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[Activities of the liver microsome reductases in adult and aged rats during stress]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10009
Source
Vopr Med Khim. 2001 Nov-Dec;47(6):599-604
Publication Type
Article
Author
N P Rud'ko
V V Davydov
Author Affiliation
State Medical University, Mayakowsky av., 26, Zaporozhye, 69035, Ukraine.
Source
Vopr Med Khim. 2001 Nov-Dec;47(6):599-604
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging - metabolism
Animals
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Hydrogen Peroxide - pharmacology
Immobilization
Male
Microsomes, Liver - enzymology
Quinone Reductases - metabolism
Rats
Rats, Wistar
Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate - pharmacology
Stress, Psychological - enzymology
Urea - pharmacology
Abstract
The influence of 0.01% sodium dodecyl sulphate, 1.5 and 6.0 M urea and 0.03 M hydrogen peroxide to the NAD(P)H: 2,6 dichlorphenolindophenol reductase activity in livers of adult and old Wistar rats during immobilizing stress was interested. Obtained results indicate that the NADPH--dependent reductase is more resistant to modulating effect of sodium dodecyl sulphate, hydrogen peroxide and urea than NADH-dependent enzyme. The significant decrease of NADH: 2.6 dichlorphenolindophenol reductase sensitivity to the action of all studied modulators occurs in old rats. The similar changes appears in the adult rats liver during stress. The old rats immobilization is accompanied by a decrease of this enzyme activity and the reduction of the influence of all studied modulators to NADH: 2.6 dichlorphenolindophenol reductase as compared with adult ones. These changes in the activity and properties of microsomal NADH: 2,6 dichlorphenolindophenol reductase promote more pronounced decrease of the substrate hydroxylation in the liver of old rats during stress compared to adult ones.
PubMed ID
11925750 View in PubMed
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Alterations in intracellular reactive oxygen species generation and redox potential modulate mast cell function.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature14273
Source
Eur J Immunol. 1997 Jan;27(1):297-306
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1997
Author
K. Wolfreys
D B Oliveira
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine, Addenbrooke's Hospital, GB.
Source
Eur J Immunol. 1997 Jan;27(1):297-306
Date
Jan-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Catalase - pharmacology
Cell Survival
Deferoxamine - pharmacology
Glutathione - metabolism
Hydrogen Peroxide - pharmacology
Mast Cells - physiology
Oxidation-Reduction
Peritoneal Cavity - cytology
Rats
Reactive Oxygen Species - metabolism
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Serotonin - metabolism
Spleen - cytology
Sulfhydryl Reagents - pharmacology
Abstract
The administration of mercuric chloride (HgCl2), gold compounds, or D-penicillamine to Brown Norway (BN) rats causes a T helper (Th)2 cell-associated autoimmune syndrome characterized by the production of a number of autoantibodies, marked elevation of serum IgE concentration, and tissue injury in the form of a vasculitis and arthritis. We have recently shown that the same compounds in vitro sensitize BN rat peritoneal mast cells for IgE-triggered mediator release and interleukin-4 mRNA production. We wished to test the hypothesis that these agents influence mast cell function via an effect on intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production/redox balance. Mast cells were obtained from BN rats by peritoneal washout. Incubation with HgCl2, gold compounds or D-penicillamine (the latter only in the presence of copper ions) led to the intracellular production of ROS as shown by the oxidative production of the fluorescent compound 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein. Mast cells were more sensitive than splenocytes to this effect. Direct oxidative stress (exposure to H2O2) produced a similar sensitization for mediator release to that caused by HgCl2. Inhibition of ROS formation by desferrioxamine or catalase diminished the enhancement of IgE-mediated serotonin release caused by HgCl2, as did replenishment of intracellular glutathione. 2-Mercaptoethanol exacerbated the toxicity of HgCl2, perhaps due to the formation of a lipophilic complex that enhanced HgCl2 uptake. Blocking of glutathione synthesis increased the toxicity of HgCl2, but also abolished any sensitizing effect on mediator release. These results support three main predictions of our hypothesis: (1) the compounds known to influence mast cell function all lead to the generation of ROS within the mast cell; (2) direct oxidative stress causes sensitization for mediator release by the mast cell; and (3) modulation of ROS production/redox balance within the mast cell modulates the effects of these compounds on mast cell function. The balance of oxidative/antioxidative influences may play an important role in the modulation of mast cell function, particularly in the context of chemically induced autoimmunity.
PubMed ID
9022032 View in PubMed
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Antioxidant defense mechanisms of human mesothelioma and lung adenocarcinoma cells.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20527
Source
Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol. 2000 Apr;278(4):L696-702
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2000
Author
K. Järvinen
P. Pietarinen-Runtti
K. Linnainmaa
K O Raivio
C M Krejsa
T. Kavanagh
V L Kinnula
Author Affiliation
Childrens Hospital, University of Helsinki, 00029 Helsinki, 90220 Oulu Finland.
Source
Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol. 2000 Apr;278(4):L696-702
Date
Apr-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - metabolism - pathology
Antioxidants - metabolism
Catalase - metabolism
Glutamate-Cysteine Ligase - metabolism
Glutathione - metabolism
Humans
Hydrogen Peroxide - pharmacology
Lung Neoplasms - metabolism - pathology
Mesothelioma - metabolism - pathology
Oxidants - pharmacology
RNA, Messenger - metabolism
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Superoxide Dismutase - genetics - metabolism
Tumor Cells, Cultured
Vitamin K - pharmacology
Abstract
The development of drug resistance of tumors is multifactorial and still poorly understood. Some cytotoxic drugs generate free radicals, and, therefore, antioxidant enzymes may contribute to drug resistance. We investigated the levels of manganese superoxide dismutase (Mn SOD), its inducibility, and its protective role against tumor necrosis factor-alpha and cytotoxic drugs (cisplatin, epirubicin, methotrexate, and vindesin) in human pleural mesothelioma (M14K) and pulmonary adenocarcinoma (A549) cells. We also studied other major antioxidant mechanisms in relation to oxidant and drug resistance of these cells. A549 cells were more resistant than M14K cells toward both oxidants (hydrogen peroxide and menadione) and all the cytotoxic drugs tested. M14K cells contained higher basal Mn SOD activity than A549 cells (28.3 +/- 3.4 vs. 1.8 +/- 0.3 U/mg protein), and Mn SOD activity was significantly induced by tumor necrosis factor-alpha only in A549 cells (+524%), but the induction did not offer any protection during subsequent oxidant or drug exposure. Mn SOD was not induced significantly in either of these cell lines by any of the cytotoxic drugs (0.007-2 microM, 48 h) tested when assessed by Northern blotting, Western blotting, or specific activity. A549 cells contained higher catalase activity than M14K cells (7.6 +/- 1.3 vs. 3.6 +/- 0.5 nmol O(2). min(-1). mg protein(-1)). They also contained twofold higher levels of glutathione and higher immunoreactivity of the heavy subunit of gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase than M14K cells. Experiments with inhibitors of gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase and catalase supported our conclusion that mechanisms associated with glutathione contribute to the drug resistance of these cells.
PubMed ID
10749746 View in PubMed
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Antitumorigenic and cytotoxic properties of an ethanol extract derived from Rhus verniciflua Stokes (RVS).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192645
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2001 Oct 26;64(4):357-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-26-2001
Author
D D Kitts
K T Lim
Author Affiliation
Food, Nutrition, and Health, Faculty of Agricultural Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. ddkitts@unixg.ubc.ca
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2001 Oct 26;64(4):357-71
Date
Oct-26-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antioxidants - pharmacology
Cell Culture Techniques
Cell Death
Cell Division - drug effects
Chemoprevention
Copper - chemistry
DNA Damage - drug effects
Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel
Ethanol - chemistry
Free Radicals
Glycoproteins - isolation & purification - pharmacology
HeLa Cells - drug effects
Humans
Hydrogen Peroxide - pharmacology
Iron - pharmacology
Mice
Neoplasms - prevention & control
Neurons - drug effects
Oxidation-Reduction
Plant Extracts - pharmacology
Plasmids
Rhus
Abstract
In this study, the antioxidant, cytotoxic, and antitumorigenic activities of a fractionated, ethanol extract derived from Rhus verniciflua Stokes (RVS), a plant indigenous to Korea, China, and Japan, were determined. Physicochemical analysis and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) results indicated that the active component of a Sephadex G-150-fractionated RVS extract (PII fraction) was a copper-containing glycoprotein, possibly a plant laccase. Antioxidant activity of the fractionated RVS extract, observed in both aqueous and lipid in vitro oxidation reactions using 1,1-diphenyl 2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical, site-specific Fenton-reaction deoxyribose, and a model lipid emulsion test system, indicated an affinity for protection against hydroxyl and peroxyl radicals. Cultured mouse brain neurons were protected against glucose oxidase-induced hydroxyl radical in the presence of the fractionated RVS extract (e.g., 58% protection at 4.9 microM and 95% protection with 22.7 microM RVS). RVS was further shown to protect against in vitro Fenton-reaction-induced single- and double-strand scission in supercoiled plasmid DNA. Further testing for bioactivity of the fractionated RVS extract was based on the affinity to inhibit cell proliferation in cultured HeLa and CT-26 tumor cells. The presence of RVS resulted in 70% cell death after 24 h of incubation in both cell lines at a minimum concentration of 2.48 microM RVS. Data demonstrate multiple bioactive chemopreventative properties of a Sephadex G-150-fractionated extract derived from RVS.
PubMed ID
11693493 View in PubMed
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Effect of hydrogen peroxide treatment on microbial quality and appearance of whole and fresh-cut melons contaminated with Salmonella spp.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179044
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 2004 Sep 1;95(2):137-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1-2004
Author
Dike O Ukuku
Author Affiliation
Food Safety Intervention Technologies, Eastern Regional Research Center, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, 600 East Mermaid Lane, Wyndmoor, PA 19038, USA. dukuku@arserrc.gov
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 2004 Sep 1;95(2):137-46
Date
Sep-1-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Infective Agents, Local - pharmacology
Colony Count, Microbial
Consumer Product Safety
Cucumis - microbiology
Cucumis melo - microbiology
Food Handling - methods
Food Microbiology
Humans
Hydrogen Peroxide - pharmacology
Salmonella - drug effects - growth & development
Temperature
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The efficacy of hydrogen peroxide treatment on the inactivation of Salmonella spp. inoculated on the external surface of cantaloupe and honeydew melon was investigated. Salmonella was inoculated onto whole cantaloupe and honeydew melon to a final concentration of 4.65 log(10) CFU/cm(2) and 3.13 log(10) CFU/g, respectively. Inoculated whole melons stored at 5 degrees C for up to 7 days were washed with water, 2.5% and 5% hydrogen peroxide at day 0 and 5. Hydrogen peroxide (2.5% and 5%) treatments of whole melon for 5 min caused a 3 log(10) CFU/cm(2) reduction of the indigenous surface microflora and a 3.0 log(10) CFU/cm(2) reduction in Salmonella spp. on all melon surfaces. The efficacy of the hydrogen peroxide treatments was less when the interval between inoculation and treatment of cantaloupe exceeded 24 h. Unlike cantaloupe fresh-cut pieces, Salmonella was not recovered from fresh-cut pieces prepared from treated whole honeydew melon. Growth of Salmonella occurred in cantaloupe fresh-cut pieces stored at 10 or 20 degrees C, and by 2 weeks, levels reached approximately 1 log CFU/g. A rapid decline in appearance and overall acceptability was observed in fresh-cut pieces prepared from untreated whole cantaloupe. While Salmonella was recovered from fresh-cut pieces from and whole treated cantaloupe, sanitizing the surface of contaminated whole melons with hydrogen peroxide before and after cutting and storage of the fresh-cut pieces at 5 degrees C can enhance the microbial safety and acceptability rating for about 2 weeks after processing.
PubMed ID
15282126 View in PubMed
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Efficacy of neutral electrolyzed water (NEW) for reducing microbial contamination on minimally-processed vegetables.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159055
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 2008 Mar 31;123(1-2):151-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-31-2008
Author
Maribel Abadias
Josep Usall
Márcia Oliveira
Isabel Alegre
Inmaculada Viñas
Author Affiliation
IRTA, Centre UdL-IRTA, XaRTA-Postharvest, 191 Rovira Roure, 25198-Lleida, Catalonia, Spain. isabel.abadias@irta.cat
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 2008 Mar 31;123(1-2):151-8
Date
Mar-31-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Colony Count, Microbial
Consumer Product Safety
Disinfectants - pharmacology
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Escherichia coli O157 - drug effects - growth & development
Food Contamination - analysis - prevention & control
Food Handling - methods
Food Microbiology
Humans
Hydrogen Peroxide - pharmacology
Lettuce - microbiology
Listeria monocytogenes - drug effects - growth & development
Pectobacterium carotovorum - drug effects - growth & development
Salmonella - drug effects - growth & development
Temperature
Time Factors
Vegetables - microbiology
Abstract
Consumption of minimally-processed, or fresh-cut, fruit and vegetables has rapidly increased in recent years, but there have also been several reported outbreaks associated with the consumption of these products. Sodium hypochlorite is currently the most widespread disinfectant used by fresh-cut industries. Neutral electrolyzed water (NEW) is a novel disinfection system that could represent an alternative to sodium hypochlorite. The aim of the study was to determine whether NEW could replace sodium hypochlorite in the fresh-cut produce industry. The effects of NEW, applied in different concentrations, at different treatment temperatures and for different times, in the reduction of the foodborne pathogens Salmonella, Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli O157:H7 and against the spoilage bacterium Erwinia carotovora were tested in lettuce. Lettuce was artificially inoculated by dipping it in a suspension of the studied pathogens at 10(8), 10(7) or 10(5) cfu ml(-1), depending on the assay. The NEW treatment was always compared with washing with deionized water and with a standard hypochlorite treatment. The effect of inoculum size was also studied. Finally, the effect of NEW on the indigenous microbiota of different packaged fresh-cut products was also determined. The bactericidal activity of diluted NEW (containing approximately 50 ppm of free chlorine, pH 8.60) against E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella, L. innocua and E. carotovora on lettuce was similar to that of chlorinated water (120 ppm of free chlorine) with reductions of 1-2 log units. There were generally no significant differences when treating lettuce with NEW for 1 and 3 min. Neither inoculation dose (10(7) or 10(5) cfu ml(-1)) influenced the bacterial reduction achieved. Treating fresh-cut lettuce, carrot, endive, corn salad and 'Four seasons' salad with NEW 1:5 (containing about 50 ppm of free chlorine) was equally effective as applying chlorinated water at 120 ppm. Microbial reduction depended on the vegetable tested: NEW and sodium hypochlorite treatments were more effective on carrot and endive than on iceberg lettuce, 'Four seasons' salad and corn salad. The reductions of indigenous microbiota were smaller than those obtained with the artificially inoculated bacteria tested (0.5-1.2 log reduction). NEW seems to be a promising disinfection method as it would allow to reduce the amount of free chlorine used for the disinfection of fresh-cut produce by the food industry, as the same microbial reduction as sodium hypochlorite is obtained. This would constitute a safer, 'in situ', and easier to handle way of ensuring food safety.
PubMed ID
18237810 View in PubMed
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[Hydrogen peroxide inhibits acetylcholinesterase of myometrium sarcolemma]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97381
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 2009 Jul-Aug;81(4):32-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Iu V Danylovych
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 2009 Jul-Aug;81(4):32-8
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetylcholinesterase - metabolism
Animals
Cells, Cultured
Cholinesterase Inhibitors - pharmacology
Dithiothreitol - pharmacology
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Female
Hydrogen Peroxide - pharmacology
Kinetics
Myometrium - cytology - drug effects - enzymology
Sarcolemma - drug effects - enzymology
Substrate Specificity
Swine
Abstract
The action of hydrogen peroxide on acetylcholinesterase enzymatic activity in myometrium sarcolemma fraction is investigated. Hydrogen peroxide (0.1-26 microM), depending on the concentration, suppressed the activity. Acetylcholinesterase proved to be highly sensitive to the action of H2O2, making Ki = 2.4 +/- 0.4 microM, nH = 0.65 +/- 0.08 (n = 4-5). It is established, that hydrogen peroxide in the range of 1.6 - 6.4 microM essentially reduce V(0,max) and K(M). In the presence of dithiothreitole (a reducer of SH-groups of the membrane surface) the investigated substance effect considerably decreased.
PubMed ID
20387632 View in PubMed
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IL-4 gene expression up-regulated by mercury in rat mast cells: a role of oxidant stress in IL-4 transcription.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature14058
Source
Int Immunol. 2001 Mar;13(3):297-304
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2001
Author
Z. Wu
D R Turner
D B Oliveira
Author Affiliation
Division of Renal Medicine, St George's Hospital Medical School, Cranmer Terrace, London SW17 0RE, UK.
Source
Int Immunol. 2001 Mar;13(3):297-304
Date
Mar-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antioxidants - pharmacology
Autoimmunity
Cells, Cultured
Gene Expression Regulation - drug effects
Gene Expression Regulation, Leukemic - drug effects
Glutathione - pharmacology
Hydrogen Peroxide - pharmacology
Interleukin-4 - biosynthesis - genetics
Leukemia, Basophilic, Acute - pathology
Mast Cells - drug effects - metabolism
Mercuric Chloride - pharmacology
Neoplasm Proteins - biosynthesis - genetics
Oxidative Stress
Promoter Regions (Genetics)
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Reactive Oxygen Species
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Spleen - cytology
Th2 Cells - immunology
Transcription, Genetic - drug effects
Transfection
Tumor Cells, Cultured - drug effects
Abstract
In the Brown Norway (BN) rat, chemical compounds [mercuric chloride (HgCl2), D-penicillamine or gold salts] induce a T(h)2-dominated autoimmune syndrome with tissue injury in the form of a vasculitis and arthritis. An early phase of vasculitis in the model occurs within 24 h of an injection of HgCl2, is alphabeta T cell independent and involves the mast cell. In addition, HgCl2 induces IL-4 mRNA in mast cells from BN rats. Our recent work has demonstrated that the balance of oxidative/antioxidative influences plays an important role in the modulation of mast cell function (degranulation) in chemically induced autoimmunity. The aim of this study was to determine, in mast cells, whether oxidative status influences IL-4 transcription and translation, which is required for the development of a T(h)2 response. Exposure of the mast cell line RBL-2H3 to HgCl2 enhanced both IL-4 mRNA and its promoter activity. Oxidative stress by hydrogen peroxide mimicked the effects of HgCl2 in enhancing IL-4 promoter activity. The enhancement of IL-4 gene expression by HgCl2 was significantly reduced by antioxidants (both sulphydryl and non-sulphydryl containing). The same pattern of regulation was also observed on IL-4 protein expression in the mast cells. These data suggest a novel mechanism of IL-4 transcriptional up-regulation by oxidative stress. Our results provide evidence to support our hypothesis that alterations in intracellular reactive oxygen species production modulate both IL-4 gene expression and mast cell function.
PubMed ID
11222498 View in PubMed
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Intracellular redistribution of heme in rat liver under oxidative stress: the role of heme synthesis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9270
Source
Cell Biol Int. 2005 Jan;29(1):9-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2005
Author
Pavel A Kaliman
Tatyana Barannik
Ekaterina Strel'chenko
Natalya Inshina
Oxana Sokol
Author Affiliation
Biochemistry Department, Kharkiv National University, 61077 Kharkiv, Ukraine. pavel.a.kaliman@univer.kharkov.ua
Source
Cell Biol Int. 2005 Jan;29(1):9-14
Date
Jan-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
5-Aminolevulinate Synthetase - metabolism
Animals
Cycloheximide - pharmacology
Enzyme Induction - drug effects
Glutathione - metabolism
Glycerol
Heme - biosynthesis - metabolism
Heme Oxygenase (Decyclizing) - metabolism
Hemolysis - drug effects
Hydrogen Peroxide - pharmacology
In Vitro
Liver - metabolism - ultrastructure
Male
Mitochondria, Liver - drug effects - metabolism
Oxidative Stress - physiology
Phenylhydrazines - pharmacology
Rats
Rats, Wistar
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Rhabdomyolysis - chemically induced - metabolism
Tryptophan Oxygenase - metabolism
Unithiol - pharmacology
Abstract
Heme distribution in subcellular fractions of rat liver was studied first hours under the action of several agents causing oxidative stress in vivo. Total and post-mitochondrial heme content in liver was found to depend on both the level of hemolysis products in blood and agent's capacity to modify heme and hemoproteins. The increase of activity of 5-aminolevulinate synthase (ALAS) and/or heme accumulation in mitochondria was accompanied by increase of tryptophan-2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) heme saturation. Membrane stabilisation by tocopherol or prevention of early ALAS induction by cycloheximide prevented both mitochondrial heme accumulation and increase of TDO heme saturation. Modification of heme fully prevented the alterations of total heme content even under severe hemolysis as well as the increase of TDO heme saturation if no increase of heme synthesis occurred. Thus heme synthesis can greatly contribute to heme intracellular redistribution under oxidative stress.
PubMed ID
15763493 View in PubMed
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Lingonberry anthocyanins protect cardiac cells from oxidative-stress-induced apoptosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291010
Source
Can J Physiol Pharmacol. 2017 Aug; 95(8):904-910
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Aug-2017
Author
Cara K Isaak
Jay C Petkau
Heather Blewett
Karmin O
Yaw L Siow
Author Affiliation
a Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, St. Boniface Hospital Albrechtsen Research Centre, Winnipeg, MB R2H 2A6, Canada.
Source
Can J Physiol Pharmacol. 2017 Aug; 95(8):904-910
Date
Aug-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Anthocyanins - pharmacology
Antioxidants - pharmacology
Apoptosis - drug effects
Cell Line
Cytoprotection - drug effects
Hydrogen Peroxide - pharmacology
Myocardium - cytology - metabolism
Oxidative Stress - drug effects
Rats
Vaccinium vitis-idaea - chemistry
Abstract
Lingonberry grown in northern Manitoba, Canada, contains exceptionally high levels of anthocyanins and other polyphenols. Previous studies from our lab have shown that lingonberry anthocyanins can protect H9c2 cells from ischemia-reperfusion injury and anthocyanin-rich diets have been shown to be associated with decreased cardiovascular disease and mortality. Oxidative stress can impair function and trigger apoptosis in cardiomyocytes. This study investigated the protective effects of physiologically relevant doses of lingonberry extracts and pure anthocyanins against hydrogen-peroxide-induced cell death. Apoptosis and necrosis were detected in H9c2 cells after hydrogen peroxide treatment via flow cytometry using FLICA 660 caspase 3/7 combined with YO-PRO-1 and then confirmed with Hoechst staining and fluorescence microscopy. Each of the 3 major anthocyanins found in lingonberry (cyanidin-3-galactoside, cyanidin-3-glucoside, and cyanidin-3-arabinoside) was protective against hydrogen-peroxide-induced apoptosis in H9c2 cells at 10 ng·mL-1 (20 nmol·L-1) and restored the number of viable cells to match the control group. A combination of the 3 anthocyanins was also protective and a lingonberry extract tested at 3 concentrations produced a dose-dependent protective effect. Lingonberry anthocyanins protected cardiac cells from oxidative-stress-induced apoptosis and may have cardioprotective effects as a dietary modification.
PubMed ID
28384410 View in PubMed
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13 records – page 1 of 2.