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IgE-mediated allergy to wood dusts probably does not explain the high prevalence of respiratory symptoms among Swedish woodwork teachers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214762
Source
Allergy. 1995 Jul;50(7):559-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1995
Author
M. Ahman
M. van Hage-Hamsten
S G Johansson
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine at Karolinska Institute, Huddinge Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Allergy. 1995 Jul;50(7):559-62
Date
Jul-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Dust
Female
Humans
Hypersensitivity - complications - immunology
Immunoglobulin E - immunology
Male
Occupational Diseases - etiology
Prevalence
Radioallergosorbent Test
Respiration Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Sweden
Teaching
Wood
Abstract
A previous study revealed an increased occurrence of work-related respiratory complaints among Swedish woodwork teachers. For determination of whether an IgE-mediated mechanism was the cause of the symptoms, 127 woodwork teachers and 111 reference subjects (other school personnel) in Stockholm gave serum for analysis of total IgE, Phadiatop, and RAST to extract of sawdust from five commonly used Scandinavian woods (pine, birch, juniper, alder, and linden). The total serum-IgE level was similar in the woodwork teachers (geometric mean 35, range
PubMed ID
8588687 View in PubMed
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Specific IgE positivity against inhalant allergens and development of autoimmune disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271586
Source
Autoimmunity. 2015;48(5):282-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Tea Skaaby
Lise Lotte Nystrup Husemoen
Betina Heinsbæk Thuesen
Runa Vavia Fenger
Allan Linneberg
Source
Autoimmunity. 2015;48(5):282-8
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Allergens - immunology
Antibody Specificity - immunology
Autoimmune Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Hypersensitivity - complications - immunology
Immunoglobulin E - immunology
Male
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Risk factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
Allergic and autoimmune diseases have been suggested to be inversely associated. We investigated the association between atopy and development of any and specific types of autoimmune disease.
We included a total of 14,849 individuals from five population-based studies with measurements of atopy defined as specific IgE positivity against inhalant allergens. We followed the participants by linkage to the Danish National Patient Register (median follow-up time 11.2 years). Hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) of autoimmune disease were estimated by Cox regression.
The risk for atopics versus non-atopics was: for any autoimmune disease (HR?=?0.99, 95% CI: 0.83, 1.18), thyrotoxicosis (HR?=?0.69, 95% CI: 0.34, 1.37), type 1 diabetes (HR?=?1.16, 95% CI: 0.84, 1.60), multiple sclerosis (HR?=?1.97, 95% CI: 0.95, 4.11), iridocyclitis (HR?=?0.82, 95% CI: 0.38, 1.74), Crohn's disease (HR?=?1.03, 95% CI: 0.47, 2.25), ulcerative colitis (HR?=?0.93, 95% CI: 0.52, 1.69), psoriasis vulgaris (HR?=?1.50, 95% CI: 0.86, 2.62), seropositive rheumatoid arthritis (HR?=?0.74, 95% CI: 0.48, 1.14) and polymyalgia rheumatica (HR?=?0.79, 95% CI: 0.44, 1.44).
We found no statistically significant associations between atopy and autoimmune disease, but we cannot exclude relatively small to moderate effects - protective or promotive - of atopy on autoimmune disease.
PubMed ID
25600125 View in PubMed
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