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[Age- and sex-related prevalence of overweight, arterial hypertension, hyperglycemia and their combinations].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159566
Source
Ter Arkh. 2008;80(9):76-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
V P Veber
M S Kazymov
M N Kopina
M P Rubanova
D P Shmat'ko
Iu V Zakharova
M Iu Mishkina
Source
Ter Arkh. 2008;80(9):76-8
Date
2008
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Body mass index
Female
Humans
Hyperglycemia - complications - epidemiology
Hypertension - complications - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Overweight - complications - epidemiology
Prevalence
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Sex Distribution
Sex Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
To study sex and age characteristics of overweight, arterial hypertension (AH) and hyperglycemia prevalence as well as prevalence of their combination.
Complex examination of Veliky Novgorod and Novgorod region 4837 residents (2081 men and 2756 women, age 20-87 years) comprised anthropometric measurements with calculation of the body mass index (Ketle index), measurements of blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, cholesterol levels, oral glucose tolerance test (GTT).
Prevalence of overweight and obesity in males was 50.4%, in females - 63.1%. Stage I obesity occurs twice more frequently in women than in men, stage II and III obesity four and six times more frequently, respectively. 46.8% of adults suffer from AH, hyperglycemia was found in 6.03% cases. Overweight patients had metabolic carbohydrate disturbances three times more frequently than normal weight subjects. In women prevalence of overweight combination with AH was 1.5 times higher vs men (39.9 vs 26.3%); the prevalence of overweight combination with hyperglycemia was 1.7 times higher (5.5 vs 3.2%); prevalence of AH combination with hyperglycemia was 1.7 times higher (7.72 vs 2.71%). Hyperglycemia in obese persons occurred more frequently in women under 40 and men over 40 years of age.
High prevalence of overweight, obesity, AH, hyperglycemia and their combinations have been revealed. This prevalence closely depended on sex and age. Prevalence of obesity and hyperglycemia, combination of overweight with AH and hyperglycemia, combination of AH with hyperglycemia is significantly higher in female subpopulation and in older cohorts.
PubMed ID
19555043 View in PubMed
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[Age-related sarcopenia as the risk factor of development of myocardial dysfunction and chronic heart failure in elderly patients with arterial hypertension].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117533
Source
Adv Gerontol. 2012;25(3):456-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
N V Medvedev
N K Gorshunova
Source
Adv Gerontol. 2012;25(3):456-60
Date
2012
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Body mass index
Cardiomyopathies - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Disease Progression
Echocardiography
Female
Heart Failure - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Humans
Hypertension - complications - epidemiology - physiopathology
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Muscle Contraction - physiology
Muscle, Skeletal - pathology - physiopathology
Prognosis
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Sarcopenia - complications - epidemiology
Ventricular Function - physiology
Abstract
To estimate the expressiveness of involutive sarcopenia and its influences on the development of myocardial dysfunctions 88 patients of 60+ years with arterial hypertension (AH) II stage (middle age 66.9 +/- 0.7 years, 76 women and 12 men) and 32 persons who do not have cardiovascular diseases were surveyed. It is revealed that expressiveness of involutive sarcopenia is non-uniform at senior patients; structural and functional changes of heart in elderly patients with AH clinically shown by myocardial dysfunction, decreased tolerance to physical activity, are more pronounced in the group of patients with a low index of muscular weight. High values of the indicators of oxidative modification of lipids in the blood serum and the insufficiency of mechanisms of antioxidant protection in elderly patients with AH who have low index of muscle mass point to the negative role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of involutive sarcopenia.
PubMed ID
23289222 View in PubMed
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[Arterial hypertension (author's transl)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244535
Source
Urologe A. 1981 May;20(3):118-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1981
Author
H G Hartmann
G A Jutzler
Source
Urologe A. 1981 May;20(3):118-22
Date
May-1981
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cerebrovascular Disorders - etiology
Coronary Disease - etiology
Diet
Female
Finland
Germany, West
Humans
Hypertension - complications - epidemiology - etiology
Kidney Diseases - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - complications
Sodium Chloride - adverse effects
United States
Abstract
Arterial hypertension represents the most prevalent disease on our country. Due to cardiovascular complications, early invalidism and increased mortality are common. There is general agreement that genetic influences, overweight and increased uptake of salt are predisposing factors. In about 5--10% of all hypertensive patients an underlying cause can be incriminated. Among these cases of secondary hypertension less than 10% can be treated by surgery alone. Hypertension teaching programs in other countries using conventional treatment protocols have met with considerable success in all types including borderline-hypertension.
PubMed ID
7022995 View in PubMed
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Association between obesity and high blood pressure: reporting bias related to gender and age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204697
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 1998 Aug;22(8):771-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1998
Author
Y. Chen
D C Rennie
L A Lockinger
J A Dosman
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Community Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 1998 Aug;22(8):771-7
Date
Aug-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Bias (epidemiology)
Confidence Intervals
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Hypertension - complications - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - complications - epidemiology
Prevalence
Reproducibility of Results
Risk factors
Saskatchewan - epidemiology
Sensitivity and specificity
Sex Factors
Abstract
To examine the validity of self-reported information on obesity and high blood pressure (HBP) in relation to gender and age, and to explore the impacts of their misclassification on the association between obesity and HBP.
Community based cross-sectional study.
1791 adult subjects living in Humboldt, Saskatchewan, Canada.
Objectively measured HBP was positive if systolic blood pressure (BP) was > or = 140 mm Hg, diastolic BP was > or = 90 mm Hg or the subject was currently using antihypertensive medication. Self-reported HBP was positive if the subjects gave an affirmative response to the question: 'Has a doctor ever said you had high blood pressure?' Body mass index (BMI) was calculated as weight (kg)/height (m)2. Obesity was defined as a BMI > 27 kg/m2. Measured obesity and reported obesity were based on measured and self-reported information on height and weight, respectively.
The sensitivity of self-reported HBP was low, and was lower for men than for women, and for younger subjects than for older subjects. The specificity was similar for both genders. Obese individuals had higher sensitivity and lower specificity than non-obese individuals. The differential misclassification of self-reported HBP caused a bias away from the null when the relative risk for HBP in relation to obesity was estimated.
As a result of the gender- and age-related misclassification of self-reported HBP, the modification role of gender and age on the association between obesity and HBP could be altered. The bias caused by self-reported obesity was relatively small and was either toward or away from the null.
PubMed ID
9725637 View in PubMed
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The association between p,p'-DDE levels and left ventricular mass is mainly mediated by obesity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287183
Source
Environ Res. 2018 Jan;160:541-546
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2018
Author
M A La Merrill
P M Lind
S. Salihovic
B. van Bavel
L. Lind
Source
Environ Res. 2018 Jan;160:541-546
Date
Jan-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiposity - physiology
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Blood Glucose - analysis
Cohort Studies
Dichlorodiphenyl Dichloroethylene - toxicity
Environmental Pollutants - toxicity
Female
Heart Ventricles - physiopathology
Humans
Hypertension - complications - epidemiology
Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular - chemically induced - epidemiology
Insecticides - toxicity
Male
Obesity - chemically induced - epidemiology
Prevalence
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The pesticide metabolite p,p'-DDE has been associated with left ventricular (LV) mass and known risk factors for LV hypertrophy in humans and in experimental models. We hypothesized that the associations of p,p'-DDE with LV hypertrophy risk factors, namely elevated glucose, adiposity and hypertension, mediate the association of p,p'-DDE with LV mass.
p,p'-DDE was measured in plasma from 70-year-old subjects (n = 988) of the Prospective Study of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS). When these subjects were 70-, 75- and 80- years old, LV characteristics were measured by echocardiography, while fasting glucose, body mass index (BMI) and blood pressure were assessed with standard clinical techniques.
We found that p,p'-DDE levels were associated with increased fasting glucose, BMI, hypertension and LV mass in separate models adjusted for sex. Structural equation modeling revealed that the association between p,p'-DDE and LV mass was almost entirely mediated by BMI (70%), and also by hypertension (19%).
The obesogenic effect of p,p'-DDE is a major determinant responsible for the association of p,p'-DDE with LV mass.
PubMed ID
29106953 View in PubMed
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Association of heart diseases with COPD and restrictive lung function--results from a population survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119194
Source
Respir Med. 2013 Jan;107(1):98-106
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Berne Eriksson
Anne Lindberg
Hana Müllerova
Eva Rönmark
Bo Lundbäck
Author Affiliation
The OLIN Studies, Department of Medicine, Sunderby Central Hospital of Norrbotten, Luleå, Sweden. berne.eriksson@telia.com
Source
Respir Med. 2013 Jan;107(1):98-106
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Forced Expiratory Volume - physiology
Health Surveys
Humans
Hypertension - complications - epidemiology
Lung - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - complications - epidemiology
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - complications - epidemiology
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Social Class
Sweden - epidemiology
Vital Capacity - physiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Few studies have explored the association of COPD, based on GOLD definition, with heart diseases. The relationship between restrictive lung function impairment and heart diseases is still poorly studied on a population level.
To explore the association of COPD and restrictive lung function impairment, respectively, with heart diseases in the general population.
This is a cross-sectional study of 642 randomly selected 22- to 72-year-old subjects in northern Sweden. COPD was defined according to GOLD. Restrictive lung function was defined as pre-bronchodilator FVC
PubMed ID
23127573 View in PubMed
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Asymptomatic ST-segment depression during exercise testing and the risk of sudden cardiac death in middle-aged men: a population-based follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152979
Source
Eur Heart J. 2009 Mar;30(5):558-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Jari A Laukkanen
Timo H Mäkikallio
Rainer Rauramaa
Sudhir Kurl
Author Affiliation
Research Institute of Public Health, University of Kuopio, Kuopio, Finland. jariantero.laukkanen@uku.fi
Source
Eur Heart J. 2009 Mar;30(5):558-65
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body mass index
Death, Sudden, Cardiac - epidemiology - etiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - complications - epidemiology - physiopathology
Electrocardiography
Epidemiologic Methods
Exercise - physiology
Exercise Test - methods
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Hypertension - complications - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Abstract
Silent electrocardiographic ST change predicts future coronary events in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD), but the prognostic significance of asymptomatic ST-segment depression with respect to sudden cardiac death in subjects without apparent CHD is not well known.
We investigated the association between silent ST-segment depression during and after maximal symptom-limited exercise test and the risk of sudden cardiac death in a population-based sample of 1769 men without evident CHD. A total of 72 sudden cardiac death occurred during the median follow-up of 18 years. The risk of sudden cardiac death was increased among men with asymptomatic ST-segment depression during exercise [hazard ratio (HR) 2.1, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.2-3.9] as well as among those with asymptomatic ST-segment depression during recovery period (HR 3.2, 95% CI 1.7-6.0). Asymptomatic ST-depression during exercise testing was a stronger predictor for the risk of sudden cardiac death especially among smokers as well as in hypercholesterolaemic and hypertensive men than in men without these risk factors.
Asymptomatic ST-segment depression was a very strong predictor of sudden cardiac death in men with any conventional risk factor but no previously diagnosed CHD, emphasizing the value of exercise testing to identify asymptomatic high-risk men who could benefit from preventive measures.
Notes
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PubMed ID
19168533 View in PubMed
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Atrial fibrillation and its association with type 2 diabetes and hypertension in a Swedish community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47197
Source
Diabetes Obes Metab. 2004 Sep;6(5):367-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
C J Ostgren
J. Merlo
L. Råstam
U. Lindblad
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, Malmö University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
Source
Diabetes Obes Metab. 2004 Sep;6(5):367-74
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Atrial Fibrillation - complications - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - complications - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Hypertension - complications - epidemiology
Insulin Resistance
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
AIM: To explore the prevalence of atrial fibrillation in patients with hypertension and type 2 diabetes and to identify possible mechanisms for the development of atrial fibrillation. METHODS: A community-based, cross-sectional observational study was conducted in the primary health care in Skara, Sweden, and 1739 subjects (798 men, 941 women) were surveyed. Patients were categorized as those with hypertension only (n = 597); those with both hypertension and type 2 diabetes (n = 171), and those with type 2 diabetes only (n = 147). In the reference population, 824 normotensive subjects without diabetes were identified and used as controls. Participants were examined for cardiovascular risk factors including fasting blood glucose, serum insulin, blood pressure, lipids and anthropometric measures. Resting electrocardiogram (ECG) was recorded and Minnesota-coded. Insulin resistance was measured by the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA). RESULTS: Age-adjusted prevalence of atrial fibrillation was 2% in patients with hypertension only, 6% in patients with both hypertension and type 2 diabetes, 4% in patients with type 2 diabetes only and 2% in controls, respectively. Age and sex adjusted odds ratios (OR) (95% CI) were; hypertension 0.7 (0.30-1.5), combined hypertension and type 2 diabetes 3.3 (1.6-6.7), and type 2 diabetes 2.0 (0.9-4.7). The association with combined hypertension and type 2 diabetes remained significant when adjusted for cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors and body mass index (BMI), was attenuated with adjustment for ischemic ECG; 2.4 (1.1-5.0) and lost significance with adjustment for insulin resistance; 1.3 (0.5-3.1). CONCLUSIONS: Atrial fibrillation is associated with the combined occurrence of type 2 diabetes and hypertension. Insulin resistance may be a common underlying mechanism.
PubMed ID
15287930 View in PubMed
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Atrial fibrillation, stroke risk, and warfarin therapy revisited: a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107741
Source
Stroke. 2013 Nov;44(11):3103-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Staffan Björck
Bo Palaszewski
Leif Friberg
Lennart Bergfeldt
Author Affiliation
From the Department of Health Care Evaluation, Regionens Hus, Gothenburg, Sweden (S.B., B.P.); Department of Cardiology, Danderyd Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden (L.F.); and Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine/Cardiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden (L.B.).
Source
Stroke. 2013 Nov;44(11):3103-8
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anticoagulants - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Atrial Fibrillation - complications - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Hypertension - complications - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Prevalence
Registries
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Stroke - complications - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Warfarin - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Abstract
Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a major risk factor for ischemic stroke. This study aims to update the knowledge about AF and associated stroke risk and benefits of anticoagulation.
We extracted data from the hospital, specialized outpatient, and primary healthcare and drug registries in a Swedish region with 1.56 million residents. We identified all individuals who had received an AF diagnosis during the previous 5 years; all stroke events during 2010; and patients with AF aged =50 years who had received warfarin during 2009.
AF had been diagnosed in 38 446 subjects who were alive at the beginning of 2010 (prevalence of 3.2% in the adult [=20 years] population); ˜46% received warfarin therapy. In 2010, there were 4565 ischemic stroke events and 861 intracranial hemorrhages. AF had been diagnosed in 38% of ischemic events (=50% among those aged =80 years) and in 23% of intracranial hemorrhages. An AF diagnosis was often lacking in hospital discharge records after stroke events. Warfarin therapy was associated with an odds ratio of 0.50 (confidence interval, 0.43-0.57) for ischemic stroke and, despite an increased risk of intracranial hemorrhage, an odds ratio of 0.57 (confidence interval, 0.50-0.64) for the overall risk for stroke.
AF is more common than present guidelines suggest. The attributable risk of AF for ischemic stroke increases with age and is close to that of hypertension in individuals aged =80 years. Because a majority of patients with AF with increased risk for stroke had not received anticoagulation therapy, there is a large potential for improvement.
PubMed ID
23982711 View in PubMed
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147 records – page 1 of 15.