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No evidence for marked ethnic differences in accuracy of self-reported diabetes, hypertension, and hypercholesterolemia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160366
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 2007 Dec;60(12):1271-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
Fatima El Fakiri
Marc A Bruijnzeels
Arno W Hoes
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Policy and Management, Erasmus Medical Centre Rotterdam, PO Box 1738, 3000 DR Rotterdam, The Netherlands. fatima.elfakiri@gmail.com
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 2007 Dec;60(12):1271-9
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cardiovascular Diseases - ethnology - etiology - prevention & control
Diabetes Mellitus - diagnosis - ethnology
Diabetic Angiopathies - ethnology
Ethnic Groups - psychology
Family Practice
Female
Humans
Hypercholesterolemia - complications - diagnosis - ethnology
Hypertension - complications - diagnosis - ethnology
Male
Medical Records
Middle Aged
Netherlands - epidemiology
Reproducibility of Results
Risk factors
Self Disclosure
Abstract
To assess whether the accuracy of self-reported diabetes, hypertension, and hypercholesterolemia in high-risk groups differs according to ethnicity.
We analyzed data of 430 patients at high risk of cardiovascular disease from different ethnic origin, including Turkish, Surinamese, and Dutch. Risk factors based on self-reports were compared with data from medical records and with a gold standard based on clinical measurements. Proportions of concordance between self-reports and other methods and kappa statistics (kappa) were determined by ethnicity.
Concordance between self-reports and other data sources was highest in diabetes and lowest for hypercholesterolemia. Agreement of self-reports was substantial to almost perfect for diabetes (kappa: 0.84-0.76), substantial to moderate for hypertension (kappa: 0.63-0.51), and moderate for hypercholesterolemia (kappa: 0.55-0.48). There was no statistically significant association between ethnicity and concordance, except for self-reporting of diabetes among Surinamese vs. Dutch indigenous patients (odds ratio=0.37; 95% confidence interval: 0.14-0.97).
There are no marked ethnic differences in the accuracy of self-reports of diabetes, hypertension, and hypercholesterolemia in high-risk populations. Larger studies including multiple ethnic groups are needed to confirm these findings.
PubMed ID
17998082 View in PubMed
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