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Source
Allergy. 2005 Sep;60(9):1116-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2005
Author
B. Lindelöf
F. Granath
M. Tengvall-Linder
A. Ekbom
Author Affiliation
Unit of Dermatology and Venereology, Karolinska University Hospital and Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Allergy. 2005 Sep;60(9):1116-20
Date
Sep-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Epidemiologic Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypersensitivity - complications - immunology
Immune Tolerance - immunology
Immunoglobulin E - immunology
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - complications - immunology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Conflicting results have provided support for two distinct and contradictory hypotheses: (i) allergy has a protective effect against cancer by enhanced immune surveillance, and (ii) allergy is associated with an increased risk of cancer by chronic immune stimulation. We therefore aimed us to perform a large epidemiological study with a defined allergic disease cohort. METHODS: During the years 1988-2000, 70 136 patients tested for total serum immunoglobulin E (IgE) and 57 815 tested with Phadiatop for diagnosing allergic disease at Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden, were linked with the Swedish Cancer Registry for a virtually complete follow up with regard to cancer. FINDINGS: The total number of observed cancers was normal in the total serum IgE-cohort; standardized incidence ratio (SIR) = 0.98 (95% CI: 0.92-1.04) and in the Phadiatop-cohort: SIR = 0.99 (0.92-1.06) independent of the level of IgE and positive or negative Phadiatop. Specific analysis was done for cancer of the lung, cervix, pancreas, lymphoma, and nonmelanoma skin cancer. None of these forms of cancer had increased risks. INTERPRETATION: The study does not support the hypothesis that allergy has a protective effect against cancer, nor does it support an increased risk.
Notes
Comment In: Allergy. 2005 Sep;60(9):1095-716076291
PubMed ID
16076294 View in PubMed
Less detail

Birch pollen-related food hypersensitivity: influence of total and specific IgE levels. A multicenter study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature40100
Source
Allergy. 1983 Jul;38(5):353-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1983
Author
N E Eriksson
J A Wihl
H. Arrendal
Source
Allergy. 1983 Jul;38(5):353-7
Date
Jul-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Antibody Specificity
Child
Female
Food Hypersensitivity - complications - immunology
Fruit - adverse effects
Humans
Immunoglobulin E - analysis
Male
Middle Aged
Nuts - adverse effects
Pollen - immunology
Radioallergosorbent Test
Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal - complications - diagnosis - immunology
Skin Tests
Sweden
Trees
Abstract
Total IgE, RAST results with tree pollen allergens, and prick test results with birch, grass and mugwort pollen allergens were correlated to 872 hay fever patients' reported food hypersensitivity (FH). A positive correlation was found between FH and the RAST and prick test results with birch pollen allergen. At each level of birch pollen sensitivity the incidence of FH was lower in patients with high total IgE than in those with lower total IgE. A negative correlation was found between grass pollen allergy and FH in birch pollen allergics. It is suggested that antigens in some foods have a specific ability to bridge anti-birch IgE molecules on mast cells. An explanation of the negative correlation between FH and total IgE and grass pollen allergy could be that a high number of non-birch-specific IgE molecules on the mast cells will reduce the probability that two anti-birch IgE molecules should bind on nearby sites.
PubMed ID
6614407 View in PubMed
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Eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) in school children living in a mountainous area of Norway: a population-based study of ECP as a tool for diagnosing asthma in children with reference values.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15521
Source
Allergy. 2001 Feb;56(2):138-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2001
Author
F. Nja
O D Røksund
K H Carlsen
Author Affiliation
Geilomo Children's Hospital for Asthma and Allergy, Geilo and Sandvika, Norway.
Source
Allergy. 2001 Feb;56(2):138-44
Date
Feb-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Animal Population Groups - immunology
Animals
Asthma - blood - diagnosis - etiology - physiopathology
Blood Proteins - analysis
Child
Eosinophil Granule Proteins
Humans
Hypersensitivity - complications - immunology
Norway
Reference Standards
Reference Values
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Ribonucleases
Sensitivity and specificity
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Most previous studies on eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) have been performed on carefully selected groups of asthmatic patients. Few studies based upon population cohorts have been reported. The primary objective of the present study was to assess the usefulness of serum eosinophil cationic protein (s-ECP) in the diagnosis of asthma in schoolchildren and determine reference values based on measurements in healthy children. METHODS: The population consisted of 216 schoolchildren (aged 7-16 years) who in a previous questionnaire had reported asthma or asthma-like symptoms and a control group. The questionnaire study comprised the entire population of schoolchildren in Upper Hallingdal. After clinical assessment, blood samples, and skin prick tests, these subjects were then reclassified into four groups: atopic and nonatopic asthmatic and nonasthmatics. S-ECP was assessed in relation to atopy, asthma severity, allergen exposure, and sex. RESULTS: The asthma group (n = 105) had significantly higher mean s-ECP level than the nonasthma group (n = 111) (13.3 vs 8.3 microg/l, P
PubMed ID
11167374 View in PubMed
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[Estimation of the allergenicity of specialized canned baby food made from fish, vegetables, and grains]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31201
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2002;71(6):14-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
V V Gorbunova
I V Gmoshinskii
L S Abramova
L G Mamonova
V K Mazo
I Ia Kon'
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2002;71(6):14-8
Date
2002
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Allergens - adverse effects - immunology
Anaphylaxis - etiology - immunology
Animal Feed
Animals
Antibody Formation - immunology
Cereals
Child
Child, Preschool
Dietary Proteins - adverse effects - immunology
Disease Models, Animal
English Abstract
Fishes
Food Hypersensitivity - complications - immunology
Food Preservation
Humans
Infant
Infant Food - adverse effects
Male
Rats
Rats, Wistar
Vegetables
Abstract
The influence of consumption of rations containing canned baby foods from mirror carp and Black Sea mullet on severity of system anaphylactic reaction to model food allergen in rats was studied and the level of antibodies to proteins of Black Sea mullet, mirror carp, Alaska Pollack, trout and big head was determined in serum of infants, suffering from food allergy through immune-enzyme analysis.
PubMed ID
12522951 View in PubMed
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IgE-mediated allergy to wood dusts probably does not explain the high prevalence of respiratory symptoms among Swedish woodwork teachers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214762
Source
Allergy. 1995 Jul;50(7):559-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1995
Author
M. Ahman
M. van Hage-Hamsten
S G Johansson
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine at Karolinska Institute, Huddinge Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Allergy. 1995 Jul;50(7):559-62
Date
Jul-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Dust
Female
Humans
Hypersensitivity - complications - immunology
Immunoglobulin E - immunology
Male
Occupational Diseases - etiology
Prevalence
Radioallergosorbent Test
Respiration Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Sweden
Teaching
Wood
Abstract
A previous study revealed an increased occurrence of work-related respiratory complaints among Swedish woodwork teachers. For determination of whether an IgE-mediated mechanism was the cause of the symptoms, 127 woodwork teachers and 111 reference subjects (other school personnel) in Stockholm gave serum for analysis of total IgE, Phadiatop, and RAST to extract of sawdust from five commonly used Scandinavian woods (pine, birch, juniper, alder, and linden). The total serum-IgE level was similar in the woodwork teachers (geometric mean 35, range
PubMed ID
8588687 View in PubMed
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Increased incidence of autoimmune disorders as a late complication in children with early onset dermatitis and/or milk allergy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30356
Source
J Autoimmun. 2004 Jun;22(4):341-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2004
Author
Jorma Kokkonen
Aila Niinimäki
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Oulu University Hospital, P.O. Box 23, Fin-90029 OYS, Oulu, Finland. jorma.kokkonen@ppshp.fi
Source
J Autoimmun. 2004 Jun;22(4):341-4
Date
Jun-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Autoimmune Diseases - etiology - immunology
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Dermatitis, Atopic - complications - immunology
Female
Gastrointestinal Diseases - etiology - immunology
Humans
Infant
Male
Milk Hypersensitivity - complications - immunology
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Abstract
Subjects with atopic dermatitis and autoimmune disorders share some similar immune response disorders. The aim of this study was to see whether subjects with early onset atopic dermatitis run a risk of eventually developing autoimmune diseases. The results of a questionnaire of 145 adolescents (70 f, 75 m, mean age 18.2 years, range 16-23 years) was compared with those of a group of 262 controls (112 f, 150 m, mean age 17.5 years, range 16-21 years), 164 of whom reported no atopic symptoms and were treated as a separate group for statistical analysis. As compared with the non-atopic controls, the study group subjects showed a significantly increased incidence of autoimmune disorders (9% vs. 1%), the relative risk ratio of a subject with infantile onset atopic eczema getting a gastrointestinal (GI) immune-mediated disease being 2.4 (CI(95)2.1-2.8) and of getting some other autoimmune disorder 3.1 (CI(95)2.8-9.7). The positive skin prick tests showed a negative association with the manifestation of a GI or other autoimmune disorder. The subjects with infantile dermatitis also reported recurrent abdominal pains (23% vs. 15%), and milk-induced gastrointestinal symptoms (19% vs. 10%) significantly more even as young adults than the controls. Our study showed that infantile atopy increases a predisposition to autoimmune disorders, suggesting that these two entities might have a common immunological determinant. While a high incidence of chronic GI complaints among the study subjects suggests the ongoing activity of local immune responses. However, more detailed prospective studies are needed to confirm these observations.
PubMed ID
15120758 View in PubMed
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Lymphoid nodular hyperplasia and cow's milk hypersensitivity in children with chronic constipation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30049
Source
J Pediatr. 2004 Nov;145(5):606-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2004
Author
Sami Turunen
Tuomo J Karttunen
Jorma Kokkonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University Hospital Oulu, Finland.
Source
J Pediatr. 2004 Nov;145(5):606-11
Date
Nov-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Chronic Disease
Constipation - etiology - immunology
Female
Humans
Hyperplasia - complications - immunology
Ileum - pathology
Intestine, Large - pathology
Lymph Nodes - pathology
Lymphocyte Count
Male
Milk Hypersensitivity - complications - immunology
Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell, gamma-delta - metabolism
T-Lymphocyte Subsets
T-Lymphocytes
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the incidence of cow's milk allergy as evidenced by milk challenge and the findings of endoscopic and immunohistochemical examinations in children with chronic and refractory constipation. STUDY DESIGN: Thirty-five study subjects (mean age, 8.3 +/- 3.3 years; range, 3-15 years; 17 girls) and 15 control subjects (mean age, 11.7 +/- 3.2 years; range, 2-15 years; 9 girls) were studied by colonoscopy and a 4-week cow's milk elimination and challenge. RESULTS: Lymphoid nodular hyperplasia was the most prominent endoscopic finding in half of the subjects (46%), mostly occurring patchily in the transverse colon. Histologic findings other than lymphoid accumulation and mildly increased density of eosinophils were few. During the milk elimination and with supportive medication, 83% of subjects remitted. Constipation and/or other gastrointestinal or skin symptoms relapsed only in one third (34%) during the cow's milk challenge, these having significantly higher densities of intraepithelial gammadelta + T cells ( P
Notes
Comment In: J Pediatr. 2004 Nov;145(5):578-8015520750
PubMed ID
15520758 View in PubMed
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Pesticide use, immunologic conditions, and risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma in Canadian men in six provinces.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126391
Source
Int J Cancer. 2012 Dec 1;131(11):2650-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1-2012
Author
Manisha Pahwa
Shelley A Harris
Karin Hohenadel
John R McLaughlin
John J Spinelli
Punam Pahwa
James A Dosman
Aaron Blair
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, 155 College Street, Toronto, Ontario, M5T 3M7.
Source
Int J Cancer. 2012 Dec 1;131(11):2650-9
Date
Dec-1-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asthma - complications - immunology
Canada
Case-Control Studies
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Gasoline - poisoning
Herbicides - poisoning
Humans
Hypersensitivity - complications - immunology
Incidence
Insecticides - poisoning
Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin - chemically induced - immunology
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Odds Ratio
Pesticides - poisoning
Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal - complications - immunology
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Abstract
Pesticide exposures and immune suppression have been independently associated with the risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), but their joint effect has not been well explored. Data from a case-control study of men from six Canadian provinces were used to evaluate the potential effect modification of asthma, allergies, or asthma and allergies and hay fever combined on NHL risk from use of: (i) any pesticide; (ii) any organochlorine insecticide; (iii) any organophosphate insecticide; (iv) any phenoxy herbicide; (v) selected individual pesticides [1,1'-(2,2,2-trichloroethylidene)bis[4-chlorobenzene]; 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl) ethane (DDT), malathion, (4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)acetic acid (MCPA), mecoprop, and (2,4-dichlorophenoxy)acetic acid (2,4-D); and (vi) from the number of potentially carcinogenic pesticides. Incident NHL cases (n = 513) diagnosed between 1991 and 1994 were recruited from provincial cancer registries and hospitalization records and compared to 1,506 controls. A stratified analysis was conducted to calculate odds ratios (ORs) adjusted for age, province, proxy respondent, and diesel oil exposure. Subjects with asthma, allergies, or hay fever had non-significantly elevated risks of NHL associated with use of MCPA (OR = 2.67, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.90-7.93) compared to subjects without any of these conditions (OR = 0.81, 95% CI: 0.39-1.70). Conversely, those with asthma, allergies, or hay fever who reported use of malathion had lower risks of NHL (OR = 1.25, 95% CI: 0.69-2.26) versus subjects with none of these conditions (OR = 2.44, 95% CI: 1.65-3.61). Similar effects were observed for asthma and allergies evaluated individually. Although there were some leads regarding effect modification by these immunologic conditions on the association between pesticide use and NHL, small numbers, measurement error and possible recall bias limit interpretation of these results.
PubMed ID
22396152 View in PubMed
Less detail

Residual intestinal disease after milk allergy in infancy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32230
Source
J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2001 Feb;32(2):156-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2001
Author
J. Kokkonen
S. Tikkanen
E. Savilahti
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University Hospital, Oulu, Finland.
Source
J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2001 Feb;32(2):156-61
Date
Feb-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Breath Tests
Case-Control Studies
Cattle
Child
Endoscopy
Female
Growth
Humans
Immunoglobulin A - blood
Immunoglobulin G - blood
Intestinal Diseases - etiology
Lactose - immunology - metabolism
Lactose Intolerance - diagnosis
Lactose Tolerance Test
Male
Milk - immunology
Milk Hypersensitivity - complications - immunology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The subsidence of cow's milk allergy (CMA) has been a subject of controversy. In this study the authors examined whether children with this condition in infancy developed full tolerance or whether they continue to have vague gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms relating to the consumption of milk or dairy products and/or signs of mucosal lesion in the GI tract. METHODS: The authors reexamined 56 10-year-old subjects who manifested CMA before 1 year of age, and compared the results with a group of 204 randomly selected age-matched school children. Fifty-three and 90 subjects respectively attended a reexamination and were evaluated for growth, lactose tolerance, and immunoglobulin A (IgA)- and IgG-class antibodies to whole cow's milk. The subjects reporting milk-related GI symptoms were encouraged to do a 4-week blind elimination-challenge test with 1 week of low-lactose milk flour. Sixteen of the 25 children were able to complete the trial. RESULTS: Approximately half the study subjects (45%) reported milk-related GI symptoms, whereas the respective figure among the control subjects was 10%. Three of six study subjects and seven of 10 control subjects, although completing the challenge, responded with intestinal symptoms. The growth of the former CMA subjects was retarded compared with the control subjects, and the difference in height was most striking in those subjects still reporting milk-related GI symptoms. However, all subjects had normal hemoglobin and whole-blood folic acid levels. The CMA subjects had significantly (P = 0.014) lower concentrations of milk antibodies compared with the control subjects. Lactose malabsorption, defined as high counts in a hydrogen breath test and related clinical symptoms, was found in eight CMA subjects (14%) and six control subjects (3%). CONCLUSIONS: In a certain proportion of subjects with CMA in infancy, GI intolerance seems to persist even after small-dose tolerance has been achieved. The intestinal symptoms and the increased prevalence of lactose intolerance may be caused by a disturbance of the surface epithelial cells--a state to which the authors refer as residual intestinal disease.
PubMed ID
11321385 View in PubMed
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12 records – page 1 of 2.