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The 2006 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations for the management of hypertension: Part I--Blood pressure measurement, diagnosis and assessment of risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168977
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2006 May 15;22(7):573-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-15-2006
Author
B R Hemmelgarn
Finlay A McAlister
Steven Grover
Martin G Myers
Donald W McKay
Peter Bolli
Carl Abbott
Ernesto L Schiffrin
George Honos
Ellen Burgess
Karen Mann
Thomas Wilson
Brian Penner
Guy Tremblay
Alain Milot
Arun Chockalingam
Rhian M Touyz
Sheldon W Tobe
Author Affiliation
Division of Nephrology, University of Calgary, and Foothills Hospital, 1403 29th Street Northwest, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. brenda.hemmelgarn@calgaryhealthregion.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2006 May 15;22(7):573-81
Date
May-15-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advisory Committees
Blood Pressure Determination
Canada
Echocardiography
Humans
Hyperaldosteronism - diagnosis
Hypertension - diagnosis
Mass Screening
Patient Education as Topic
Pheochromocytoma - diagnosis
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Abstract
To provide updated, evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis and assessment of adults with high blood pressure.
For persons in whom a high blood pressure value is recorded, a diagnosis of hypertension is dependent on the appropriate measurement of blood pressure, the level of the blood pressure elevation, the approach used to monitor blood pressure (office, ambulatory or home/self), and the duration of follow-up. In addition, the presence of cardiovascular risk factors and target organ damage should be assessed to determine the urgency, intensity and type of treatment. For persons diagnosed as having hypertension, estimating the overall risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes requires an assessment for other vascular risk factors and hypertensive target organ damage.
MEDLINE searches were conducted from November 2004 to October 2005 to update the 2005 recommendations. Reference lists were scanned, experts were polled, and the personal files of the authors and subgroup members were used to identify other studies. Identified articles were reviewed and appraised using prespecified levels of evidence by content and methodological experts. As per previous years, the authors only included studies that had been published in the peer-reviewed literature and did not include evidence from abstracts, conference presentations or unpublished personal communications.
The present document contains recommendations for blood pressure measurement, diagnosis of hypertension, and assessment of cardiovascular risk for adults with high blood pressure. These include the accurate measurement of blood pressure, criteria for the diagnosis of hypertension and recommendations for follow-up, assessment of overall cardiovascular risk, routine and optional laboratory testing, assessment for renovascular and endocrine causes, home and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, and the role of echocardiography for those with hypertension. Key features of the 2006 recommendations include continued emphasis on an expedited diagnosis of hypertension, an in-depth review of the role of global risk assessment in hypertension therapy, and the use of home/self blood pressure monitoring for patients with masked hypertension (subjects with hypertension who have a blood pressure that is normal in clinic but elevated on home/self measurement).
All recommendations were graded according to the strength of the evidence and were voted on by the 45 members of the Canadian Hypertension Education Program Evidence-Based Recommendations Task Force. All recommendations reported herein received at least 95% consensus. These guidelines will continue to be updated annually.
Notes
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2002 Jun;18(6):625-4112107420
Cites: CMAJ. 2005 Aug 30;173(5):480-316129865
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2001 May;17(5):543-5911381277
Cites: JAMA. 2001 Jul 11;286(2):180-711448281
Cites: Am J Hypertens. 2001 Nov;14(11 Pt 1):1099-10511724207
Cites: Clin Sci (Lond). 2001 Dec;101(6):671-911724655
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Cites: Am Heart J. 2000 Feb;139(2 Pt 1):272-8110650300
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Cites: BMJ. 2001 Apr 21;322(7292):977-8011312234
Cites: J Hypertens. 2002 Apr;20(4):579-8111910284
Cites: Stroke. 2002 Jul;33(7):1776-8112105351
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Cites: Eur Heart J. 2003 Jun;24(11):987-100312788299
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Cites: J Hum Hypertens. 2004 Nov;18(11):769-7315141270
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Cites: JAMA. 1996 May 22-29;275(20):1571-68622248
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 1996 Jul 8;156(13):1414-208678709
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 1998 Mar 23;158(6):655-629521231
Cites: JAMA. 2004 Nov 17;292(19):2350-615547162
Cites: Am J Hypertens. 2005 Jun;18(6):772-815925734
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2005 Jun;21(8):645-5616003448
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2005 Jun;21(8):657-7216003449
Cites: Blood Press Monit. 2002 Dec;7(6):293-30012488648
PubMed ID
16755312 View in PubMed
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Bartter's syndrome. A review of 28 patients followed for 10 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature65437
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1988;224(2):165-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Author
A. Rudin
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine II, Sahlgrenska Hospital, University of Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1988;224(2):165-71
Date
1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Bartter Syndrome - epidemiology - physiopathology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hyperaldosteronism - physiopathology
Hypokalemia - diagnosis - drug therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Potassium Chloride - administration & dosage
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications
Sweden
Abstract
Twenty-eight patients with Bartter's syndrome diagnosed during the years 1964-86 and followed for an average of 9.9 years have been reviewed. Their mean age at the time of diagnosis was 32.9 years. As a group they were shorter than normal subjects. In 19 patients hypokalaemia was detected incidentally. Neuromuscular symptoms, usually minor, had occurred in 19 subjects. Pregnancies and deliveries were unremarkable. One patient has died from malignant lymphoma, the others are alive. Of these, one patient has developed renal failure and received a renal transplant. The other patients have preserved a normal renal function and the majority have been healthy and working full time. Treatment rarely resulted in normokalaemia. The annual incidence of the syndrome has been estimated at 1.2 per million people.
PubMed ID
3421146 View in PubMed
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Clinical Characteristics and Long-Term Outcome of Primary Aldosteronism in a Norwegian Population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295513
Source
Horm Metab Res. 2017 Nov; 49(11):838-846
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2017
Author
Marianne Aardal Grytaas
Siri S Strømsøy
Jarle Tor Rørvik
Jarle Birger Arnes
Anette Heie
Thomas Arnesen
Melissa D Jørstad
Bjørn Gunnar Nedrebø
Dag Erik Jøssang
Dag Kjartan Jensen
Håvard D Rørvik
Jørn Vegard Sagen
Gunnar Mellgren
Hrafnkell B Thordarson
Eystein Sverre Husebye
Kristian Løvås
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
Source
Horm Metab Res. 2017 Nov; 49(11):838-846
Date
Nov-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adrenal Glands - diagnostic imaging
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cell Differentiation
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hyperaldosteronism - diagnostic imaging - genetics - pathology - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Reproducibility of Results
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Primary aldosteronism (PA) is the most common cause of secondary hypertension (HT). We describe here clinical characteristics, diagnostic procedures, and long-term outcomes in a Norwegian population. All suspected PA patients investigated at a tertiary centre from 1998–2012 were retrospectively evaluated. Inclusion criteria were verified PA after confirmatory testing or otherwise considered highly likely PA. Clinical, biochemical, radiological, and adrenal vein sampling (AVS) findings were analysed. Surgically removed adrenals were re-evaluated histopathologically and tested for somatic mutations. All patients still alive by August 2014 were invited to a follow-up visit. One-hundred and eight patients were included, of whom 85% had a history of hypokalaemia. PA was verified by confirmatory testing in 83 (77%), and AVS performed in 95 (88%) patients. The proportion with AVS-confirmed bilateral PA increased during the study period. Sixty-eight patients (63%) underwent adrenalectomy. KCNJ5 mutations were found in 30% of the surgical specimens and were associated with female sex and a florid PA phenotype. Follow-up visits were undertaken in 73/108 (68%), of whom 52 adrenalectomised. After adrenalectomy, 83% were biochemically cured of PA, but only 21% were cured for HT. Female sex, a verified adenoma, and KCNJ5 mutations were associated with cure of HT. In conclusion, the majority of our patients had unilateral PA and hypokalaemia, indicating that patients with bilateral and milder PA may still be underdiagnosed. Female sex, a histopathological adenoma, and the presence of KCNJ5 mutations predicted cure of HT after adrenalectomy, but the overall cure rate of HT was low.
PubMed ID
28922675 View in PubMed
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[Dynamics of aldosterone excretion in normal pregnancy and late toxicosis complications (review of the literature)]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature66889
Source
Pediatr Akus Ginekol. 1967 Jan-Feb;1:37-40
Publication Type
Article

High frequency of primary hyperaldosteronism among hypertensive patients from a primary care area in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81000
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2006 Sep;24(3):154-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006
Author
Westerdahl Christina
Bergenfelz Anders
Isaksson Anders
Wihl Anders
Nerbrand Christina
Valdemarsson Stig
Author Affiliation
Department of General Practice, Lund University, Sweden. cwesterdahl@telia.com
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2006 Sep;24(3):154-9
Date
Sep-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aldosterone - blood
Fludrocortisone - diagnostic use
Humans
Hyperaldosteronism - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Hypertension - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Middle Aged
Renin - blood
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To search for primary hyperaldosteronism (PHA) among previously known hypertensive patients in primary care, using the aldosterone/renin ratio (ARR), and to evaluate clinical and biochemical characteristics in patients with high or normal ratio. DESIGN: Patient survey study. SETTING AND SUBJECTS: The study population was recruited by written invitation among hypertensive patients in two primary care areas in Sweden. A total of 200 patients met the criteria and were included in the study. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The ARR was calculated from serum aldosterone and plasma renin concentrations. The cut-off level for ARR was set to 100, as confirmed in 28 healthy subjects. Patients with increased ARR were considered for a confirmatory test, using the fludrocortisone suppression test. RESULTS: Of 200 patients, 50 patients had ARR > 100; 26 patients were further evaluated by fludrocortisone suppression test. Seventeen of these patients had an incomplete aldosterone inhibition. CONCLUSION: In total 17 of 200 evaluated patients (8.5%) had an incomplete suppression with fludrocortisone. This confirms previous reports on a high frequency of PHA. No significant biochemical or clinical differences were found among hypertensive patients with PHA compared with the whole sample.
PubMed ID
16923624 View in PubMed
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The incidence rate of phaeochromocytoma and Conn's syndrome in Denmark, 1977-1981.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25772
Source
J Hum Hypertens. 1988 Oct;2(3):187-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1988
Author
G S Andersen
D B Toftdahl
J O Lund
S. Strandgaard
P E Nielsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Nephrology, Herlev Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
J Hum Hypertens. 1988 Oct;2(3):187-9
Date
Oct-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adrenal Gland Neoplasms - epidemiology
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Denmark
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hyperaldosteronism - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Pheochromocytoma - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
In the years 1977 to 1981, 47 cases of phaeochromocytoma and 19 cases of aldosterone-producing adrenal adenoma (Conn's syndrome) were diagnosed in Denmark as reported to the National Register of Hospital Patients. This corresponds to an average annual incidence of phaeochromocytoma and Conn's syndrome of 1.9 and 0.8 per million inhabitants, respectively. Treatment results were evaluated from the patient's records and follow-up questionnaires. Of 30 surviving patients operated upon for phaeochromocytoma and followed-up after 18-81 months, 23 were normotensive without treatment and seven were mildly to moderately hypertensive. Of 11 patients operated upon for Conn's syndrome, follow-up data at 1-2 years were obtained in seven, of whom five were normotensive and two hypertensive. Phaeochromocytoma and Conn's syndrome are rare diseases. The results of surgical treatment are often gratifying, but not all patients remain normotensive after surgery, even in the absence of recurrence of endocrine disease.
Notes
Comment In: J Hum Hypertens. 1989 Dec;3(6):4812607525
PubMed ID
3236322 View in PubMed
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[Is there an unrecognized epidemic of primary aldosteronism? The Danish Society of Hypertension]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93342
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2008 Mar 17;170(12):1030
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-17-2008

[Laparoscopic adrenalectomy. An alternative to open surgery of minor adrenal tumors]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21430
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1998 Sep 21;160(39):5645-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-21-1998
Author
P M Christiansen
N. Boye
T. Steiniche
J. Weeke
P. Wara
Author Affiliation
Arhus Universitetshospital, Arhus Amtssygehus, kirurgisk afdeling L.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1998 Sep 21;160(39):5645-7
Date
Sep-21-1998
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenal Gland Neoplasms - surgery
Adrenalectomy - methods
Adult
Aged
Cushing Syndrome - surgery
Denmark
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Hyperaldosteronism - surgery
Laparoscopy - methods
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Discharge
Pheochromocytoma - surgery
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
In the period February 1994 to November 1995 11 laparoscopic adrenalectomies were performed at our institution (seven women, four men). A transperitoneal approach was used in both right- and left-sided operations. Results were collected retrospectively. Indications for surgery were: Conn's syndrome (four), Cushing's syndrome (two), phaecromocytoma (four), and incidentaloma (one). The operations took median 170 minutes (range 105-250 minutes). Median size of the tumour was 4 cm range 1(1/2)-5 cm). No significant peri- or postoperative complications were recorded. The patients were discharged from the surgical unit median two days after surgery. Laparoscopic operation emerges as an alternative to open operation when dealing with smaller adrenal tumours. Because of the small number of patients, these operations have to be restricted to a few centres where both internists, anaesthesiologists and surgeons with expertise in this field are found.
PubMed ID
9771056 View in PubMed
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Outcome after surgery for primary hyperaldosteronism may depend on KCNJ5 tumor mutation status: a population-based study from Western Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112963
Source
Langenbecks Arch Surg. 2013 Aug;398(6):869-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2013
Author
Thomas Arnesen
Nina Glomnes
Siri Strømsøy
Stian Knappskog
Anette Heie
Lars A Akslen
Marianne Grytaas
Jan Erik Varhaug
Oliver Gimm
Michael Brauckhoff
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Haukeland University Hospital, 5021 Bergen, Norway.
Source
Langenbecks Arch Surg. 2013 Aug;398(6):869-74
Date
Aug-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenal Gland Neoplasms - genetics - physiopathology - surgery
Adrenalectomy - adverse effects - methods
Adult
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
G Protein-Coupled Inwardly-Rectifying Potassium Channels - genetics
Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Hyperaldosteronism - genetics - physiopathology - surgery
Laparoscopy - adverse effects - methods
Male
Middle Aged
Mutation
Norway
Postoperative Complications - genetics - physiopathology
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Primary aldosteronism (PA) is a frequent cause (about 10 %) of hypertension. Some cases of PA were recently found to be caused by mutations in the potassium channel KCNJ5. Our objective was to determine the mutation status of KCNJ5 and seven additional candidate genes for tumorigenesis: YY1, FZD4, ARHGAP9, ZFP37, KDM5C, LRP1B, and PDE9A and, furthermore, the surgical outcome of PA patients who underwent surgery in Western Norway.
Twenty-eight consecutive patients with aldosterone-producing adrenal tumors (20 patients with single adenoma, 8 patients with unilateral multiple adenomas or hyperplasia) who underwent surgery were included in this study. All patients were operated on by uncomplicated laparoscopic total adrenalectomy. Genomic DNA was isolated from tumor and non-tumor adrenocortical tissue, and DNA sequencing revealed the mutation status.
Ten out of 28 (36 %) patients with PA displayed tumor mutations in KCNJ5 (p. G151R and L168R) while none were found in the corresponding non-tumor samples. No mutations were found in the other seven candidate genes screened. The presence of KCNJ5 mutations was associated with lower blood pressure and a higher chance for cure by surgery when compared to patients harboring the KCNJ5 wild type.
KCNJ5 mutations are associated with a better surgical outcome. Preoperative identification of the mutation status might have impact on surgical strategy (total vs. subtotal adrenalectomy).
PubMed ID
23778974 View in PubMed
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17 records – page 1 of 2.