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Pesticide use, immunologic conditions, and risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma in Canadian men in six provinces.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126391
Source
Int J Cancer. 2012 Dec 1;131(11):2650-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1-2012
Author
Manisha Pahwa
Shelley A Harris
Karin Hohenadel
John R McLaughlin
John J Spinelli
Punam Pahwa
James A Dosman
Aaron Blair
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, 155 College Street, Toronto, Ontario, M5T 3M7.
Source
Int J Cancer. 2012 Dec 1;131(11):2650-9
Date
Dec-1-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asthma - complications - immunology
Canada
Case-Control Studies
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Gasoline - poisoning
Herbicides - poisoning
Humans
Hypersensitivity - complications - immunology
Incidence
Insecticides - poisoning
Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin - chemically induced - immunology
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Odds Ratio
Pesticides - poisoning
Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal - complications - immunology
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Abstract
Pesticide exposures and immune suppression have been independently associated with the risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), but their joint effect has not been well explored. Data from a case-control study of men from six Canadian provinces were used to evaluate the potential effect modification of asthma, allergies, or asthma and allergies and hay fever combined on NHL risk from use of: (i) any pesticide; (ii) any organochlorine insecticide; (iii) any organophosphate insecticide; (iv) any phenoxy herbicide; (v) selected individual pesticides [1,1'-(2,2,2-trichloroethylidene)bis[4-chlorobenzene]; 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl) ethane (DDT), malathion, (4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)acetic acid (MCPA), mecoprop, and (2,4-dichlorophenoxy)acetic acid (2,4-D); and (vi) from the number of potentially carcinogenic pesticides. Incident NHL cases (n = 513) diagnosed between 1991 and 1994 were recruited from provincial cancer registries and hospitalization records and compared to 1,506 controls. A stratified analysis was conducted to calculate odds ratios (ORs) adjusted for age, province, proxy respondent, and diesel oil exposure. Subjects with asthma, allergies, or hay fever had non-significantly elevated risks of NHL associated with use of MCPA (OR = 2.67, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.90-7.93) compared to subjects without any of these conditions (OR = 0.81, 95% CI: 0.39-1.70). Conversely, those with asthma, allergies, or hay fever who reported use of malathion had lower risks of NHL (OR = 1.25, 95% CI: 0.69-2.26) versus subjects with none of these conditions (OR = 2.44, 95% CI: 1.65-3.61). Similar effects were observed for asthma and allergies evaluated individually. Although there were some leads regarding effect modification by these immunologic conditions on the association between pesticide use and NHL, small numbers, measurement error and possible recall bias limit interpretation of these results.
PubMed ID
22396152 View in PubMed
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Specific IgE positivity against inhalant allergens and development of autoimmune disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271586
Source
Autoimmunity. 2015;48(5):282-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Tea Skaaby
Lise Lotte Nystrup Husemoen
Betina Heinsbæk Thuesen
Runa Vavia Fenger
Allan Linneberg
Source
Autoimmunity. 2015;48(5):282-8
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Allergens - immunology
Antibody Specificity - immunology
Autoimmune Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Hypersensitivity - complications - immunology
Immunoglobulin E - immunology
Male
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Risk factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
Allergic and autoimmune diseases have been suggested to be inversely associated. We investigated the association between atopy and development of any and specific types of autoimmune disease.
We included a total of 14,849 individuals from five population-based studies with measurements of atopy defined as specific IgE positivity against inhalant allergens. We followed the participants by linkage to the Danish National Patient Register (median follow-up time 11.2 years). Hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) of autoimmune disease were estimated by Cox regression.
The risk for atopics versus non-atopics was: for any autoimmune disease (HR?=?0.99, 95% CI: 0.83, 1.18), thyrotoxicosis (HR?=?0.69, 95% CI: 0.34, 1.37), type 1 diabetes (HR?=?1.16, 95% CI: 0.84, 1.60), multiple sclerosis (HR?=?1.97, 95% CI: 0.95, 4.11), iridocyclitis (HR?=?0.82, 95% CI: 0.38, 1.74), Crohn's disease (HR?=?1.03, 95% CI: 0.47, 2.25), ulcerative colitis (HR?=?0.93, 95% CI: 0.52, 1.69), psoriasis vulgaris (HR?=?1.50, 95% CI: 0.86, 2.62), seropositive rheumatoid arthritis (HR?=?0.74, 95% CI: 0.48, 1.14) and polymyalgia rheumatica (HR?=?0.79, 95% CI: 0.44, 1.44).
We found no statistically significant associations between atopy and autoimmune disease, but we cannot exclude relatively small to moderate effects - protective or promotive - of atopy on autoimmune disease.
PubMed ID
25600125 View in PubMed
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