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1590 records – page 1 of 159.

3-year results of a collaborative school-based oral health program in a remote First Nations community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157485
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2008 Apr-Jun;8(2):882
Publication Type
Article
Author
A J Macnab
J. Rozmus
D. Benton
F A Gagnon
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia, Department of Pediatrics, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2008 Apr-Jun;8(2):882
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
British Columbia
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dental Care for Children - methods
Health Education - methods
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Indians, North American
Medically underserved area
Oral Hygiene - education - methods
School Health Services
Tooth Diseases - ethnology - prevention & control
Abstract
Surveys of dental health among Aboriginal children in Canada, using scales such as the Decayed, Missing, and Filled Teeth (DMFT) score, indicate that Aboriginal children have 2 to 3 times poorer oral health compared with other populations. A remote First Nations community approached requested assistance in addressing the health of their children. The objective was to work with the community to improve oral health and knowledge among school children. The hypothesis formulated was that after 3 years of the program there would be a significant decrease in dmft/DMFT (primary/permanent) score.
This was a cross-sectional study of all school-aged children in a small, remote First Nations community. Pre- and post- intervention evaluation of oral health was conducted by a dentist not involved in the study. The intervention consisted of a school-based program with daily brush-ins, fluoride application, educational presentations, and a recognition/incentive scheme.
Twenty-six children were assessed prior to the intervention, representing 45% of the 58 children then in the community. All 40 children in the community were assessed following the intervention. Prior to the intervention, 8% of children were cavity free. Following 3 years of the intervention, 32% were cavity free. Among the 13 children assessed both pre- and post-intervention, dmft/DMFT score improved significantly (p
PubMed ID
18444770 View in PubMed
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A 5-year retrospective analysis of employer-provided dental care for Finnish male industrial workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206874
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1997 Dec;25(6):419-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1997
Author
J. Ahlberg
R. Tuominen
H. Murtomaa
Author Affiliation
Department of Dental Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland. jari.ahlberg@helsinki.fi
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1997 Dec;25(6):419-22
Date
Dec-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
American Dental Association
DMF Index
Dental Care - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Dental Prophylaxis
Dental Records
Dental Restoration, Permanent
Dentures
Diagnosis-Related Groups
Finland - epidemiology
Health Education, Dental
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Health Services - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Oral Health
Oral Hygiene
Patient Education as Topic
Periodontal Diseases - therapy
Radiography, Dental
Retrospective Studies
Root Canal Therapy
Time Factors
United States
Abstract
The treatment-mix, treatment time, and dental status of 268 male industrial workers entitled to employer-provided dental care were studied. The data were collected from treatment records of the covered workers over the 5-year period 1989-93. Treatment time was based on clinical treatment time recorded per patient visit, and the treatment procedure codes were reclassified into a treatment-mix according to American Dental Association categories, with a modification combining endodontics and restorative treatment. The mean number of check-ups followed by prescribed treatment (treatment courses) during the 5 years was 3.7 among those who had entered the in-house dental care program prior to the monitored period (old attenders). Their treatment time was stable, 57-63 min per year, while the first-year mean treatment time (170 min) of those who had entered the program during the study period (new attenders) was significantly higher (P
PubMed ID
9429814 View in PubMed
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A 10-year follow-up study of fixed metal ceramic prosthodontics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75777
Source
J Oral Rehabil. 1997 Oct;24(10):713-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1997
Author
R. Näpänkangas
M A Salonen
A M Raustia
Author Affiliation
Department of Prosthetic Dentistry and Stomatognathic Physiology, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
J Oral Rehabil. 1997 Oct;24(10):713-7
Date
Oct-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cementation
Ceramics
Crowns
Dental Abutments
Dental Porcelain
Dental Prosthesis Design
Denture Design
Denture, Partial, Fixed
Esthetics, Dental
Evaluation Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gingival Hemorrhage - etiology
Gingival Pocket - etiology
Humans
Male
Metal Ceramic Alloys
Middle Aged
Oral Hygiene
Patient satisfaction
Post and Core Technique
Radiography, Dental
Retrospective Studies
Students, Dental
Surface Properties
Zinc Phosphate Cement
Abstract
The aim of this retrospective study was to record patients' satisfaction with fixed metal ceramic bridges and crowns made by dental students and to evaluate the functioning and condition of the bridges and crowns clinically and radiologically. Out of the 60 patients treated at the Institute of Dentistry during 1984-85, 30 patients attended the follow-up examination (16 women, mean age 39, range 23-62 years and 14 men, mean age 44, range 26-65 years). The anamnestic data and data regarding treatment procedures were collected from the patient files. The patients had been supplied with 41 crowns and 24 bridges (mean 3.9 units, range 3-6 units), which included 61 abutments and 33 pontics or cantilever extensions (abutment/pontic ratio 1.85: 1). Marginal fidelity was unsatisfactory in 13% of the crowns and bridges and gingival bleeding and pockets of 4-6 mm were noted in 27% and 12% of cases, respectively. None of the subjects had caries in the abutments.
PubMed ID
9372460 View in PubMed
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A 10-year prospective study of tobacco smoking and periodontal health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67464
Source
J Periodontol. 2000 Aug;71(8):1338-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2000
Author
J. Bergström
S. Eliasson
J. Dock
Author Affiliation
Department of Periodontology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
J Periodontol. 2000 Aug;71(8):1338-47
Date
Aug-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alveolar Bone Loss - epidemiology
Analysis of Variance
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Dental Plaque Index
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gingival Hemorrhage - epidemiology
Humans
Linear Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Music
Observer Variation
Oral Hygiene
Periodontal Diseases - epidemiology
Periodontal Pocket - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Smoking - epidemiology
Smoking Cessation - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: To date only a few studies have evaluated the long-term influence of smoking and smoking cessation on periodontal health. The present study, therefore, was undertaken with the aim to prospectively investigate the influence of smoking exposure over time on the periodontal health condition in a targeted population before and after a follow-up interval of 10 years. METHODS: The primary study base consisted of a population of occupational musicians that was investigated the first time in 1982 and scheduled for reinvestigation in 1992 and 2002. The 1992 investigation included 101 individuals from the baseline study constituting a prospective cohort including 16 smokers, who had continued to smoke throughout the entire length of the 10-year period; 28 former smokers who had ceased smoking an average of approximately 9 years before the commencement of the baseline study; 40 non-smokers, who denied ever having smoked tobacco; and 17 individuals whose smoking pattern changed or for whom incomplete data were available. The clinical and radiographic variables used for the assessment of the periodontal health condition of the individual were frequency of periodontally diseased sites (probing depth > or =4 mm), gingival bleeding (%), and periodontal bone height (%). The oral hygiene standard was evaluated by means of a standard plaque index. RESULTS: The changes over the 10 years with respect to frequency of diseased sites indicated an increased frequency in continuous smokers versus decreased frequencies in former smokers and non-smokers. Controlling for age and frequency of diseased sites at baseline, the 10-year change was significantly associated with smoking (P
PubMed ID
10972650 View in PubMed
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15 years of social crisis in the largest Circumpolar region: Hygienic implications.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature84149
Source
Pages 273-275 in N. Murphy and S. Krivoschekov, eds. Circumpolar Health 2006: Gateway to the International Polar Year. Proceedings of the 13th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Novosibirsk, Russia, 2006. Alaska Medicine. 2007;49(2 Suppl):273-275
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
15 Years of Social Crisis in the Largest Circumpolar Region: Hygienic Implications Mikhail A. Tyrylgin Yakutsk Scientific Centerf Russian Academy of Medical Sciences and the Government of the Sakha (Yakutia) Republicf Russia Abstract The aim of the study was to determine the nature and
  1 document  
Author
Tyrylgin, MA
Author Affiliation
Yakutsk Scientific Center, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Russia
Source
Pages 273-275 in N. Murphy and S. Krivoschekov, eds. Circumpolar Health 2006: Gateway to the International Polar Year. Proceedings of the 13th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Novosibirsk, Russia, 2006. Alaska Medicine. 2007;49(2 Suppl):273-275
Date
2007
Language
English
Geographic Location
Russia
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Circumpolar region
Health trends
Hygienical impact
Public Health
Social crisis
Abstract
The aim of the study was to determine the nature and size of the hygienical impact of social crisis on the public health of the population of a Circumpolar region. The study was carried out in the Sakha (Yakutia) Republic (area 3.1 million km2; population nearly 1 million). The analysis of health indicators was done using demographic and hygienical methods, and 15-year (1989-2005) statistical data from the Federal State Statistic Service division in the Sakha Republic. The study has yielded reliable data on public health trends of the population in the Sakha Republic. During a period of 15 years of social crisis, the population has declined by 13%, mainly due to the departure of 1/3 of the non-Aboriginal population, which clearly demonstrated the negative nature of social changes. The natural increase rate has been reduced to a 1/ 3. Marriage and family institutions were affected seriously, with twice more children born to single mothers and 2.6-fold more to fathers of a foreign origin. Incidence rates of alcoholic psychosis, chronic alcoholism and drug abuse increased 3.1- to 4.2-fold; and mortality associated with psycho-emotional stress (circulatory diseases, external causes of injury, digestive system diseases), 1.7- to 3.1-fold. Rates of mortality due to circulatory, respiratory and malignant neoplastic diseases were 1.6- to 2.7-fold lower than those in Russia in general. Such low mortality due to degenerative diseases was predetermined by the small percent of the elderly in the age structure (8.4%), which was 2.5-fold lower compared to Russia and developed countries. The public health status of the residents of Circumpolar areas was extremely sensitive to socioeconomic changes. The social crisis had a multifactorial effect on lifestyle, quality of life-supporting infrastructure, and particularly, on the medical care system, with highly negative hygienical implications.
PubMed ID
17929648 View in PubMed
Documents
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A 57-year follow-up of occlusal changes, oral health, and attitudes toward teeth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135775
Source
Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop. 2011 Apr;139(4 Suppl):S102-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Arild Stenvik
Lisen Espeland
Rolf E Berg
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthodontics, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop. 2011 Apr;139(4 Suppl):S102-8
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Attitude to Health
Case-Control Studies
Child
Dental Care - utilization
Esthetics, Dental
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Malocclusion - complications - pathology - psychology
Malocclusion, Angle Class III - etiology
Norway
Oral Health
Oral Hygiene - utilization
Photography, Dental
Self-Assessment
Temporomandibular Joint Disorders - etiology
Tooth Loss - etiology
Abstract
Very few studies have addressed long-term development and risks associated with untreated malocclusion. The purpose of this study was to examine changes in occlusion in a lifelong perspective and to compare oral health and attitudes toward teeth among persons with malocclusion with those having normal occlusion.
In 1950 an epidemiologic survey of 2349 8-year-olds was conducted and included 4 intraoral photographs. Three selected samples with different malocclusions (deep bite, crossbite, or irregular teeth) and 1 sample with normal occlusion (a total of 183 subjects) were, 57 years later, invited for examination and an extensive interview about dental experiences and attitudes. Sixty-nine responded (38%) and constitute the subjects studied.
Malocclusion remained the same or worsened except in subjects having deep bite in childhood, which in some improved and in others became worse. Crowding generally increased. Sixteen persons reported moderate or severe temporomandular joint (TMJ) problems, and of these 7 belonged to the group with crossbite in childhood. With few exceptions, the subjects in all samples had good oral hygiene, visited the dentist regularly, and had well-preserved dentitions. Mean number of missing teeth was significantly lower among those with normal occlusion compared with the malocclusion groups. Individuals with normal occlusion responded favorably to all questions related to attitudes and experiences about their teeth, while responses in the malocclusion groups varied.
Persons with the particular malocclusions examined experienced more problems related to teeth later in life compared with those having normal occlusion in childhood.
PubMed ID
21435527 View in PubMed
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99th Dahlem conference on infection, inflammation and chronic inflammatory disorders: immune therapies of type 1 diabetes: new opportunities based on the hygiene hypothesis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144028
Source
Clin Exp Immunol. 2010 Apr;160(1):106-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
L. Chatenoud
S. You
H. Okada
C. Kuhn
B. Michaud
J-F Bach
Author Affiliation
Université Paris Descarte, Paris, France. lucienne.chatenoud@inserm.fr
Source
Clin Exp Immunol. 2010 Apr;160(1):106-12
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Animals
Autoantigens - immunology
Bacteria - immunology
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - immunology - therapy
Europe - epidemiology
Humans
Hygiene
Hypersensitivity - immunology
Immunosuppression - methods
Immunotherapy - methods
Infection - immunology - microbiology
Mice
Pancreatitis - immunology - microbiology
Toll-Like Receptors - agonists
Young Adult
Abstract
Insulin-dependent (type 1) diabetes is a prototypic organ-specific autoimmune disease resulting from the selective destruction of insulin-secreting beta cells within pancreatic islets of Langerhans by an immune-mediated inflammation involving autoreactive CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes which infiltrate pancreatic islets. Current treatment is substitutive, i.e. chronic use of exogenous insulin which, in spite of significant advances, is still associated with major constraints (multiple daily injections, risks of hypoglycaemia) and lack of effectiveness over the long term in preventing severe degenerative complications. Finding a cure for autoimmune diabetes by establishing effective immune-based therapies is a real medical health challenge, as the disease incidence increases steadily in industrialized countries. As the disease affects mainly children and young adults, any candidate immune therapy must therefore be safe and avoid a sustained depression of immune responses with the attendant problems of recurrent infection and drug toxicity. Thus, inducing or restoring immune tolerance to target autoantigens, controlling the pathogenic response while preserving the host reactivity to exogenous/unrelated antigens, appears to be the ideal approach. Our objective is to review the major progress accomplished over the last 20 years towards that aim. In addition, we would like to present another interesting possibility to access new preventive strategies based on the 'hygiene hypothesis', which proposes a causal link between the increasing incidence of autoimmune diseases, including diabetes, and the decrease of the infectious burden. The underlying rationale is to identify microbial-derived compounds mediating the protective activity of infections which could be developed therapeutically.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20415859 View in PubMed
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[100,000 more adults visit the dentist: a few results of November 1989]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73759
Source
Nor Tannlaegeforen Tid. 1990 Jun;100(10):414-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1990
Author
J. Grytten
D. Holst
I. Rossow
O. Vasend
N. Wang
Author Affiliation
Odontologiske Fakultet, Universitetet i Oslo.
Source
Nor Tannlaegeforen Tid. 1990 Jun;100(10):414-22
Date
Jun-1990
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anxiety - epidemiology
Attitude to Health
DMF Index
Dental Care - economics - psychology
Dental Health Services - utilization
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Oral Hygiene
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to describe the Norwegian adult population according to: 1. number of teeth present, 2. demand and utilization of dental services, 3. travel time from home to the dentist, 4. dental health behaviour, 5. fear for dental treatment. The analyses were performed on a set of national data collected in 1989, which was representative of the non-institutionalized Norwegian population 20 years and above. The sample size was 1260 individuals. About 75% of the people had 20 teeth or more present. Nine percent were edentulous. Seventy-seven percent who had demanded dental services during the last year. The average expenditure for dental treatment for those who had demanded the services during the last year was NOK 826. Fifty-three percent travelled 15 minutes or less from home to the dentist. Eighteen percent travelled 30 minutes or more. Almost everybody with their own teeth present brushed their teeth regularly once a day. Thirty-three percent of all dentate people used woodsticks regularly once a day, while 20% used toothfloss regularly. Seventy-five percent had no to mild fear of the dentist, while 7% had a strong fear. Fear of the dentist was higher among women than among men. Fear of the dentist decreased by increasing age. Few people, less than 4%, had cancelled a dental appointment because of dental anxiety. There has been an improvement in dental health and dental health behaviour in Norway during the 1970's and 1980's. These improvements are discussed with special attention paid to the findings from the present study.
PubMed ID
2247358 View in PubMed
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[120th anniversary of F.F.Erisman Federal Research Centre for Hygiene].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130970
Source
Vestn Ross Akad Med Nauk. 2011;(8):47-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Source
Vestn Ross Akad Med Nauk. 2011;(8):47-51
Date
2011
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academies and Institutes - history
Ecotoxicology - history
Famous Persons
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Hygiene - history
Occupational Medicine - history
Public Health - history
Russia
Social Medicine - history
Abstract
F.F.Erisman Federal Research Center for Hygiene is a leading hygienic scientific centre of the Federal Service for Supervision in the Field of Consumer Rights Protection and Human Well-Being widely known in this country and abroad. The history of FRCH can be arbitrarily divided into the following three periods: prerevolutionary (1891-1917), Soviet (1917-1991), and modern (1991-the present time). The first period is the time of life and work of Fyedor Fyedorovich Erisman, professor of Moscow University and the founder of scientific hygiene in Russia. The second period is characterized by realization of F.F.Erisman's ideas based on achievements in biology, natural and experimental studies. The third period is associated with the name of professor A.I. Potapov, member of the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences. His authority, scientific experience, and organizational work made it possible to come out with credit of a most difficult situation in Russian science. Scientific, historical and staff-related issues are considered.
PubMed ID
21950135 View in PubMed
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Source
Moravian Seminary & Archives, Bethel, AK. 1 vol.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
1989
Author
Bendel, B.
Source
Moravian Seminary & Archives, Bethel, AK. 1 vol.
Date
1989
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
University of Alaska Anchorage
University of Alaska Fairbanks
Keywords
Tobacco abuse
Snuff
Insects
Personal hygiene
Notes
Alaska Medical Library - From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 299.
UAA/APU Consortium, Alaskana Collection F908.B46 1987 [1987 edition]
UAF - Rasmuson Library F908.B46 1989 ALASKA
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1590 records – page 1 of 159.