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55 records – page 1 of 6.

[Acute sensorineural hearing loss (data of the otorhinolaryngologic clinic of the I.M. Sechenov Moscow Medical Academy)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211943
Source
Vestn Otorinolaringol. 1996 May-Jun;(3):12-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Iu M Ovchinnikov
N P Konstantinova
L N Mal'nikova
S V Morozova
Source
Vestn Otorinolaringol. 1996 May-Jun;(3):12-8
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academies and Institutes - history
Acute Disease
Ambulatory Care Facilities - history
Hearing Loss, Sensorineural - diagnosis - therapy
History, 20th Century
Humans
Hyperbaric Oxygenation
Moscow
Otolaryngology - history
Reflexotherapy
Abstract
The authors review the history of the research on acute neurosensory hypoacusis performed at the chair of ENT diseases of the I. M. Sechenov Moscow Medical Institute in 1916-1995. Etiological, pathogenetic, clinical, therapeutic and prophylactic aspects are considered. The investigators have developed and introduced into practice combined treatment of acute neurosensory hypoacusis the primary components of which are immediate hospitalization, chemotherapy in line with hyperbaric oxygenation and reflex therapy.
PubMed ID
8928368 View in PubMed
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Carboxyhemoglobin measurement by hospitals: implications for the diagnosis of carbon monoxide poisoning.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168666
Source
J Emerg Med. 2006 Jul;31(1):13-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2006
Author
Neil B Hampson
Karen L Scott
Jennette L Zmaeff
Author Affiliation
Section of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Center for Hyperbaric Medicine, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, Washington, USA.
Source
J Emerg Med. 2006 Jul;31(1):13-6
Date
Jul-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Carbon Monoxide Poisoning - blood - diagnosis - therapy
Carboxyhemoglobin - analysis
Humans
Hyperbaric Oxygenation
Idaho
Montana
Oximetry
Severity of Illness Index
Time Factors
Washington
Abstract
Most case definitions for carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning include demonstration of an elevated blood carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) concentration. Further, it is generally believed that treatment of CO poisoning is more effective when performed as soon as possible after the exposure. This suggests that a hospital's inability to measure blood COHb could lead to delayed or missed diagnosis or treatment. This study evaluated the ability of hospitals in the Pacific Northwest to measure COHb levels. The clinical laboratory of every acute care hospital in Washington, Idaho, Montana, and Alaska was surveyed regarding the ability to measure COHb levels, the method utilized and the time required. If they could not measure COHb, they were asked whether samples are sent elsewhere, the location of the referral laboratory, and time required. Results were then compared to the list of hospitals referring CO-poisoned patients to a regional center for hyperbaric oxygen therapy from 2003-2004. In the four states, only 44% of acute care hospitals have the capability to measure COHb. The remaining 56% send blood samples to other laboratories. The average time to get a result is 10 +/- 10 min in hospitals with co-oximetry and 904 +/- 1360 min in those without, a difference of 15 h (p
PubMed ID
16798147 View in PubMed
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Chamber personnel's use of Nitrox 50 during hyperbaric oxygen treatment: a quality study--research report.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106185
Source
Undersea Hyperb Med. 2013 Sep-Oct;40(5):395-402
Publication Type
Article
Author
Marco B Hansen
Tejs Jansen
Michael B Sifakis
Ole Hyldegaard
Erik C Jansen
Author Affiliation
Hyperbaric Unit, Department of Anesthesia, Centre of Head and Orthopedics, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. Marco.Bo.Hansen.02@regionh.dk
Source
Undersea Hyperb Med. 2013 Sep-Oct;40(5):395-402
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Atmosphere Exposure Chambers
Decompression Sickness - prevention & control
Denmark
Feasibility Studies
Female
Health Personnel
Humans
Hyperbaric Oxygenation - methods - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Nitrogen - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Occupational Diseases - prevention & control
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Oxygen - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Patient care team
Prospective Studies
Research Report
Time Factors
Abstract
We aimed to evaluate the feasibility and safety of using Nitrox 50 as breathing gas during attendance in a multiplace hyperbaric chamber.
Paper logs between Jan.-Dec. 2011 were reviewed to analyze nitrogen gas-loading, actual bottom time, total bottom time and surface interval time. With the use of the Norwegian Diving Tables nitrogen gas-loading was converted to Repetitive Group Letters. Symptoms of decompression sickness and health problems related to hyperbaric exposures were registered at weekly staff meetings. The chamber personnel breathed chamber air or Nitrox 50.
1,207 hyperbaric exposures were distributed to five chamber attendants and technicians, 14 doctors, and six nurses. Nitrox 50 was inhaled on 978 occasions (81.0%). Median nitrogen gas-loading after first pressurization complied with Repetitive Group Letter A (range A-E), second to C (range A-F), third to D (range A-F), fourth to E (range C-H), fifth to F (range C-H), and sixth to E (range B-G). No symptoms of decompression sickness were reported (95% CI 0.00-0.33%).
Breathing Nitrox 50 during repetitive hyperbaric sessions seems to be feasible and safe while meeting high demands in number of treatment sessions and patient flow and with fewer people employed in the hyperbaric unit.
PubMed ID
24224283 View in PubMed
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[Current problems in oncology II. Long-term course of oncology in Moscow, October, November 1975].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature250874
Source
Cas Lek Cesk. 1976 Jul 16;115(28):864-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-16-1976

Decompression illness (DCI) in Finland 1999-2018: Special emphasis on technical diving.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature307752
Source
Diving Hyperb Med. 2019 Dec 20; 49(4):259-265
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-20-2019
Author
Richard V Lundell
Olli Arola
Jari Suvilehto
Juha Kuokkanen
Mika Valtonen
Anne K Räisänen-Sokolowski
Author Affiliation
Diving Medical Centre, Centre for Military Medicine, Finnish Defence Forces, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Diving Hyperb Med. 2019 Dec 20; 49(4):259-265
Date
Dec-20-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Cold Temperature
Decompression - adverse effects
Decompression Sickness - epidemiology - therapy
Diving - adverse effects - physiology
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Hyperbaric Oxygenation
Recreation
Abstract
This is the first published study on decompression illness (DCI) and its treatment in Finland. Diving conditions are demanding, as even in the summer the water temperature below 20 meters' sea/fresh water (msw/mfw) is 4-10°C. Technical diving has become more popular over the years, so the emphasis of this study was to describe DCI in technical divers and compare it with non-technical recreational divers.
This study includes by estimation over 95% of all hyperbaric oxygen-treated DCI patients during the years 1999-2018 (n = 571). The cases were divided into technical divers (n = 200) and non-technical divers (n = 371). We focused on the differences between these two groups. Technical diving was defined as the usage of mixed breathing gases, closed circuit rebreather diving or planned decompression diving.
The mean annual number of treated DCI cases in Finland was 29 (range 16-38). The number of divers treated possibly indicate a shift towards technical diving. Technical dives were deeper and longer and were mainly performed in cold water or an overhead environment. Technical divers were more likely to utilize first aid 100% oxygen (FAO2) and sought medical attention earlier than non-technical divers. Symptom profiles were similar in both groups. Recompression was performed using USN Treatment Table Six in the majority of the cases and resulted in good final outcome. Eighty two percent were asymptomatic on completion of all recompression treatment(s).
This 20-year observational study indicates a shift towards technical diving, and hence a more demanding and challenging style of diving among Finnish divers, with a surprisingly constant number of DCI cases over the years. There is still need for improvement in divers' education in use of FAO2 for DCI symptoms. Fortunately, the outcome after recompression therapy is generally successful.
PubMed ID
31828744 View in PubMed
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Decompression illness treated in Denmark 1999-2013.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274359
Source
Diving Hyperb Med. 2016 Jun;46(2):87-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2016
Author
Christian Svendsen Juhl
Morten Hedetoft
Daniel Bidstrup
Erik Christian Jansen
Ole Hyldegaard
Source
Diving Hyperb Med. 2016 Jun;46(2):87-91
Date
Jun-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Body Height
Body mass index
Body Weight
Certification
Decompression Sickness - complications - epidemiology - therapy
Denmark - epidemiology
Diving - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Hyperbaric Oxygenation - statistics & numerical data
Incidence
Linear Models
Male
Pain - epidemiology
Paresthesia - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Surveys and Questionnaires
Symptom Assessment
Vertigo - epidemiology
Abstract
The incidence, diver characteristics and symptomatology of decompression illness (DCI) in Denmark has not been assessed since 1982, and the presence of long-term residual symptoms among divers receiving hyperbaric oxygen therapy in Denmark has never been estimated to our knowledge.
We undertook a retrospective study of the incidence and characteristics of DCI cases in Denmark for the period of 1999 to 2013. Medical records and voluntary questionnaires were reviewed, extracting data on age, gender, weight, height, diver certification level, diving experience, number of previous dives, type of diving, initial type of hyperbaric treatment and DCI symptoms. Trend in annual case numbers was evaluated using run chart analysis and Spearman's correlation. Age, height, weight, and BMI were evaluated using linear regression. The presence of long-term residual symptoms was investigated by phone interviewing the subgroup of divers treated in 2009 and 2010.
Two-hundred-and-five DCI cases were identified. The average annual case load was 14 with no significant trend during the study period (P = 0.081). Nor did we find any trend in age, weight, height or BMI. The most frequent symptoms were paraesthesia (50%), pain (42%) and vertigo (40%). Thirteen out of the subgroup of 30 divers had residual symptoms at discharge from hospital, and six out of 24 of these divers had residual symptoms at the time of follow-up.
We observed a more than ten-fold increase in DCI-cases since the period 1966-1980. In the subgroup of divers treated in 2009/2010, a quarter had long-term residual symptoms as assessed by telephone interview, which is in keeping with the international literature, but still a reminder that DCI can have life-long consequences.
PubMed ID
27334996 View in PubMed
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[Effect of hyperbaric oxygenation of lipid peroxidation and the antioxidant system in liver of white rats with acute sodium nitrate poisoning]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46299
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 1998 May-Jun;70(3):91-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
L Iu Glebova
Author Affiliation
Ukrainian Medical Stomatological Academy, Poltava.
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 1998 May-Jun;70(3):91-5
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Animals
Antioxidants - metabolism
Catalase - metabolism
English Abstract
Hyperbaric Oxygenation
Lipid Peroxidation
Liver - drug effects - enzymology - metabolism
Nitrates - poisoning
Rats
Rats, Wistar
Superoxide Dismutase - metabolism
Abstract
The experimental study carried out with white rats Wistar trend, which were introduced of sodium nitrate at a rate of 9.6 g/kg of their mass. It follows to the development of considerable activation of lipid peroxidation and depression of antioxidant system in liver. The obtained results permit supposing the significant role of nitric oxide (NO) in liver as a factor resulting in accumulation of peroxidation products. The research has stated that the use hyperbaric oxygenation (HBO) prevents considerable activation of lipid peroxidation and the decrease of antioxidant enzyme (catalase and superoxide dismutase) activity. The results permit supposing that the effect HBO is connected with the decrease of the rate of reduction of nitrate-ions to NO.
PubMed ID
9848187 View in PubMed
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[Enhancing the efficiency of sanatorium and resort rehabilitation of the liquidators of the Chernobyl accident by hyperbaric oxygenation]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45897
Source
Lik Sprava. 2003 Apr-Jun;(3-4):21-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
V O Ovod
I T Shymonko
Source
Lik Sprava. 2003 Apr-Jun;(3-4):21-5
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
English Abstract
Health Resorts
Humans
Hyperbaric Oxygenation
Mineral Waters - administration & dosage
Power Plants
Radiation Injuries - rehabilitation
Ukraine
Abstract
Results of our studies permit reaching the conclusion that oral intake of the mineral water Naftusya as the leading factor with an additional prescription of the course of the hyperbaric oxygenation procedures promote enhancement of functional reserves, stabilize free-radical processes and bodily system of antioxidant defence, favour stabilization of cell membranes, initiate decorporative action, diminish depression of immunity and supply oxygen to those enzymic systems whose activity has been adversely affected by hypoxia.
PubMed ID
12889350 View in PubMed
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55 records – page 1 of 6.