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The 5alpha-reductase type II A49T and V89L high-activity allelic variants are more common in men with prostate cancer compared with the general population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173682
Source
Eur Urol. 2005 Oct;48(4):679-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2005
Author
Yvonne L Giwercman
Per-Anders Abrahamsson
Aleksander Giwercman
Virgil Gadaleanu
Göran Ahlgren
Author Affiliation
Department of Urology, Malmö University Hospital, Lund University, Wallenberg Laboratory, entrance 46, SE - 205 02 Malmö, Sweden. yvonne.giwercman@kir.mas.lu.se
Source
Eur Urol. 2005 Oct;48(4):679-85
Date
Oct-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
3-Oxo-5-alpha-Steroid 4-Dehydrogenase - blood - genetics
Aged
Alanine
Alleles
Arginine
Case-Control Studies
Dihydrotestosterone - blood
Disease Progression
Follow-Up Studies
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genotype
Glutamine
Humans
Leucine
Luteinizing Hormone - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Point Mutation
Polymorphism, Genetic
Prostatic Hyperplasia - blood - epidemiology - genetics
Prostatic Neoplasms - blood - epidemiology - genetics
Receptors, Androgen - blood - genetics
Risk factors
Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin - metabolism
Sweden - epidemiology
Terminal Repeat Sequences
Testosterone - blood
Threonine
Tumor Markers, Biological - blood
Valine
Abstract
To compare men with prostate disease with those from the general population regarding polymorphisms in the androgen receptor gene and in the 5alpha-reductase II (SRD5A2) gene.
The SRD5A2 polymorphisms A49T, V89L and R227Q, the androgen receptor CAG and GGN repeats and sex hormone status was investigated in men with prostate cancer (CaP) (n=89), benign prostate hyperplasia (n=45) and healthy military conscripts (n=223).
The SRD5A2 high-activity allele variants A49T AT and V89L LL were more frequent in CaP-patients compared to general population, p=0.026 and p=0.05, respectively. CaP progression was, however, independent of SRD5A2 variants. In contrary, men with GGN
PubMed ID
16039774 View in PubMed
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5-a reductase inhibitors, benign prostatic hyperplasia, and risk of male breast cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271757
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2015 Sep;26(9):1289-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2015
Author
Robinson D
Garmo H
Holmberg L
Stattin P
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2015 Sep;26(9):1289-97
Date
Sep-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
5-alpha Reductase Inhibitors - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Adrenergic alpha-Antagonists - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Breast Neoplasms, Male - chemically induced - pathology
Cohort Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prostatic Hyperplasia - drug therapy - pathology
Risk
Sweden
Abstract
5-a reductase inhibitors (5-ARI) have been suggested to increase the risk of male breast cancer. The aim of this study was to study the risk of breast cancer in men on 5-ARI, in men with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) not on 5-ARI, and in men without BPH.
We performed a population-based cohort study in Sweden with data from The Prescribed Drug Register, The Patient Register, and The Cancer Register. Men on 5-ARI, men on a-blockers, or men who had undergone a transurethral resection of the prostate (TUR-P) prior to or during 2006-2008 were included as exposed to BPH and a specific treatment thereof. For each exposed man, five unexposed men were selected. Risk of breast cancer was calculated in Cox proportional hazard models.
There were 124,183 exposed men and 545,293 unexposed men, and during follow-up (median 6 years), 99 men with breast cancer were diagnosed. Compared to unexposed men, men on 5-ARI had a hazard ratio (HR) of breast cancer of 0.74 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.27-2.03), men on a-blockers had HR 1.47 (95% CI 0.73-2.95), and men with a TUR-P had HR 1.99 (95% CI 1.05-3.75).
No increased risk of breast cancer was observed for men on 5-ARI. However, the increased risk of breast cancer among men who had undergone a TUR-P, a strong indicator of BPH, suggests that the endocrine milieu conducive to BPH is associated with male breast cancer.
Notes
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Cites: BMC Public Health. 2011;11:45021658213
PubMed ID
26109464 View in PubMed
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67 stereotypes of structural modification of the urothelium in various diseases of the urinary bladder and prostate.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature88843
Source
Bull Exp Biol Med. 2008 Oct;146(4):415-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
Nepomnyashchikh G I
Aidagulova S V
Nepomnyashchikh D L
Boboev M M
Isaenko V I
Abdullaev N A
Ivaninskii O I
Kunin I S
Author Affiliation
Institute of Regional Pathology and Pathomorphology, Siberian Division of the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Novosibirsk, Russia. pathol@soramn.ru
Source
Bull Exp Biol Med. 2008 Oct;146(4):415-9
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Atrophy - pathology
Cystitis - pathology
Female
Humans
Male
Metaplasia - pathology
Middle Aged
Prostate - pathology
Prostatic Diseases - pathology
Prostatic Hyperplasia - pathology
Prostatitis - pathology
Urinary Bladder - pathology
Urinary Bladder Diseases - pathology
Urinary Bladder Neoplasms - pathology
Urothelium - pathology
Young Adult
Abstract
Structural modification of the urothelium was studied in various diseases of the urinary bladder and prostate, including urinary bladder cancer, vibration cystopathy, chronic prostatitis, benign prostate hyperplasia, and chronic cystitis. The general phenomena of changes in urinary bladder epithelium were atrophy, squamous metaplasia, and instability of the urothelium (focal atrophy, dysplasia, hyperplasia, and metaplasia). This phenomenon can be interpreted as a morphological marker for cancer risk.
PubMed ID
19489309 View in PubMed
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Abnormal mandibular growth and the condylar cartilage.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90327
Source
Eur J Orthod. 2009 Feb;31(1):1-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2009
Author
Pirttiniemi Pertti
Peltomäki Timo
Müller Lukas
Luder Hans U
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Development and Orthodontics, Institute of Dentistry, University of Oulu, Finland. pertti.pirttiniemi@oulu.fi
Source
Eur J Orthod. 2009 Feb;31(1):1-11
Date
Feb-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Arthritis, Juvenile Rheumatoid - complications
Cartilage Diseases - etiology
Cartilage, Articular - abnormalities - growth & development - injuries
Child
Craniofacial Abnormalities - complications
Facial Asymmetry - complications
Humans
Hyperplasia
Mandible - abnormalities - growth & development
Mandibular Condyle - abnormalities - growth & development - injuries
Mandibular Diseases - etiology
Mandibular Fractures - complications
Temporomandibular Joint Disorders - etiology
Abstract
Deviations in the growth of the mandibular condyle can affect both the functional occlusion and the aesthetic appearance of the face. The reasons for these growth deviations are numerous and often entail complex sequences of malfunction at the cellular level. The aim of this review is to summarize recent progress in the understanding of pathological alterations occurring during childhood and adolescence that affect the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and, hence, result in disorders of mandibular growth. Pathological conditions taken into account are subdivided into (1) congenital malformations with associated growth disorders, (2) primary growth disorders, and (3) acquired diseases or trauma with associated growth disorders. Among the congenital malformations, hemifacial microsomia (HFM) appears to be the principal syndrome entailing severe growth disturbances, whereas growth abnormalities occurring in conjunction with other craniofacial dysplasias seem far less prominent than could be anticipated based on their often disfiguring nature. Hemimandibular hyperplasia and elongation undoubtedly constitute the most obscure conditions that are associated with prominent, often unilateral, abnormalities of condylar, and mandibular growth. Finally, disturbances of mandibular growth as a result of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and condylar fractures seem to be direct consequences of inflammatory and/or mechanical damage to the condylar cartilage.
PubMed ID
19164410 View in PubMed
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Adipose tissue concentrations of persistent organic pollutants and the risk of prostate cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81490
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2006 Jul;48(7):700-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2006
Author
Hardell Lennart
Andersson Swen-Olof
Carlberg Michael
Bohr Louise
van Bavel Bert
Lindström Gunilla
Björnfoth Helen
Ginman Claes
Author Affiliation
Department of Oncology, University Hospital, Orebro, Sweden. lennart.hardell@orebroll.se
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2006 Jul;48(7):700-7
Date
Jul-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - physiology
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - metabolism
Prostate-Specific Antigen - analysis
Prostatic Hyperplasia - etiology
Risk assessment
State Medicine
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: We sought to study the concentrations of certain persistent organic pollutants with endocrine-disrupting properties in cases with prostate cancer and controls with benign prostate hyperplasia. METHODS: Adipose tissue was obtained from 58 cases and 20 controls. RESULTS: The median concentration among controls was used as cut-off in the statistical analysis. In the total material, a greater-than median concentration of PCB congener 153 yielded an odds ratio (OR) of 3.15 and 95% confidence interval (CI) of 1.04-9.54 and one chlordane type, trans-chlordane, yielded OR 3.49 (95% CI = 1.08-11.2). In the group of case subjects with PSA levels greater than the median level of 16.5 ng/mL, PCB 153 was OR 30.3 (95% CI = 3.24-284), hexachlorobenzene OR = 9.84 (95% CI = 1.99-48.5), trans-chlordane OR = 11.0 (95% CI = 1.87-64.9), and the chlordane-type MC6 OR = 7.58 (95% CI = 1.65-34.9). The grouping of PCBs according to structural and biological activity was found to produce significantly increased risks for enzyme and phenobarbital-inducing PCBs and lower chlorinated PCBs in the case group with PSA levels greater than 16.5 ng/mL. CONCLUSIONS: These chemicals might be of etiologic significance but need to be further investigated. The biological relevance of the arbitrary cut-off point of PSA is unclear.
PubMed ID
16832227 View in PubMed
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Adipose tissue distribution in postmenopausal women with adenomatous hyperplasia of the endometrium.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21246
Source
Gynecol Oncol. 1999 Feb;72(2):138-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1999
Author
T. Gredmark
S. Kvint
G. Havel
L A Mattsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Central Hospital, Skövde, Sweden.
Source
Gynecol Oncol. 1999 Feb;72(2):138-42
Date
Feb-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - pathology
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anthropometry
Body Composition
Body mass index
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Endometrial Hyperplasia - pathology
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Obesity - pathology
Postmenopause
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To investigate body fat distribution in postmenopausal women with adenomatous and atypical hyperplasia of the endometrium. METHODS: A prospective population-based case control study was performed in a health care county in Sweden. General obesity, as reflected by body mass index (BMI), and adipose tissue distribution, expressed as waist to hip circumference ratio (WHR), were evaluated in a cohort of 367 postmenopausal women who underwent dilatation and curettage because of uterine bleeding. The study group consisted of 29 women with adenomatous or atypical hyperplasia of the endometrium. The controls consisted of 49 age-matched postmenopausal women randomly selected from the computerized population register of the same region. RESULTS: The frequency of endometrial adenomatous and atypical hyperplasia in postmenopausal women with bleeding was 7.2%. In the total population of postmenopausal women the incidence of these endometrial lesions was 44 per 100,000 per year. Body weight (P = 0.039), BMI (P = 0.007), and WHR (P = 0.022) were higher in postmenopausal women with endometrial adenomatous and atypical hyperplasia than in controls. In multivariate analysis only BMI remained statistically associated with adenomatous hyperplasia (P = 0.012). CONCLUSIONS: General obesity, but neither upper nor lower body fat distribution, was characteristic of postmenopausal women with adenomatous and atypical hyperplasia of the endometrium. Overall obesity is a risk factor for these endometrial precancerous lesions, as it is also claimed to be for endometrial cancer.
PubMed ID
10021291 View in PubMed
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[Adrenal cortex hyperplasia in newborn infants. Promising results after screening]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59956
Source
Lakartidningen. 1989 Mar 29;86(13):1151
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-29-1989
Author
O. Westphal
Source
Lakartidningen. 1989 Mar 29;86(13):1151
Date
Mar-29-1989
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenal Hyperplasia, Congenital - epidemiology - psychology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Mass Screening - economics
Sweden
PubMed ID
2704265 View in PubMed
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Age, gender, dentures and oral mucosal disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205192
Source
Oral Dis. 1998 Mar;4(1):32-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1998
Author
M I MacEntee
N. Glick
E. Stolar
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Dentistry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
Oral Dis. 1998 Mar;4(1):32-6
Date
Mar-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Analysis of Variance
British Columbia - epidemiology
Cheilitis - epidemiology - etiology
Chi-Square Distribution
Dental Care for Aged - statistics & numerical data
Dentures - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Hyperplasia
Logistic Models
Male
Mouth Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Mouth Mucosa - pathology
Odds Ratio
Prevalence
Risk assessment
Sex Factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Stomatitis - epidemiology - etiology
Stomatitis, Denture - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
The numbers of participants over 75 years of age in previous studies of oral health have not been sufficient to permit a full investigation of the influence of age on the mouth. In this study a disproportionate stratified random sample of 255 independent elders was selected from a list of urban voters to provide similar numbers of men and women in three age groups. The subjects were interviewed and examined, and nearly half of them had mucosal disorders. There was a significant (P
PubMed ID
9655042 View in PubMed
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430 records – page 1 of 43.