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Intelligence in children with hydrocephalus, aged 4-15 years: a population-based, controlled study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91335
Source
Neuropediatrics. 2008 Jun;39(3):146-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Dalen K.
Bruarøy S.
Wentzel-Larsen T.
Laegreid L M
Author Affiliation
Department of Biological and Medical Psychology, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. knut.dalen@psych.uib.no
Source
Neuropediatrics. 2008 Jun;39(3):146-50
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Cerebrospinal Fluid Shunts - methods
Child
Child, Preschool
Humans
Hydrocephalus - complications - psychology - therapy
Intelligence - physiology
Learning Disorders - etiology - physiopathology
Norway
Psychometrics - methods
Regression Analysis
Retrospective Studies
Wechsler Scales - standards - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The aim of this population-based study is to investigate IQ and IQ-related factors in children with hydrocephalus (HC). Psychometric intelligence was assessed in subjects below the age of 7.3 years (N=52, F=18, M=34) with the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence - Revised (WPPSI-R) and for children above the age of 7.3 years (N=29, F=6, M=23) with the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children - Revised (WISC-R). The controls were matched according to age, gender, and geographic variables. All children were living in western Norway. 57 children had infantile HC (IH) and 24 had childhood HC (CH). Children with myelomeningocele (MMC), traumatic brain injury (TBI), or intracranial tumours were excluded. IQ levels were found to be significantly higher in the control group than in the HC groups. The Kaufman factors showed a similar pattern, with lowest values in IH, and CH intermediate between IH and NC. The results demonstrate that HC affects IQ. More specific cognitive profiles, such as non-verbal learning disabilities, are not detectable when using the Wechsler tests. For this purpose, other tests and models for analyses may be recommended.
PubMed ID
18991193 View in PubMed
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