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The 24-hour urine collection: gold standard or historical practice?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155561
Source
Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2008 Dec;199(6):625.e1-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Anne-Marie Côté
Tabassum Firoz
André Mattman
Elaine M Lam
Peter von Dadelszen
Laura A Magee
Author Affiliation
Department of Nephrology, University of Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, PQ, Canada.
Source
Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2008 Dec;199(6):625.e1-6
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Biological Markers - urine
British Columbia
Cohort Studies
Creatinine - urine
Female
Gynecology - standards
Hospitals, University
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - urine
Pre-Eclampsia - diagnosis - urine
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Cardiovascular - diagnosis - urine
Pregnancy outcome
Prenatal Care - standards
Reference Standards
Retrospective Studies
Sensitivity and specificity
Time Factors
Urinalysis - standards
Young Adult
Abstract
The objective of the study was to determine completeness of 24-hour urine collection in pregnancy.
This was a retrospective laboratory/chart review of 24-hour urine collections at British Columbia Women's Hospital. Completeness was assessed by 24-hour urinary creatinine excretion (UcreatV): expected according to maternal weight for single collections and between-measurement difference for serial collections.
For 198 randomly selected pregnant women with a hypertensive disorder (63% preeclampsia), 24-hour urine collections were frequently inaccurate (13-54%) on the basis of UcreatV of 97-220 micromol/kg per day (11.0-25.0 mg/kg per day) or 133-177 micromol/kg per day (15.1-20.1 mg/kg per day) of prepregnancy weight (respectively). Lean body weight resulted in more inaccurate collections (24-68%). The current weight was frequently unavailable (28%) and thus not used. For 161 women (81% proteinuric) with serial 24-hour urine levels, a median [interquartile range] of 11 [5-31] days apart, between-measurement difference in UcreatV was 14.4% [6.0-24.9]; 40 women (24.8%) had values 25% or greater, exceeding analytic and biologic variation.
Twenty-four hour urine collection is frequently inaccurate and not a precise measure of proteinuria or creatinine clearance.
PubMed ID
18718568 View in PubMed
Less detail

[24-hr monitoring arterial pressure in outpatients with cardiovascular risk factors in the Far North].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261133
Source
Klin Med (Mosk). 2013;91(10):38-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
V B Simonenko
K B Solov'eva
I V Dolbin
Source
Klin Med (Mosk). 2013;91(10):38-43
Date
2013
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Arterial Pressure - physiology
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Outpatients - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Russia
Abstract
To study peculiar features of daily AP rhythm and profile in men with cardiovascular risk factors residing in the Far North.
The study included 115 servicemen divided into 3 groups (hypertensive disease (HD), hypertonic type neurocirculatory asthenia (NCA) and risk factor of cardiovascular diseases other than AH). HD was diagnosed based on multiple AP measurements and 24-hr monitoring.
HD was associated with elevated mean AP, load indices and AP variability All patients had pathological type of morning dynamics. Normal daily rhythm of systolic AP (SAP) was documented in 66.1% of the patients with HD and in 68% with cardiovascular risk factors without AH. Normal daily rhythm ofdiastolic AP (DAP) was recorded in 63.5% of the patients with HD and in 72% with cardiovascular risk factors without AH. In group 2, normal daily rhythms of SAP and DAP were found in 44 and 56% of the cases respectively.
Men residing in the Far North under conditions of anomalous photoperiod need medicamentous correction of AP regardless of AH type. Ambulatory BP monitoring should be preferred for the assessment of the efficacy of antihypertensive therapy.
PubMed ID
25696949 View in PubMed
Less detail

1999 Canadian recommendations for the management of hypertension. Task Force for the Development of the 1999 Canadian Recommendations for the Management of Hypertension.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199846
Source
CMAJ. 1999;161 Suppl 12:S1-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
R D Feldman
N. Campbell
P. Larochelle
P. Bolli
E D Burgess
S G Carruthers
J S Floras
R B Haynes
G. Honos
F H Leenen
L A Leiter
A G Logan
M G Myers
J D Spence
K B Zarnke
Author Affiliation
Robarts Research Institute, University of Western Ontario, London. feldmanr@lhsc.on.ca
Source
CMAJ. 1999;161 Suppl 12:S1-17
Date
1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Canada
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - drug therapy
Middle Aged
Abstract
To provide updated, evidence-based recommendations for health care professionals on the management of hypertension in adults.
For patients with hypertension, there are both lifestyle options and pharmacological therapy options that may control blood pressure. For those patients who are using pharmacological therapy, a range of antihypertensive drugs is available. The choice of a specific antihypertensive drug is dependent upon the severity of the hypertension and the presence of other cardiovascular risk factors and concurrent diseases.
The health outcomes considered were changes in blood pressure and in morbidity and mortality rates. Because of insufficient evidence, no economic outcomes were considered.
MEDLINE searches were conducted from the period of the last revision of the Canadian Recommendations for the Management of Hypertension (January 1993 to May 1998). Reference lists were scanned, experts were polled and the personal files of the authors were used to identify other studies. All relevant articles were reviewed, classified according to study design and graded according to levels of evidence.
A high value was placed on the avoidance of cardiovascular morbidity and premature death caused by untreated hypertension.
Harms and costs: The diagnosis and treatment of hypertension with pharmacological therapy will reduce the blood pressure of patients with sustained hypertension. In certain settings, and for specific drugs, blood pressure lowering has been associated with reduced cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.
This document contains detailed recommendations pertaining to all aspects of the diagnosis and pharmacological therapy of hypertensive patients. With respect to diagnosis, the recommendations endorse the greater use of non-office-based measures of blood pressure control (i.e., using home blood pressure and automatic ambulatory blood pressure monitoring equipment) and greater emphasis on the identification of other cardiovascular risk factors, both in the assessment of prognosis in hypertension and in the choice of therapy. On the treatment side, lower targets for blood pressure control are advocated for some subgroups of hypertensive patients, in particular, those with diabetes and renal disease. Implicit in the recommendations for therapy is the principle that for the vast majority of hypertensive patients treated pharmacologically, practitioners should not follow a stepped-care approach. Instead, therapy should be individualized, based on consideration of concurrent diseases, both cardiovascular and noncardiovascular.
All recommendations were graded according to the strength of the evidence and the consensus of all relevant stakeholders.
The Canadian Hypertension Society and the Canadian Coalition for High Blood Pressure Prevention and Control.
Notes
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Comment In: CMAJ. 2000 May 30;162(11):1554-5; author reply 155610862226
PubMed ID
10624417 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 2001 Canadian hypertension recommendations: take-home messages.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188323
Source
CMAJ. 2002 Sep 17;167(6):661-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-17-2002
Author
Norman R C Campbell
Denis Drouin
Ross D Feldman
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Alta. ncampbel@ucalgary.ca
Source
CMAJ. 2002 Sep 17;167(6):661-8
Date
Sep-17-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Blood Chemical Analysis
Blood Pressure Determination
Canada
Female
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - drug therapy - therapy
Life Style
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Risk assessment
Notes
Cites: Hypertension. 2000 May;35(5):1025-3010818057
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2001 Jan 4;344(1):3-1011136953
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Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1983 Apr;117(4):429-426837557
Cites: J Hypertens. 1992 Aug;10(8):887-961325524
Cites: Fam Pract. 1997 Apr;14(2):130-59137951
Cites: J Hypertens. 1999 Feb;17(2):151-8310067786
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Erratum In: CMAJ 2002 Oct 29;167(9):989
PubMed ID
12358202 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 2001 Canadian recommendations for the management of hypertension: Part one--Assessment for diagnosis, cardiovascular risk, causes and lifestyle modification.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189435
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2002 Jun;18(6):604-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2002
Author
Kelly B Zarnke
Finlay A McAlister
Norman R C Campbell
Mitchell Levine
Ernesto L Schiffrin
Steven Grover
Donald W McKay
Martin G Myers
Thomas W Wilson
Simon W Rabkin
Ross D Feldman
Ellen Burgess
Peter Bolli
George Honos
Marcel Lebel
Karen Mann
Carl Abbott
Sheldon Tobe
Robert Petrella
Rhian M Touyz
Author Affiliation
London Health Sciences Centre, University Hospital Campus, London, Canada.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2002 Jun;18(6):604-24
Date
Jun-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure Determination - standards
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory - standards
Canada
Cardiovascular Diseases - diagnosis - prevention & control - therapy
Diet
Exercise
Female
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - prevention & control - therapy
Life Style
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Cardiovascular - diagnosis - prevention & control
Risk assessment
Abstract
To provide updated, evidence-based recommendations for the assessment of the diagnosis, cardiovascular risk, identifiable causes and lifestyle modifications for adults with high blood pressure.
For persons in whom a high blood pressure value is recorded, hypertension is diagnosed based on the appropriate measurement of blood pressure, the level of the blood pressure elevation and the duration of follow-up. In addition, the presence of concomitant vascular risk factors, target organ damage and established atherosclerotic diseases must be assessed to determine the urgency, intensity and type of treatment. For persons receiving a diagnosis of hypertension, defining the overall risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes requires an assessment of concomitant vascular risk factors, including laboratory testing, a search for target organ damage and an assessment for modifiable causes of hypertension. Home and ambulatory blood pressure assessment and echocardiography are options for selected patients.
The outcomes were: the identification of persons at increased risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes; the quantification of overall cardiovascular risk; and the identification of persons with potentially modifiable causes of hypertension.
Medline searches were conducted from one year before the period of the last revision of the Canadian recommendations for the management of hypertension (May 1999 to May 2001). Reference lists were scanned, experts were polled, and the personal files of the subgroup members and authors were used to identify other studies. Identified articles were reviewed and appraised, using prespecified levels of evidence, by content experts and methodological experts. In addition to an update of the previous year's review, new sections on assessing overall cardiovascular risk and endocrine causes are provided.
A high value was placed on the identification of persons at increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and of persons with identifiable causes of hypertension.
The identification of persons at higher risk of cardiovascular disease will permit counseling for lifestyle manoeuvres and introduction of antihypertensive drugs to reduce blood pressure for patients with sustained hypertension. The identification of specific causes of hypertension may permit the use of cause-specific interventions. In certain subgroups of patients, and for specific classes of drugs, blood pressure lowering has been associated with reduced cardiovascular morbidity or mortality.
The present document contains recommendations for the assessment of the diagnosis, cardiovascular risk, identifiable causes and lifestyle modifications for adults with high blood pressure. These include the accurate measurement of blood pressure, criteria for the diagnosis of hypertension and recommendations for follow-up, assessment of overall cardiovascular risk, routine and optional laboratory testing, assessment for renovascular and endocrine causes, home and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, the role of echocardiography and lifestyle modifications.
All recommendations were graded according to the strength of the evidence and voted on by the Canadian Hypertension Recommendations Working Group. Only those recommendations achieving high levels of consensus are reported. These guidelines will be updated annually.
These guidelines are endorsed by the Canadian Hypertension Society, The Canadian Coalition for High Blood Pressure Prevention and Control, The College of Family Physicians of Canada, The Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, The Adult Disease Division and Bureau of Cardio-Respiratory Diseases and Diabetes at the Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention and Control, Health Canada.
PubMed ID
12107419 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 2004 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations for the management of hypertension: Part I--Blood pressure measurement, diagnosis and assessment of risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181499
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2004 Jan;20(1):31-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2004
Author
Brenda R Hemmelgarn
Kelly B Zarnke
Norman R C Campbell
Ross D Feldman
Donald W McKay
Finlay A McAlister
Nadia Khan
Ernesto L Schiffrin
Martin G Myers
Peter Bolli
George Honos
Marcel Lebel
Mitchell Levine
Raj Padwal
Author Affiliation
Division of Nephrology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2004 Jan;20(1):31-40
Date
Jan-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure Determination - standards
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory - standards
Canada - epidemiology
Cardiovascular Diseases - prevention & control
Diet
Evidence-Based Medicine - standards
Female
Health Education - organization & administration
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Incidence
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Risk assessment
Societies, Medical
Abstract
To provide updated, evidence-based recommendations for the assessment of the diagnosis, cardiovascular risk and identifiable causes for adults with high blood pressure.
For persons in whom a high blood pressure value is recorded, the assignment of a diagnosis of hypertension is dependent on the appropriate measurement of blood pressure, the level of the blood pressure elevation and the duration of follow-up. In addition, the presence of concomitant vascular risk factors, target organ damage and established atherosclerotic diseases should be assessed to determine the urgency, intensity and type of treatment. For persons diagnosed as having hypertension, defining overall risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes requires an assessment of concomitant vascular risk factors, including laboratory testing, a search for target organ damage and an assessment for modifiable causes of hypertension. Home and ambulatory blood pressure assessment and echocardiography are options for selected patients.
The identification of persons at increased risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes; the quantification of overall cardiovascular risk; and the identification of persons with potentially modifiable causes of hypertension.
Medline searches were conducted from November 2001, one year before the period of the last revision of the Canadian recommendations for the management of hypertension, to October 2003. Reference lists were scanned, experts were polled, and the personal files of subgroup members and authors were used to identify other studies. Identified articles were reviewed and appraised using prespecified levels of evidence by content experts and methodological experts.
A high value was placed on the identification of persons at increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and persons with identifiable and potentially modifiable causes of hypertension.
The identification of persons at higher risk of cardiovascular disease will permit counselling for lifestyle maneuvers and introduction of antihypertensive drugs to reduce blood pressure for patients with sustained hypertension. The identification of specific causes of hypertension may permit the use of cause-specific interventions. For certain subgroups of patients and specific classes of drugs, blood pressure lowering has been associated with reduced cardiovascular morbidity and/or mortality.
The document contains recommendations for blood pressure measurement, diagnosis of hypertension and assessment of cardiovascular risk for adults with high blood pressure. These include the accurate measurement of blood pressure, criteria for diagnosis of hypertension, and recommendations for follow-up, assessment of overall cardiovascular risk, routine and optional laboratory testing, assessment for renovascular and endocrine causes, home and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, and the role of echocardiography for those with hypertension.
All recommendations were graded according to strength of evidence and voted on by the Canadian Hypertension Education Program Evidence-Based Recommendations Task Force. Only the recommendations that achieved high levels of consensus are reported. These guidelines will be updated annually.
PubMed ID
14968141 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 2004 Canadian recommendations for the management of hypertension: Part II--Therapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181498
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2004 Jan;20(1):41-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2004
Author
Nadia A Khan
Finlay A McAlister
Norman R C Campbell
Ross D Feldman
Simon Rabkin
Jeff Mahon
Richard Lewanczuk
Kelly B Zarnke
Brenda Hemmelgarn
Marcel Lebel
Mitchell Levine
Carol Herbert
Author Affiliation
Division of General Internal Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2004 Jan;20(1):41-54
Date
Jan-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antihypertensive Agents - administration & dosage
Blood Pressure Determination - standards
Canada - epidemiology
Cardiovascular Diseases - prevention & control
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Drug Administration Schedule
Drug Therapy, Combination
Evidence-Based Medicine - standards
Female
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Risk assessment
Severity of Illness Index
Societies, Medical
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To provide updated, evidence-based recommendations for the management of hypertension in adults.
For patients who require pharmacological therapy for hypertension, a number of antihypertensive agents may be used. Randomized trials evaluating first-line therapy with diuretics, beta-blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, calcium channel blockers (CCBs), alpha-blockers, centrally acting agents or angiotensin receptor antagonists were reviewed. Also, randomized trials evaluating other agents, such as statins or acetylsalicylic acid, in patients with hypertension were reviewed. Changes in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality were the primary outcomes of interest. In addition, other relevant outcomes such as development of end-stage renal disease or changes in blood pressure were examined where appropriate.
MEDLINE searches were conducted from November 2001 to October 2003 to update the 2001 Recommendations for the management of hypertension. Reference lists were scanned, experts were contacted, and the personal files of the subgroup members and authors were used to identify additional published studies. All relevant articles were reviewed and appraised independently, using prespecified levels of evidence by content and methodology experts.
This document contains detailed recommendations and supporting evidence on treatment thresholds, target blood pressures and choice of agents for hypertensive patients with or without comorbidities. Lifestyle modifications are a key component of any antiatherosclerotic management strategy and detailed recommendations are contained in a separate document. Key recommendations for pharmacotherapy include the following: treatment thresholds and targets should take into account each individual's global atherosclerotic risk, target organ damage and comorbidities, with particular attention to systolic blood pressure; blood pressure should be lowered to 140/90 mmHg or less in all patients, and 130/80 mmHg or less in those with diabetes mellitus or renal disease (125/75 mmHg or less in those with nondiabetic renal disease and more than 1 g of proteinuria per day); most adults with hypertension require more than one agent to achieve target blood pressures; for adults without compelling indications for other agents, initial therapy should include thiazide diuretics; other agents appropriate for first-line therapy for diastolic hypertension with or without systolic hypertension include beta-blockers (in those younger than 60 years), ACE inhibitors (in non-Blacks), long-acting dihydropyridine CCBs or angiotensin receptor antagonists; other agents appropriate for first-line therapy for isolated systolic hypertension include long-acting dihydropyridine CCBs or angiotensin receptor antagonists; certain comorbidities provide compelling indications for first-line use of other agents: in patients with angina, recent myocardial infarction or heart failure, beta-blockers and ACE inhibitors are recommended as first-line therapy; in patients with diabetes mellitus, ACE inhibitors or angiotensin receptor antagonists (or thiazides in patients with diabetes mellitus without albuminuria) are appropriate first-line therapies; and in patients with mild to moderate nondiabetic renal disease, ACE inhibitors are recommended; all hypertensive patients should have their fasting lipids screened and those with dyslipidemia should be treated using the thresholds, targets and agents as per the Recommendations for the management of dyslipidemia and the prevention of cardiovascular disease; and selected patients with hypertension should also receive statin and/or acetylsalicylic acid therapy.
All recommendations were graded according to the strength of the evidence and voted on by the Canadian Hypertension Education Program Evidence-Based Recommendations Task Force. Individuals with irreconcilable competing interests (declared by all members, compiled and circulated before the meeting) relative to any specific recommendation were excluded from voting on that recommendation. Only recommendations achieving at least 70% consensus are reported here. These guidelines will continue to be updated annually.
PubMed ID
14968142 View in PubMed
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The 2005 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations for the management of hypertension: part 1- blood pressure measurement, diagnosis and assessment of risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173955
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2005 Jun;21(8):645-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Brenda R Hemmelgarn
Finlay A McAllister
Martin G Myers
Donald W McKay
Peter Bolli
Carl Abbott
Ernesto L Schiffrin
Steven Grover
George Honos
Marcel Lebel
Karen Mann
Thomas Wilson
Brian Penner
Guy Tremblay
Sheldon W Tobe
Ross D Feldman
Author Affiliation
Division of Nephrology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2005 Jun;21(8):645-56
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory
Canada
Decision Trees
Evidence-Based Medicine
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - prevention & control
Patient Education as Topic
Risk assessment
Abstract
To provide updated, evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis and assessment of adults with high blood pressure (BP).
For persons in whom a high BP value is recorded, the assignment of a diagnosis of hypertension is dependent on the appropriate measurement of BP, the level of the BP elevation and the duration of follow-up. In addition, the presence of cardiovascular risk factors and target organ damage should be assessed to determine the urgency, intensity and type of treatment. For persons diagnosed as having hypertension, estimating overall risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes requires an assessment of other vascular risk factors and hypertensive target organ damage.
MEDLINE searches were conducted from November 2003 to October 2004 to update the 2004 recommendations. Reference lists were scanned, experts were polled, and the personal files of the authors and subgroup members were used to identify other studies. Identified articles were reviewed and appraised using prespecified levels of evidence by content and methodological experts. As per previous years, only studies that had been published in the peer-reviewed literature were included; evidence from abstracts, conference presentations and unpublished personal communications was not included.
This document contains recommendations for BP measurement, diagnosis of hypertension and assessment of cardiovascular risk for adults with high BP. These include the accurate measurement of BP, criteria for diagnosis of hypertension, and recommendations for follow-up, assessment of overall cardiovascular risk, routine and optional laboratory testing, assessment for renovascular and endocrine causes, home and ambulatory BP monitoring, and the role of echocardiography for those with hypertension. Key features of the 2005 recommendations include an expedited diagnostic algorithm for hypertension and an endorsement of the use of home/self and ambulatory BP assessment as validated techniques in establishing the diagnosis of hypertension.
All recommendations were graded according to the strength of the evidence and voted on by the 43 members of the Canadian Hypertension Education Program Evidence-Based Recommendations Task Force. All recommendations reported in the present paper received at least 95% consensus. These guidelines will continue to be updated annually.
PubMed ID
16003448 View in PubMed
Less detail

2005 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations. New and important aspects of the sixth annual Canadian Hypertension Education Program's recommendations for management of hypertension.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174444
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2005 May;51:702-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2005

The 2006 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations for the management of hypertension: Part I--Blood pressure measurement, diagnosis and assessment of risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168977
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2006 May 15;22(7):573-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-15-2006
Author
B R Hemmelgarn
Finlay A McAlister
Steven Grover
Martin G Myers
Donald W McKay
Peter Bolli
Carl Abbott
Ernesto L Schiffrin
George Honos
Ellen Burgess
Karen Mann
Thomas Wilson
Brian Penner
Guy Tremblay
Alain Milot
Arun Chockalingam
Rhian M Touyz
Sheldon W Tobe
Author Affiliation
Division of Nephrology, University of Calgary, and Foothills Hospital, 1403 29th Street Northwest, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. brenda.hemmelgarn@calgaryhealthregion.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2006 May 15;22(7):573-81
Date
May-15-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advisory Committees
Blood Pressure Determination
Canada
Echocardiography
Humans
Hyperaldosteronism - diagnosis
Hypertension - diagnosis
Mass Screening
Patient Education as Topic
Pheochromocytoma - diagnosis
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Abstract
To provide updated, evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis and assessment of adults with high blood pressure.
For persons in whom a high blood pressure value is recorded, a diagnosis of hypertension is dependent on the appropriate measurement of blood pressure, the level of the blood pressure elevation, the approach used to monitor blood pressure (office, ambulatory or home/self), and the duration of follow-up. In addition, the presence of cardiovascular risk factors and target organ damage should be assessed to determine the urgency, intensity and type of treatment. For persons diagnosed as having hypertension, estimating the overall risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes requires an assessment for other vascular risk factors and hypertensive target organ damage.
MEDLINE searches were conducted from November 2004 to October 2005 to update the 2005 recommendations. Reference lists were scanned, experts were polled, and the personal files of the authors and subgroup members were used to identify other studies. Identified articles were reviewed and appraised using prespecified levels of evidence by content and methodological experts. As per previous years, the authors only included studies that had been published in the peer-reviewed literature and did not include evidence from abstracts, conference presentations or unpublished personal communications.
The present document contains recommendations for blood pressure measurement, diagnosis of hypertension, and assessment of cardiovascular risk for adults with high blood pressure. These include the accurate measurement of blood pressure, criteria for the diagnosis of hypertension and recommendations for follow-up, assessment of overall cardiovascular risk, routine and optional laboratory testing, assessment for renovascular and endocrine causes, home and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, and the role of echocardiography for those with hypertension. Key features of the 2006 recommendations include continued emphasis on an expedited diagnosis of hypertension, an in-depth review of the role of global risk assessment in hypertension therapy, and the use of home/self blood pressure monitoring for patients with masked hypertension (subjects with hypertension who have a blood pressure that is normal in clinic but elevated on home/self measurement).
All recommendations were graded according to the strength of the evidence and were voted on by the 45 members of the Canadian Hypertension Education Program Evidence-Based Recommendations Task Force. All recommendations reported herein received at least 95% consensus. These guidelines will continue to be updated annually.
Notes
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PubMed ID
16755312 View in PubMed
Less detail

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