseases - diagnosis - drug therapy - physiopathology
Kidney Function Tests
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Physician's Practice Patterns
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Predictive value of tests
Renin-Angiotensin System - drug effects
Severity of Illness Index
Time Factors
Abstract
Many guidelines suggest that angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin-II receptor antagonists (collectively referred to as renin, angiotensin, aldosterone system blockers (RAAS blockers)) are the preferred treatment for hypertension in most patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Improving the recognition of CKD with the introduction of eGFR reporting was intended to have more patients recognized with and treated for this disease. To quantify this, we examined trends in RAAS-blocker use over an 88-month period before and after routine eGFR reporting in southwestern Ontario, Canada. An intervention analysis with seasonal time-series modeling on linked health administrative data for 45,361 ambulatory residents with CKD (eGFR stages 3-5) older than 65 years was performed with a primary outcome of RAAS-blocker usage. The reporting of eGFR was associated with a significant increase in the use of RAAS blockers, as the prescription rate was 571 per 1000 patients with CKD prior to reporting but improved to 607 per 1000 after reporting. There was a significant increase in RAAS-blocker use attributable to eGFR reporting of 19 per 1000 CKD patients. Since about 8% of the adult population has CKD, this equates to about 15,200 new patients receiving RAAS-blocker treatment by 1 year after the introduction of eGFR reporting in community laboratories. Thus, eGFR reporting contributes to improved, guideline-appropriate care of older patients with CKD.
PubMed ID
22437415 View in PubMed
Less detail

Tele-monitoring of home blood pressure in treated hypertensive patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68875
Source
Blood Press. 2003;12(1):56-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Dorthe S Møller
Anette Dideriksen
Søren Sørensen
Lars D Madsen
Erling B Pedersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Holstebro Hospital and Aarhus University, Holstebro, Denmark. adsj@ringamt.dk
Source
Blood Press. 2003;12(1):56-62
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure - drug effects - physiology
Blood Pressure Determination - methods
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory - instrumentation - methods
Comparative Study
Denmark
Diastole - physiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - drug therapy - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Random Allocation
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Systole - physiology
Telemedicine - methods
Time Factors
Abstract
AIM: To compare the accuracy of clinic blood pressure (CBP) and telemedical home blood pressure (HBP) measurement in the assessment of antihypertensive effect. METHODS: 362 patients on antihypertensive medication performed HBP measurement (5 days, duplicate measurements, four times daily) and ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) monitoring in random order. Main outcome measure was the agreement of CBP and HBP with daytime ABP. RESULTS: CBP was much higher than ABP and average HBP (p
PubMed ID
12699137 View in PubMed
Less detail

[The work experience of a polyclinic functional diagnosis office in improving the care for patients with arterial hypertension and ischemic heart disease].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222450
Source
Ter Arkh. 1993;65(1):49-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
S K Sivkova
P V Larionov
Source
Ter Arkh. 1993;65(1):49-52
Date
1993
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Ambulatory Care Facilities - standards
Chronic Disease
Diagnosis, Differential
Glomerulonephritis - diagnosis - drug therapy - physiopathology
Hemodynamics
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - drug therapy - physiopathology
Middle Aged
Moscow
Myocardial Ischemia - diagnosis - drug therapy - physiopathology
Pyelonephritis - diagnosis - drug therapy - physiopathology
Quality of Health Care - standards
Abstract
151 patients with arterial hypertension and 54 patients with ischemic heart disease have been examined in outpatient room of cardiological functional diagnosis. The patients were referred to this service by a district therapeutist because of difficulties in drug selection and judging on efficacy of on-going outpatient treatment. Introduction of bicycle ergometry and tetrapolar chest rheography into outpatient practice helped orient the treatment of hypertensive and coronary patients on common hemodynamic types. Such an approach promoted more rapid clinical response, reduced the number of complications and temporary disability duration.
PubMed ID
8036573 View in PubMed
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13 records – page 1 of 2.